WAMC: What Are My Chances

Discussion in 'Psychology [Psy.D. / Ph.D.]' started by Therapist4Chnge, Dec 15, 2009.

  1. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    The reputable PsyDs will have just as much in the realm of research as good balanced PhD programs, so I would look at both. Your GRE scores are good, so I wouldn't worry much there. The grant writing job definitely helps. The relative lack of research may be a slight knock. All in all, you should still apply broadly according to fit. You'd still stand a good chance, if the fit is right, especially at places that don't get a crapton of applications mostly due to location.
     
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  3. psych.meout

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    "Top" PsyD programs are very competitive (on par with funded PhD programs) and often emphasize research to a degree on par with many scientist-practitioner programs.

    http://mitch.web.unc.edu/files/2013/10/Admissions-Rates.pdf

    Thus, you may be underestimating the commitment to research required of you, as well as how much research experience you need to be competitive.

    Instead of volunteering for a crisis hotline, you'd get more value for your time and energy by getting more research experience.
     
  4. logicpsych2012

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    I would echo what others are saying. Your GREs and GPA are all fine, I would focus on research experience. (Not to say the crisis hotline isn't good additionally). But I would say that during the interview process, the top PsyDs were way more focused on my research experience than clinical
    Also - I'm sure Denver has good match rates/outcomes, but that price tag would make me consider it not a top program
    I would throw in IUP, ISU, and Georgia Southern which have much higher funding opportunities.
     
  5. psychhopeful121

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    Thank you all for the incredibly helpful responses!! Might anyone have suggestions as to how to improve research experience? Apart from leaving my job to became a research assistant, I'm having trouble thinking of any others (like I said, my knowledge on the research world is definitely lacking)

    Edited to add: thank you for the program recs as well! :)
     
    #4154 psychhopeful121, Apr 19, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  6. psych.meout

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    -Volunteering in a lab at a local university in your off-time (this might be difficult, depending on the lab, if you work 9-5, because that may be when they would need you)
    -Switching to a non-RA or even clinical job that has some research component or opportunity (E.g., I worked as a psychometrist and jumped on a couple of peripheral opportunities to be part of research at the site)
    -Completing a post-bacc program and joining a professor's lab
    -Completing a terminal master's degree with a thesis component
     
  7. moodypsy

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    Considering a PHD in Quantitative Psychology

    Background:
    I attended the University of Tennessee - Knoxville

    Relevant Coursework - Psychology (27 hours, 3 hours per course)
    Psych 110 - General Psychology - 3.0
    Psych 330 - Abnormal Psychology - 4.0
    Psych 360 - Social Psychology - 4.0
    Psych 220 - Humanistic Psychology - 4.0
    Psych 385 - Stats is Psychology - 4.0
    Psych 395 - Methods of Research in Psychology - 4.0
    Psych 489 - Supervised Research - 4.0
    Psych 445 - Measurement and Testing - 4.0
    Psych 310 - Learning and Thinking - 3.0
    Overall Psych GPA: 3.78

    Mathematics Coursework:
    Calc I: B
    Calc II: B+
    Calc III: D+ (Bad I know....)

    Statistics Coursework:
    STAT 320 - Regression/Correlation Methods: A
    STAT 265 - Statistical Process Control: A-
    STAT 330 - Experimental Methods: A
    STAT 461 - Statistical Models: C+ (Also Bad ... Same Semester/Life Happens)
    STAT 474 - Intro to Data Mining - B+

    GRE:
    Verbal 155 69%
    Quant 164 87%
    Writting 4.0 60%

    What can I do academically to increase my chances of admission?
     
  8. psych.meout

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    Your coursework looks good (I'm betting the vast majority of people are going to have trouble with Calc III) and your GRE scores are probably fine (though I know far less about quant programs than clinical ones), but do you have any research experience?
     
  9. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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    I see you have "supervised research" listed among your courses. Was this just for a semester or do you have a longer record of involvement in a lab? Research experience is the main thing missing from your application.

    Why quant, btw?
     
  10. moodypsy

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    Thanks MamaPhD! Yes research experience is definitely missing from my resume. I'm not sure how to pursue it at this point. I have two Masters options that I have been accepted into: 1) Master of Public Health in Biostatistics and 2) Master of Science in Business Analytics. Both require a consulting project that I hope will lead to good recommendations. Do you think admission committees would favor one program over the other? I did not apply for purely statistics masters programs because I thought my lack of linear algebra and weak Calc III grade would disqualify me.

