Sep 5, 2015
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Wanted to get any opinions on their Phd Clinical Psych program? Is it good/bad and how competitive it is. Thanks.
 

MamaPhD

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It's an unusual program in several respects, but solid. It could be a great fit if you're interested in a clinically-oriented career, esp. in health psychology or neuropsychology.
 

chicandtoughness

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The one plus is that you have a more or less guaranteed APA accredited internship which is built into the program. Certainly helps relieve the stress from applying and matching to internships.
 

PsyDr

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A few of reitans students are on faculty there, so pretty solid.
 

AcronymAllergy

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I would reiterate what's been said--it's atypical in that the internship is captive and (I believe) half-time over two years, but I've known a couple folks who came through there and they've been well-trained.
 
OP
Neuroplast
Sep 5, 2015
50
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Psychology Student
Yes it is located in a setting where APA internship is built within the program. Interested in their neuropsychology program, however I don't how competitive it is. This will be one of my top schools to apply to later on.
 

Kadhir

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Great program. Very, very well trained people who are well regarded in the field. They place well for post-docs. I was accepted several years ago and did not attend. Feel free to PM with questions.
 

PSYDNEUROGUY

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I couldn't recommend it enough; I was a graduate research assistant in the Department of Neuropsychology and a clinical extern in the Department of Neurology and was really fortunate to build clinical and research skills there. I have many friends that now attend that program and I envy them (I moved to Miami due to my husband getting into pharmacy school, otherwise I would have applied). The biggest selling point is their part time APA-accredited internship that is only for UTSW doctoral students; no one else can take part in it. If you want diversity in research opportunities, this is your place. If you like pediatrics, neuropsychology or health psychology, you have the ability to take part in research across multiple departments (neurology, epilepsy unit, depression clinic, psychiatry, neuroscience, etc.).
 

stw2010

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Wanted to preface this -- as just one interaction I had. But I know someone who is on a selection committee at a major hospital for their post doc program. The hospital has interviewed students from UT Southwestern; however this person noted that the committee often ranked these individuals lower as there were some reservations about the half-time nature internship and it being in-house. As a result they often questioned the rigor of training expected to occur during internship as well as the exposure to other training mentors (alluding to almost this idea of "in breeding")
Again this was just one site.
 
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PSYDNEUROGUY

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Jul 28, 2016
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Wanted to preface this -- as just one interaction I had. But I know someone who is on a selection committee at a major hospital for their post doc program. The hospital has interviewed students from UT Southwestern; however this person noted that the committee often ranked these individuals lower as there were some reservations about the half-time nature internship and it being in-house. As a result they often questioned the rigor of training expected to occur during internship as well as the exposure to other training mentors (alluding to almost this idea of "in breeding")
Again this was just one site.
Interesting! While I can't speculate as to if this is accurate nationwide, I can tell you that many of my friends in the program who have since graduated have assumed post-doctoral positions in neuropsychology at the Mayo Clinic (both in NY and FL), The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Washington's VA Medical Center, Dallas' VA Medical Center, University of Florida, and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine. I know many of them have gone on to work at several VA centers and some of them work in private practice. UTSW also has a two year post-doctoral program in neuropsychology that is chaired by a board certified (ABPP-CN) neuropsychologist and has several other ABPP neuropsychologists on faculty as well.

UTSW has been the focus of many 3rd party institutional gatherings such as the NFL, in which UTSW hosted them to discuss sports related brain injuries - several NFL board members including the president were there. The Department of Neuropsychology is also utilized by The Dallas Cowboys and the Dallas Stars to conduct neuropsychological evaluations since the chief of neuropsychology is part of both medical teams. Dr. Cullum (the chief) is simply an amazing person and neuropsychologist to learn from and to work with. He ensures that his students are prepared so that they can attain high-profile post-doctoral positions. It also helps that he was past president of APA div. 40 and NAN, and I believe AACN. I could go on and on about the reasons for which UTSW is a phenomenal place to earn one's doctorate.
 

MamaPhD

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Wanted to preface this -- as just one interaction I had. But I know someone who is on a selection committee at a major hospital for their post doc program. The hospital has interviewed students from UT Southwestern; however this person noted that the committee often ranked these individuals lower as there were some reservations about the half-time nature internship and it being in-house. As a result they often questioned the rigor of training expected to occur during internship as well as the exposure to other training mentors (alluding to almost this idea of "in breeding")
Again this was just one site.
I have wondered about this myself. Usually captive internship + multiple "home grown" faculty = red flag, but UTSW seems not to fit this pattern.
 

chicandtoughness

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[deleted]
 
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Kadhir

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From what I remember, the clinical opportunities at UTSW are quite diverse (many different settings/clinics through the hospital system- even a psych ED maybe?), which is why I think they've been able to sustain this model. Students do not complete a formal master's thesis either (again, IIRC). I imagine this leaves more time for the clinical piece, and indeed, the program is ideal for someone more clinically oriented. I've certainly seen students present and publish, though, given all the active research protocols in the med center.

The biggest drawback, which I don't think has been mentioned, is that it isn't a fully funded program (a la another medically-based program, Northwestern Feinberg).
 

PSYDNEUROGUY

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Jul 28, 2016
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From what I remember, the clinical opportunities at UTSW are quite diverse (many different settings/clinics through the hospital system- even a psych ED maybe?), which is why I think they've been able to sustain this model. Students do not complete a formal master's thesis either (again, IIRC). I imagine this leaves more time for the clinical piece, and indeed, the program is ideal for someone more clinically oriented. I've certainly seen students present and publish, though, given all the active research protocols in the med center.

The biggest drawback, which I don't think has been mentioned, is that it isn't a fully funded program (a la another medically-based program, Northwestern Feinberg).

This is partially true; At least within the first year, students are paying out of pocket. The in-state tuition is very low, but even out-of-state tuition is much lower than many other state universities around the country. From what my friends told me, you do get some funding later on, especially in years 3 and 4. UTSW was my top choice, the clinical opportunities and where they place their students after grad school (i.e. post-doc and full time employment) were very attractive. Research there is also amazing; many students use archival data from many departments such as neurosurgery, but they also cross-collaborate with neighboring UT Dallas's Center for Brain Health. While I was there, we were conducting new studies on the RBANS and its feasibility in a tele-medicine format; it was also a DoD-funded project. For neuropsychology students, you will be studying and learning under a professor who has literally written and co-authored some of the most fundamental textbooks in clinical neuropsychology to date. He does a good deal of forensic neuropsychology work for the DoD and other agencies, so this is also something very unique that one might not find at too many schools. Dr. Laura Lacritz is also on faculty and is currently president of NAN. She too studied at UTSW as a student of Dr. Cullum.
 
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OP
Neuroplast
Sep 5, 2015
50
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Hmm, I didn't know UTSW was not fully funded. What are some of my options to consider on programs that are not fully funded? Are there other ways of getting such programs funded such as scholarships, and or grants, etc.? Is so where can I find this information.
 

Kadhir

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Nov 13, 2015
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Hmm, I didn't know UTSW was not fully funded. What are some of my options to consider on programs that are not fully funded? Are there other ways of getting such programs funded such as scholarships, and or grants, etc.? Is so where can I find this information.
Maybe, and this probably changes year to year. The best source of information would be the program's website, and then maybe the program assistant/coordinator. If you interview, you can talk to faculty about options- I remember them being really open about it and willing to help.
 

AcronymAllergy

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Agreed--best bet to explore funding options would be through the program itself, as it could change from year to year (or even semester to semester).

Other folks on here may also know of national grad student scholarships/fellowships that are available; I, unfortunately, am woefully under-informed about those.