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very bitter about not being able to do medicine....

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Omyss

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    The bipolar disorder may have been a factor in the OP not doing well, this is true. I can't really argue with that. But it is one of several factors, IMHO. The OP has also admitted that he or she has no real interest in medicine. Basically, the OP only wants to do medicine because s/he thinks that becoming a doctor will make others respect him/her and because s/he will be able to earn a high income. In other words, the reason the OP wants to do medicine is to curb some self-esteem issues.
    If the OP had a genuine interest in medicine, s/he would have probably put forth a lot more effort into his/her classes. That is what most premeds, who have a real passion for medicine, do. The passion for medicine is what drives so many premeds to become gunners, shooting for nothing less than an A.
    In my opinion, the OP needs to take some time to mature and find something s/he is passionate about before committing to any kind of career. And s/he needs to pick a career for the right reasons, not because s/he thinks it will impress other people.


    Actually the OP never said he didn;t have any real interest in medicine... he just claimed that the main reasons he persued med were b/c he wanted to have a career that comes with respect/prestige good hours and can boost self-esteem etc.

    Now even the "noblest" of premeds will have non-altruistic motives for meds (ie money, prestige etc) in addition to the motives such as a passion for medical sciences, helping others others, research etc etc. The main difference here is the OP is suffering from bipolar disorder (who's severity is unknown to us, but surely has taken a large toll on his life and grades). With a chronic debilitating illness such as this, it is often difficult to look for a career mainly from altruistic perspectives (helping others) or other "right reasons" (ie passion for science/research), instead one in this position will often be more motivated by motives that can alleviate some of the suffering attached with the condition (ie lack of self-esteem, the need for prestige and reassurance). I don't agree that just because the OP isn't mostly motivated by the "right reasons" he thus hasn't been able to work hard and get the necessary grades. As i said above he is motivated by reasons which are "right" to him and his situation, but unfortununetely the affects of his illness have prevented him from acheiving his goal.


    In this case i can totally understand the perspective of the OP and i still beleive that he needs to get his condition under control before he pursues anything and that he can and still should pursue meds once that is done.
     

    NobodysHero

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      Your problem is not with your career decision. Your problem is self esteem and you're not going to get anywhere until you fix it. If that means seeing a therapist then just do it. You seem to care too much about what other people are thinking and because of that, you'll never be happy. Forget about people you went to high school with. Forget about what everyone else is doing and just do what you want. You'll make new friends in whatever you end up doing.

      My opinion on your career decision is that you're doing it for the wrong reasons. Money and prestige can be big motivators, but if you hate what you're doing it won't be enough.
       
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      Maxwell Edison

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        People who think that stupid people don't exist are stupid.

        Everyone is the victim of our evolutionary inheritance of the reptilian brain. Combine that with our simian yearning for tribalism, outsized endocrine complexes and general disinterest in the life of others and presto...you have a whole species of stupid individuals who have been faceciously named "wise man." Don't be proud or ashamed that you happen to fall into one part or another of the bell curve; you didn't do anything to get there.
         

        FuturamaFan

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          Everyone is the victim of our evolutionary inheritance of the reptilian brain. Combine that with our simian yearning for tribalism, outsized endocrine complexes and general disinterest in the life of others and presto...you have a whole species of stupid individuals who have been faceciously named "wise man." Don't be proud or ashamed that you happen to fall into one part or another of the bell curve; you didn't do anything to get there.

          One implication of this comment might be that there's no room for mobility, which seems both pessimistic and patently false. But what is this "bell curve" that you're talking about? If you're talking about IQ, then your claim is controversial, because this is hotly contested--a single number can't seem to measure different types of intelligence across cultures (remember the example of the African knowing about the presence of a tiger in the grass while the New Yorker doesn't but can better navigate the subway). And there are a bunch of other critiques out there (see "The Mismeasure of Man"). If you're not talking about IQ, then what aggregate of which human qualities comprise your "bell curve?"
           