    I am attracted to quantitative psychology because I am interested in educating the public on efficient ways to identify and solve public health concerns. (i.e. using statistical methods to illustrate the $ value of the burden of mental health disease in the United States, recommending best practices for dealing with missing data related to participant withdrawals in research studies, and strengthening and promoting the use of mental health screening tools). I was torn between quantitative psychology and clinical psychology as I am interested in both the people and the statistics; however, I really cannot see myself providing counseling services.
     
  11. moodypsy

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    Thanks for your reply! Unfortunately I am significantly lacking on the research experience and am at a loss for how to get it now that I am out of school. I have been accepted into two Masters programs: 1) Master of Public Health in Bio-statistics and 2) Master of Science in Business Analytics. Both require consulting projects that I am hoping will lead to positive letters of recommendation; however, I am torn between the two programs. On one hand, I believe Biostats is more relevant. On the other hand, I am not sure how well I would fair in the workplace with a MPH in Biostats if the PHD proves to be unobtainable (i.e. I never get in).
     
  12. Hunter9693

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    Hi guys I am interested if anyone can provide me some insight on my chances of getting into the following phd clinical psychology programs:

    Teachers College, Columbia
    City College (CUNY)
    Fordham
    LIU brooklyn
    Adelphi
    St. Johns

    These schools have faculty whom highly match my research interests: psychotherapy (dynamic).

    Anyways, I spent 2.5 years at a community college where my grades were not so great due to personal issues. I luckily was able to transfer to a very well known/well respected 4 year school, majored in psych where I pulled off excellent grades. I will graduate next year. My GPA will likey be >3.7. I landed a summer RA position in a ivy league university as well as an RA position at a well known veterans hospital. I am also an aba therapist for autistic children. I have yet to take the GREs, I am a little nervous but i will be studying for the next 6 months.

    Any thoughts? Would I be a strong enough candidate to get accepted, and maybe funded?
     
  13. wtfook

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    Your GPA seems fine. I would say it would all depend on your GRE scores and whether you could get some publications/presentations out of your RA positions. A summer wont be enough research experience. You'd want to be there enough time that you could show on your resume you can produce something either in the form of a poster, co-author, or paper presentation at a conference.

    Also, I'm not sure if you already researched this or not, but most if not all of the programs on your list are partially funded. I know at last this is the case for the CUNYs, TC, Adelphi, LIU, and St. Johns. I think I saw on this forum a while back that Fordham is fully funded but I'm not sure how that is now. I don't know if you were only looking for at least some funding or hoping for full funding. I might recommend adding some fully funded programs to your list. In addition, all of your programs are in NYC, a HIGHLY competitive region. Are you geographically limited due to personal reasons? Or simply prefer to stay in NYC? Because even people with amazing stats can't get into an NYC program because it's such a desirable area. I'd recommend branching out geographically to other cities and less desirable geographical areas. That would increase your chances a great deal AND increase your chances of landing a FULLY funded program.
     
  14. PlatoPsychology

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    Sorry for asking this question here but I wasn't sure where to post this :shy:

    I noticed there are a lot of faculties that list having a research interest in certain ethnic group or race.
    For an example, faculty A may have a research interest in masculinity and gender norm in hispanic communities.

    If a student were to apply to work with faculty A because they have an interest in masculinity and gender norm but not necessarily with the hispanic communities, would that not be considered a "good fit"?

    How specific does an applicant have to be when they explain their "fit" with the faculty?
     
  15. Hk328

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    That may be up to the individual faculty member. Have you tried reaching out to that person? That's a good way to start a rapport with your potential POI.
     
    #4164 Hk328, Apr 25, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2018
  16. PlatoPsychology

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    No I haven't! I plan on start applying this fall and thought it may be a bit too early to contact them. I wanted to see what the "general rule of thumb" is before I finalize on my list of programs.
     
  17. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    In my experience, that would be a good fit. Usually, the faculty does not want their student to be an exact clone of their research. There should be a good deal of overlap, but not 100%.
     
  18. PlatoPsychology

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    Is there a reason why they wouldn't want an exact clone to their research?? :wideyed:
     
  19. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    It doesn't open up any new avenues. And, if they only take grad students doing the exact same thing, you end up with a lab of everyone fighting each other to do the same things. Some variability is good. Every lab in the grad programs I was in had students with offshoots of research.
     
