Monty Python

10+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2005
1,322
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Nowhere particular
I received a thank-you from a reserve Navy MC resident who I had helped prep for his recent promotion board. He said his board, looking at reserve O-3 physicians for promotion to O-4, had a 50% opportunity. I verified these numbers for reserve O-3 physicians promoting to O-4 in the statistical archives on the NPC website:

FY10: 94%

FY11: 100% (64/64)

FY12: 60% opportunity (reflecting the "reset" after the USNR detached from the active duty "running-mate" promotion system --- a long story).

FY13: 95% opportunity

FY14: 80% opportunity

FY15: 90% opportunity

FY16: 50% opportunity (above zone was 1/31 for 3%; in zone 19/40 for 47%, reserves don't promote below zone).

That is simply brutal.
 
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NavyFP

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
May 18, 2006
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I have actually sat on one of these boards. Our precept was to promote 100% in-zone. We were not allowed to consider below zone promotions and for every above zone, we had to not pick an in-zone.


There are 3 types of officers that go before this board:
1) Those who have been active duty and gotten out.
2) Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be.
3) Those who simply joined the reserves and will not be entering active duty.

Those who have gotten out, many have no desire to continue their affiliation with the Navy and are waiting for their IRR time to run out. Those who wish to continue to affiliate with the Navy can be hard to identify. If this is you, and you want to get promoted, you need to write a letter to the board explaining your future plans with the Navy.

Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be. Usually it is easy to identify the NADDS and FAP. The GME office usually submits non-observed Fit Reps. They have a good chance of being promoted.

Those who just joined the reserves. They should have a paper trail of drilling. If not, they will likely be lumped in with the gotten out crew.

The bottom line for those in zone (or above), write a letter to the board and state your future Navy intentions. It will be given due consideration. Unfortunately, too many Medical Officers are not familiar with the varying programs. Many on my board needed to be educated about the various programs. In the end, I believe my board served the Navy and the members well. But more information is better. Sometimes it was educated guesswork.
 
OP
Monty Python

Monty Python

10+ Year Member
Apr 5, 2005
1,322
109
Nowhere particular
I have actually sat on one of these boards. Our precept was to promote 100% in-zone. We were not allowed to consider below zone promotions and for every above zone, we had to not pick an in-zone.


There are 3 types of officers that go before this board:
1) Those who have been active duty and gotten out.
2) Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be.
3) Those who simply joined the reserves and will not be entering active duty.

Those who have gotten out, many have no desire to continue their affiliation with the Navy and are waiting for their IRR time to run out. Those who wish to continue to affiliate with the Navy can be hard to identify. If this is you, and you want to get promoted, you need to write a letter to the board explaining your future plans with the Navy.

Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be. Usually it is easy to identify the NADDS and FAP. The GME office usually submits non-observed Fit Reps. They have a good chance of being promoted.

Those who just joined the reserves. They should have a paper trail of drilling. If not, they will likely be lumped in with the gotten out crew.

The bottom line for those in zone (or above), write a letter to the board and state your future Navy intentions. It will be given due consideration. Unfortunately, too many Medical Officers are not familiar with the varying programs. Many on my board needed to be educated about the various programs. In the end, I believe my board served the Navy and the members well. But more information is better. Sometimes it was educated guesswork.
All great advice, thank you. I still can't get over the historical average of >80% opportunity for reserve O-3 physicians to make O-4 dropping to just 50% this year. That's usually the average for CDRs going for CAPT.
 

NavyFP

Senior Member
10+ Year Member
May 18, 2006
2,718
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Manning a Cubicle
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I am not sure why this would be true either. It seems low for what should be a mirror test. (breath on mirror, make steam = selection) On my board, we ended up selecting only 75% in zone. Mostly because we ferreted out many of those who were not pursuing further affiliation or those who you would REALLY not want us to select.
 

TheEarDoc

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7+ Year Member
Dec 28, 2010
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That seems really low! Used to be almost a given to promote from O-3 to O-4 in each branch on the first go around unless you really screwed the pooch somehow!
 
Jul 29, 2015
2
0
I have actually sat on one of these boards. Our precept was to promote 100% in-zone. We were not allowed to consider below zone promotions and for every above zone, we had to not pick an in-zone.


There are 3 types of officers that go before this board:
1) Those who have been active duty and gotten out.
2) Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be.
3) Those who simply joined the reserves and will not be entering active duty.

Those who have gotten out, many have no desire to continue their affiliation with the Navy and are waiting for their IRR time to run out. Those who wish to continue to affiliate with the Navy can be hard to identify. If this is you, and you want to get promoted, you need to write a letter to the board explaining your future plans with the Navy.

Those who have not been on active duty but soon will be. Usually it is easy to identify the NADDS and FAP. The GME office usually submits non-observed Fit Reps. They have a good chance of being promoted.

Those who just joined the reserves. They should have a paper trail of drilling. If not, they will likely be lumped in with the gotten out crew.

The bottom line for those in zone (or above), write a letter to the board and state your future Navy intentions. It will be given due consideration. Unfortunately, too many Medical Officers are not familiar with the varying programs. Many on my board needed to be educated about the various programs. In the end, I believe my board served the Navy and the members well. But more information is better. Sometimes it was educated guesswork.
Any idea if this is true for the AF as well. I will be going IRR soon, but would like to continue drilling. However, I hear that the AF pretty much does not promote anyone in this category.