          Maxwell Edison

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            One implication of this comment might be that there's no room for mobility, which seems both pessimistic and patently false. But what is this "bell curve" that you're talking about? If you're talking about IQ, then your claim is controversial, because this is hotly contested--a single number can't seem to measure different types of intelligence across cultures (remember the example of the African knowing about the presence of a tiger in the grass while the New Yorker doesn't but can better navigate the subway). And there are a bunch of other critiques out there (see "The Mismeasure of Man"). If you're not talking about IQ, then what aggregate of which human qualities comprise your "bell curve?"

            Although the notion of IQ was refuted in Gould's "Mismeasure" (wherein I think he also posits that intelligence is not genetically fixed and therefore flexible) and the concept of "special intelligences" exists also (see "Guns, Germs, and Steel") we're not talking about intelligence across cultures. We're not even talking about a literal measurement.

            The fact is, you were born with a certain potential for cognitive capacity, and generally speaking, the environment in which this capacity was allowed to expand was not made through any artifice of your own. Instead, it involves the conditions surrounding your birth; where you were born, how rich your parents were, how socially well-adapted your peer environment was, etc. So whether you believe that intelligence is fixed or not, the extent to which your intelligence is "your fault/to your credit" is minimal.

            As such, individuals should not disdain others for being "stupid." Chances are that the conditions gave rise to that person's cognitive state were largely beyond their control.
             

            FuturamaFan

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              The fact is, you were born with a certain potential for cognitive capacity, and generally speaking, the environment in which this capacity was allowed to expand was not made through any artifice of your own. Instead, it involves the conditions surrounding your birth; where you were born, how rich your parents were, how socially well-adapted your peer environment was, etc. So whether you believe that intelligence is fixed or not, the extent to which your intelligence is "your fault/to your credit" is minimal.

              As such, individuals should not disdain others for being "stupid." Chances are that the conditions gave rise to that person's cognitive state were largely beyond their control.

              Thanks for clearing up what you mean a little. But I'm not sure that anyone actually called the OP "stupid," except in a lighthearted joking way or by the OP him/herself. Sure, someone called an entire group of people stupid, but that person was trying to be a wise-ass, and his/her comment turned out to be a funny little statement.

              I don't think we're talking about innate intelligence in the context of this thread's commentary. Rather, it seems that we're talking about dumb decisions or naivety. When someone makes a bad decision or doesn't take the time to figure out their ass from their elbow, when past experience has shown that that person seems capable of right decisions and knowing about stuff, then, yes, that person can get called "stupid." Maybe it would be more appropriate to call their particular decision "stupid" or their inability (unwillingness?) to see through the fog "stupid," and not them themselves "stupid." But that's just what people do. And it seems to me that even in a world where everyone is stupid, as you say, a little forethought can go a long way in terms of how one makes a particular decision--forethought that can become habitual by exercising one's free will. Unless you don't believe in free will, which, of course, we can debate, because there are good arguments either way.

              We can say objectively that people are wrong, and this often translates into the word "stupid." Calling people "stupid" (saying their decisions are wrong or that they haven't taken the time to see through the smoke) will no doubt hurt feelings. But it will let them know (unless the stupid-caller is himself wrong in his assessment) what they're up against, and above all, it's honest.
               
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              Maxwell Edison

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                You're right, this isn't about the OP, it's about the later comments. Even then, there isn't a justification for charging people with being stupid: human beings are not hard-wired for critical thinking and forethought. Both of these are skills that are developed by having a rich learning environment, and their absence generally results in poor decision making.

                In any case, I want to quit my hijack of this thread. Sorry folks.
                 

                patiencebites

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                  Wow... That there is some serious negative thinking. There is no job in the world that is suddenly going to make you feel like people respect you, if you think the world looks down on you now. That is something you need to work out in therapy or with someone you trust.

                  For me it was therapy, because I could trust a stranger to tell me straight without sparing my feelings.

                  Anyway, I hope you get things figured out. It is AMAZING what a change in perspective can do for your outlook on the world.