  20. HelloClarise

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    Fake news?
    Rosemead's Ph.D. and Psy.D. programs have an 88% and 91% match rate from 2012-16... The Ph.D. program does better with accredited internships (~75% vs 55%). It is certainly expensive and excuse my apologetics in my first post, but Rosemead's EPPP pass rate was 100% (10/10) and 89% (8/9) for PhD and PsyD programs in 2016.

    I leave this here with the hopes that if anyone is interested, they can make an informed decision based on accurate info. Fuller is considerably more expensive than Rosemead as well due to their master's in Theology requirement. Cheers
     
  21. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Not fake news. Generally, when people talk about match rates, they talk about accredited match rates as they are the only ones that matter for the majority of people. Rosemead PsyDs accredited match rates topped out at 56% for the last 4 years reported buy APPIC. That is straight up embarrassing. The PhD program does better, but has some extreme variability that is concerning in the past several years (50-90%). The information is available through APPIC for whoever wants to look at it. Heck, they can get it all the way back to 2000 if they want. Aside from the nearly unfathomable 32k in tuition per year alone, the 70% licensure rate for a PsyD is especially concerning. Just as long as we're concerned about accurate information.
     
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  22. psych.meout

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    "Fake news?" Seriously?

    As Wisneuro put so well, your "accurate info" is the same misleading BS offered by these expensive, poor quality programs that try to trick prospective students by either citing their overall match rate, not their accredited match rate, or downplaying the importance of accredited matches.
     
  23. HelloClarise

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    Is this based on data, or some unwritten rule? I will certainly plead ignorance if such is truly the case. I know many colleagues that simply wanted to become private practitioners and didn’t even seek out accredited internships, opting for more psychodynamically-inclined internships that don’t have to jump through the APA standardization hoops.
     
  24. HelloClarise

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    What did I say that was misleading? I’m not equating accredited and non-accredited internships. Some simply don’t seek out accredited internships even with knowledge of the consequences. Depending on goals, there is variability in the “importance of accredited matches,” and this is coming from someone who went through one.
     
  25. psych.meout

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    It's based on logic. You have one chance to do an internship and if you don't do an accredited one, it permanently locks you out of many employers (which are generally those with better pay and benefits, e.g., AMCs and VAs) and allows those who would still employ you to take advantage of this fact (i.e., you have very few places else to go) to subject you to substandard remuneration.

    If you know what the consequences are for unaccredited internships, you'd be stupid to not go for an accredited internship. Just because you want to be in private practice now doesn't mean you will always want to be, nor does it mean it's a wise decision to permanently close off your career options. Furthermore, if you really just want to do private practice therapy, it would be much smarter to go for a master's level degree and licensure. Depending on the state, there are marginal differences in reimbursement, which are far eclipsed once you factor in the debt level of programs like Rosemead. Just do the math on the monthly student loan payments for that much debt.

    Are they really "not seeking out" accredited internships or is that just what they say after they don't receive any interview offers to accredited sites?

    Yeah, that variability comes from people who don't understand the gravity of not matching to an accredited site and those who didn't match, but rationalize it as not important to their "goals."
     
  26. HelloClarise

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    Narrowly-focused maybe, but stupid?
    If reimbursement and money is your main motivation. Money is generally a huge factor, but for some not the preeminent one. A huge factor that many Rosemead grads value is the personal growth via going through their own psychotherapy, taking theologically integrated course material, psychotherapy and assessment lab training, and the supportive community found at Rosemead.

    “Are they really "not seeking out" accredited internships or is that just what they say after they don't receive any interview offers to accredited sites?”

    I’d hypothesize this is genuinely a significant part of the apparent disconnect between our views and likely the cultures we are coming from. I can say without much doubt having seen a rather large sample size of Rosemeaders go through the program, that many apply to more non-accredited than accredited internships with private practice specifically in mind. This has shifted somewhat with the recent increase in availability of APA internships.

    Some of it may be a learned helplessness of not even wanting to compete with more known or prestigious programs. Regardless of internship, Rosemead grads are known in the LA/OC area for producing really quality practitioners in psychotherapy and assessment.

    A side note... Is it fair to assume with the increase in availability of APA accredited internships and subsequent decrease in the imbalance, utilizing this as a distinguishing metric is losing its validity in assessing the quality of an institution?
     
    #4175 HelloClarise, Apr 26, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
  27. psych.meout

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    If you want personal growth through psychotherapy, you can go to a psychologist or counselor on your own. You don't need to pay more than $100,000 in tuition alone to get that experience.

    Furthermore, lots of doctoral programs are very supportive without costing an arm and a leg like this. My program is fully funded and incredibly supportive.

    You can be as idealistic as you want, but there are still bills to pay and education debt to be repaid. Hamstringing your career options and earning potential seems like an especially problematic thing to do if you attended an unfunded program.

    Huh, how interesting that students from a relatively non-competitive program are shifting to APA accredited internships now that there are significantly more of them available than six years ago at the height of the "internship crisis." It's almost like your students apply to non-accredited sites to hedge their bets against not matching to an APA accredited site, but are somewhat pulling back from that now that there are more sites available.

    So, your program and its community are so "supportive," but not enough to make substantive changes to do something about this?

    Ah, so not only are you often restricted in terms of setting/context, but you're also geographically restricted to an oversaturated area? How fun!

    Nope, it's even more important now. At least when there were more applicants than accredited sites, a student and/or program could attribute their match problems to simply demand outstripping the supply. Other, more competitive programs and applicants may have beat them out, but it didn't necessarily mean they were of poor quality.

    Once the supply exceeds demand, that explanation largely goes away. The important thing to understand is that sites don't have to rank applicants. If they feel an applicant is a poor fit or doesn't have sufficient education and training, they don't have to rank that applicant at all, which means that the applicant will not be considered as a match to their site. If you look at the stats for this past cycle, there were APA accredited sites with slots that went unfilled.

    Thus, if a program is consistently having a difficult time matching a significant portion of its students in this climate, it means that there is something wrong with the program and the training being provided to their students.
     
  28. HelloClarise

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    I may have asked for this with the fake news jab, but your tone... yikes

    Maybe it’s idealism, but it seems like it’s more just accepting that we have different values and perspectives. I reiterated the expense part and that is something everyone considering a program such as Rosemead should take an honest look at.

    Regarding the shift, I was thinking more that some of the programs are now just getting accredited, not that the applications are moving. I imagine it’s a complex picture.

    I offered a possible interpretation. Maybe they are making “substantive changes.” Both programs are at 80% APA match rate the last two years, so that seems promising as well. The patronizing responses are helpful though.

    Only restricted due to lack of being known. Rosemead is more known in SoCal and the west coast, just like Adelphi or The New School are more well known in NYC and northeast. Sure, there are names that transcend, but that was my point.

    And to your last point, I see what you’re saying. I’m not convinced places wouldn’t consider applicants from places they wouldn’t have normally, if not just based on lack of familiarity or name recognition, and applicants from places such as Rosemead get a chance. Time will tell.

    Hope I’m clear in conceding the point if we are talking match rates meaning APA, Rosemead (the PsyD at least) needs improvement, but I’m optimistic considering the last two years.
     
  29. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Plenty of data out there supporting this. One being that the largest employers of psychologists institutionally will not hire people without accredited internships. Also, there are tons of psychodynamically oriented internships that still adhere to APA accreditation guidelines. It's no excuse. Feel free to provide opinion and some data, but to call out someone for "fake news" for merely pointing out statistics that actually exist and are accurate is duplicitous.
     
    #4178 WisNeuro, Apr 27, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2018
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  30. YoungFrancis

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    I'm struggling with your attachment to this program. Based on your career goals, it seems fairly clear that a masters would be the best route. Everything you like about Rosemead can be found at a different program. An expensive PsyD with mediocre match rates is a trap for students who are misinformed. If private practice is your goal, a doctorate is not worth your time, and in the case of Rosemead, the expensive price tag. The supportive community and personal therapy that Rosemead offers can be found everywhere.
     
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  31. HelloClarise

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    I have openly admitted there are consequences that should be considered. I would challenge the notion that there are "tons of psychodynamically oriented internships." That is just not true and we literally had a discussion about this at Division 39 last week. And yes, my fake news comment would only be justified if we were considering APA+APPIC internships. The discussion then leads to the value of APA internships and the restrictions in place for not having one.

    The original comment said the PhD and PsyD programs both have "poor match rates," which I would still contest, especially for the PhD program.