                  My advice? Try doing exactly what you want to do for a while, even if it doesn't pay much, or anything. Tell people what you are really thinking. Don't worry about how they will react at all. This will help you feel more 'real'.

                  By the way, the feelings you describe are incredibly common in young adulthood (post college), but no one ever talks about them. They just assume they are alone. It is being called a 'quarter life crisis'.

                  Bonne chance!
                   

                  zoey1912

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                    Imagine how female docs feel - all those years of medical school, all that money, the nice white coat, and patients and their families still call us "nurse". :eek:

                    Thank goodness you did not waste your time and money to end up like that.


                    I'm sorry, but that statement seems way off. I see female docs all day at work and they arn't mistaken as a nurse! I even work in nutrition and wear a long white coat, and am mistaken for a doctor every day! And yes, I'm a girl!
                     
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                    intuition

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                      i would consider myself blessed. getting into medicine for the wrong reasons would end up making for a miserable life. there are a lot of perks to being a physician, but the sum of those perks don't outweigh how much BS, stress, etc. you have to deal with. so if you aren't in it for the right reasons, it's simply not worth it.

                      so be happy you're not going to find yourself hating medicine as a 3rd year medical student with 100K of debt hanging over your head and in too deep not to finish. now, you have the chance to find something that truly makes you happy.


                      I feel like its too late..I want to go into research in Psychology or become a child Psychologist, but there's no money or RESPECT in that
                       
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                      Top Gun

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                        I feel like its too late..I want to go into research in Psychology or become a child Psychologist, but there's no money or RESPECT in that

                        There may not be a lot of money, but those fields sure as hell are respectable! If you became a child psychologist, you could have a chance to help kids with autism or emotional/behavioral disorders. And there is plenty of research going on in psychology right now, research that could help lots of people with psychological issues. If psychology is something that interests you, I think you should go for it.

                        And again, stop thinking about prestige all the time! Getting a prestigious job isn't everything. Just because a job is not held in high regard by the public doesn't mean its not important. Even sanitation workers provide an important service. Without them, we would have disease spreading among the populace. Just do something you love and enjoy doing it!
                         

                        Heratan

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                          Some people aren't built for certain things. For example, not everyone can be a pro basketball player. Cheer up, life isn't all about being a doctor, even for those who are doctors.
                          As I always say, not everyone is meant to be a doctor. Before you give up your dreams, try applying to an DO school. You get to call yourself a doctor and your patients wont know the difference.
                           

                          bigman225

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                            As I always say, not everyone is meant to be a doctor. Before you give up your dreams, try applying to an DO school. You get to call yourself a doctor and your patients wont know the difference.

                            From your posting history, I find it HIGHLY ironic that you are the one parading around the "not everyone is meant to be a doctor" line
                            Why don't you try some humility on for size?
                             

                            Heratan

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                              From your posting history, I find it HIGHLY ironic that you are the one parading around the "not everyone is meant to be a doctor" line
                              Why don't you try some humility on for size?

                              I'm just recommending him a realistic option. As this point he might be able to become a DO Doctor, and still be a real doctor. My upbringing has allowed me amazing opportunities including a great medical school, but I'm not going to gloat.
                               

                              ManualEvac

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                                I feel like its too late..I want to go into research in Psychology or become a child Psychologist, but there's no money or RESPECT in that

                                Don't base your decision on the supposed "respect" in a given field. Based on this forum and my personal encounters, I think most MDs are pretty butt-hurt about how little respect their patients show considering the insane amount of training they get.

                                Also, DO NOT go into any profession to "help" people until you start working on yourself (therapy, Prozac, Hare Krishna, whatever floats your boat). This idea of the "wounded healer" is a load of crap. I was significantly less effective as a teacher and therapist until I stopped obsessing about helping patients and students in my work and started to managed my own BiPolar II.
                                 

                                smalldogman

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                                  Don't be too hard on the OP; I can sympathize greatly with him.

                                  My transcripts are full of C's and occasional B's. It just tears me up that it's now next to impossible for me to get accepted anywhere for medical school.
                                   
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