    I don't know where I mentioned my career goals. If my attachment hasn't been inferred, it's that I have completed the program, found it immensely valuable and worth it (maybe some financial cognitive dissonance is at play), and would recommend it highly, after an honest look at finances has taken place. I didn't have trouble getting an APA internship, the EPPP went smoothly, and I've had no trouble finding jobs.

    "Everything you like about Rosemead can be found at a different program." This is simply not true. There are only 6 APA-accredited institutions that explicitly incorporate issues of Christian faith into their program. Programs that require students go through there own psychotherapy are in the increasing minority. I don't doubt there are highly supportive programs out there that are secular, more research-focused, and well-known. I would, however, argue Rosemead offers something unique and valuable, particularly to someone who wants to incorporate their worldview into their learning environment and community, but that you all may see it differently.

    Overall, I don't think I have offered anything misleading, Rosemead is doing increasingly well in APA-internships, and I just wanted to offer prospective students a different perspective from someone who actually went through the program. I realize I am in the minority here and I can accept that.

    The anonymity here does seem to breed a condescending and haughty environment, but I can deal ;).
     
  32. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    Challenge away, I can name 4 VAs and an AMC off the top of my head with strong psychodynamic components that are also APA accredited. I'd be a little surprised if the only ones out there are the ones that I have had direct exposure to. There are plenty of places that offer both CBT and dynamic supervision and experiences. And many of them are APA accredited.

    You can contest away about the "poor" label, and I guess it does matter whet you see as poor. But, even when there were many more applicants than spots, a sub 80% was seen as poor, sub 70 was seen as abysmal. In the new era of more spots than applicants, anything less than 90% is pretty much unacceptable. Also, the consistency of a program's match rates matter. While they may have had one year that would be considered "good," it doesn't erase the previous decade of "poor to abysmal." If they can keep it up, great, but one data point does not a trend make.
     
  33. HelloClarise

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    Fair enough. Thanks for the dialogue. Hopefully, we will be in the good-enough range soon. No one wants to be poor or abysmal. Those adjectives do seem rather harsh.
     
  34. WisNeuro

    WisNeuro Board Certified Neuropsychologist
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    They're just adjectives. You can sugar coat it, or be blunt about it. Either way, the actual numbers are there for potential applicants to view for themselves. And, in an era with more internship spots than applicants, low numbers are that much more telling.
     
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  35. MrGoodmorning

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    Okay, reading this has me searching for advice, as I feel I lack all the experience I need. I am in my third year of my B.A and this is where I am at, interested in Neuropsych (looking at mainly Psy.D programs, but browsing the forums has me adding some Ph.Ds to my list as well):



    No GRE yet, will study and take next semester, if possible.


    GPA of 3.6 overall

    Relevant courses:
    Abnormal Psychology (B)
    Electrophysiology (currently enrolled)
    Psychopharmacology (currently enrolled)
    Lifespan Development (A)
    Social Psychology (A)
    Biological Psychology (A)
    Physiological Psychology (A)
    Health Psychology (A)
    Peak Performance Psychology (A)
    And many more Psy classes that aren't too relevant.

    Research experience (my main fear):
    Will have a summer of research with a Sociology professor (as I initially planned on double-majoring and signed up for this over a year ago), but that is all


    Clinical Experience:
    Over six months of behavioral therapy work with autistic children, currently searching for a drug inpatient clinic to volunteer at.



    That's really it, I have been so caught up with working full time to make rent/tuition that I feel I am gravely lacking in research. Also, the counselors here have been hyping my work thus far up as though I was on track to actually have a chance at getting into a good Ph.D program (which I now realize is improbable) - so, where to go from here?
     
  36. psych.meout

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    You definitely need more research experience and your time would be far better spent doing that than volunteering at a substance abuse program. Clinical experience can be helpful, but there are few jobs at the undergraduate level where you can get the requisite experience for it to be really worth your time.

    You also need to understand that you don't need to have this all done by the time you graduate. It's very common to get admitted after taking a couple of years to build up your CV after you finish undergrad. E.g., in my cohort, less than 1/3 came in straight from undergrad. The rest had psychology related jobs of some kind (mostly RAs and psychometrists) before getting admitted.
     
  37. wtfook

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    I would second what Psych.Meout said. My cohort is 6 people and there is only one person who came straight from undergrad. All the rest took AT LEAST one year off. It's likely the same, if not more true in PsyD programs where people might come in with master's degrees, who are older and looking for a career change, etc... Programs like to see research experience AND they like to see maturity (after all it is a 5-7 year commitment). Time out of undergrad to figure our life out, decide on what you REALLY want to be researching for the next 5-7 years, and getting more specific with your goals makes you a) a more attractive candidate and b) a better adjusted individual.

    There is NO RUSH at all to run straight into a PhD post undergrad and you will be no less competitive because there was time between degrees. I would emphasize this especially if you don't have the research experience by next fall to make you an attractive candidate during the application process. If you're already working really hard to pay for school and stay afloat, you don't want waste the easily over $1000 it'll take just to apply. I am not exaggerating. Application fees are typically 50-100 dollars and most people apply to at least 10 programs. Then add in the cost of taking the GRE and you'll be dumping at least $1000 into a rushed process that you will likely have to do again, unless you decide to go to an unfunded program where you'll wrack up >100k in debt. Keep in mind, that $1000 is just applying. That doesn't include travel costs for interviews.

    Not trying to scare you man. Just saying. Take your time. Haste makes waste. Go find a neuropsych lab if that's what you enjoy. Decide WHAT within neuropsych you want to research. It wont matter if you go PsyD or PhD. All programs require a dissertation and all well rounded programs will have a fair emphasis on research and practice.
     
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  38. MrGoodmorning

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    Thank you both, I am worried about the impact the 5-7 years will have on my life and maybe a year off to evaluate my circumstances would be better for me. I'll definitely keep this in mind.
     
  39. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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    I'm sorry you've been on the receiving end of some well-intentioned but bad advice. Here's what to do:

    1. Try to get a volunteer research assistant role at a psychology lab, beginning this summer or at least next fall. If you do your homework you can probably find out what the "good" labs are. Who is getting undergraduate research awards or honors, and which labs are they involved in? Which labs include undergraduates on conference presentations? These are good things to find out before you commit to a lab. You may not be able to get involved in higher-level activities right away, but you also don't want to get into a lab that has a reputation for treating their RAs as data entry clerks and nothing more.

    2. Looking beyond graduation, try to find a research coordinator position or similar paying job where you might have an opportunity to co-author conference presentations and publications. Exhaust every avenue, including your school's career services center, job boards, word of mouth, etc.

    3. Do very well on the GRE.

    4. Do clinical volunteer work if it is personally important to you AND you have time for it (ie, time left over after doing all of the above), but don't invest the time because you think it's going to help your application. This isn't like applying to medical school. You are allowed to be more focused in your interests.
     
  40. MrGoodmorning

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    Thank you very much for the advice as well, I already emailed several research labs to figure out if there are any openings and will continue with my Sociology reaearch for now (as it's too late to apply for the Summer). I do hope I can be a strong candidate, but I know I have not been doing as much as I could during these past three years.


    Clinical work is really my only interest, but I know without research I am nothing to an admissions coordinater.
     
  41. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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    That's OK! You should still be a competent consumer of research no matter your career interests in the field. It's essential to know how we know what we know, if you know what I mean. ;) Good luck!
     
  42. Fiona18psych

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    Hi everyone! I will be applying to clinical and counseling programs this Fall. Please see my stas and experiences below and let me know your genuine thoughts. Tough love needed LOL! Thank you!!! I will apply to 3-4 masters programs as backups, but I'm currently reconsidering applying to PhDs because I think my chances are slim...

    Undergrad GPA: 3.85. I graduated in 3 years and currently on my gap year.

    GRE: I haven't taken it yet, but I'll take it as many times as needed, so it won't likely to be an issue.

    GRE Psych: 730/85thpercentile. I will probs take it again in October.

    LORs: I will ask two PhD mentors from research labs who know me well and are in the same field I want to pursue in grad school. I'm still thinking about the third recommender.

    Research experience: I've worked in 6 labs since 1st year of college. I had experiences in almost every aspect of research, and I had built great relationships with two mentors. But I have no independent research experience or senior thesis.

    Presentations/publications: I presented at one school conference (oral presentation, 1st author) and one national conference (poster, 2nd author). I'm currently helping one mentor prepare posters and papers, so I might have more authorships before applying; however, I won't be 1st or 2nd authors on any of them.

    Clinical experience: I volunteered at a psychiatric clinic for one year and interned at a pediatric clinic for six months. I'm currently working as an ABA therapist for kids with autism. My supervisor will likely write me a strong letter on my clinical skills.
     
  43. Sharewithme

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    Hi,

    I'm interested in applying for APA accredited Ph.D. counseling psychology programs and starting a program the Fall 2019 term. I'd like to team up with others interested in doing this so we can focus on preparing ourselves well and applying to programs that are likely our best fits. Rather than being scared at competing, I think we can help each other well by figuring out what the field of counseling psychology is about and getting ready to hopefully enter it! I searched this WAMC thread starting with posts from people in 2018 to find people interested in applying for Ph.D. counseling psych programs, and some people seem to be interested in just this while others seem to be interested in applying to other doctoral programs. Focusing on the Ph.D. counseling psych programs we want to apply for, @studentofthemind, @DCDMB, @PlatoPsychology, @Caps1001, and @Fiona18psych are you interested in teaming up? You can still apply for whatever other programs you want to apply for, too :)

    I also started a thread called "Working Together To Apply For Grad Programs". @MalphasTheCrow and @freeprozac are also interested in applying for Ph.D. counseling psychology programs, and I'd love for you, @MalphasTheCrow and @freeprozac, to be part of this Ph.D. counseling psychology Fall 2019 admissions year team, too!

    Am I missing anyone? Also, who else wants in? Joining is open. Anyone is free to join or leave at anytime. We can communicate via SDN public posts, personal messages, Facebook, email, anything we want.

    Thanks,
    Sharewithme
     
  44. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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    You're doing OK. Definitely apply this fall. Look for faculty who are a strong research fit. Try not to limit yourself too much geographically. Other thoughts:

    1. You've had a variety of research experiences, but do you have a record of progressively more responsible/autonomous work as an RA? Can you tell a story about your research experiences that relates to your reasons for seeking a PhD? Can you contribute to a manuscript in preparation at the level of an author? If you haven't talked to your PI/lab supervisor recently about this, now's the time. I wouldn't worry too much at this point about "independent" research experience, but if you have an opportunity to take on a larger role in the project, now's the time to act on it.

    2. Don't bother retaking the psych GRE. Very few programs care about it. Focus your efforts on the general GRE, the one that matters.

    3. You have some nice clinical experiences, more than enough. You can quit when it's feasible to do so, and focus more time on research and GRE prep.

    4. Can you get a paying job as a research coordinator or similar? If you are working in a lab where you can get some authorship/co-presenter opportunities, that's probably a better fit than a master's given your good grades.
     
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  45. propsych

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    This is a pretty long and demanding post, but any answers to even one or two of my questions are greatly appreciated. This community has been so helpful and kind and I am very grateful for your feedback and support! :)

    I posted here last year, and now I have more updated information and many questions. Looking for advice and your thoughts.

    I am graduating in about two weeks. First 2 years of college were very rough, had a 2.1gpa. Last 2 years I got straight A's and should be graduating with a 3.015 or something like that.

    Taking a year off (applying this Fall for next year)

    So:
    Overall GPA 3.0
    Psychology Major GPA 4.0
    Last 60 credits GPA 4.0
    Survey research Minor GPA 4.0

    GRE: Should take end of Summer. Let's assume I do well (160 ish)

    Research Experience:
    -RA for 2 years in same lab, Lab manager for 1 year
    -IRBs, Lit Reviews, Designed 3 studies (currently collecting data, one is a test-retest, 2nd is a look on the effects of expectations on task performance and subjective experience, and 3rd will begin next fall once test-retest data is analysed), Coordinating/training/hiring RAs, Ppt recruitment,
    -6th author on APS poster
    -2nd author on oral presentation local conference
    -1st author on poster local conference
    -NSF REU fellowship
    -sole author on REU presentation
    -(Once data starts coming in will be 1st author on a couple more posters)
    -May be 4th author on a pub (not sure it will be published as its for a study done a few years ago that only has 5 within subject ppts.- but I'm happy to get the experience of writing)
    -If all goes well in the Fall, I would be 2nd author on the paper based on that study/data and
    -1st author on another poster or two
    - 6 month internship working for a company that offers court appointed alternative to incarceration for drug related crimes. (Not really an interest of mine, but a good experience)


    As of now, I am trying to get a job as a research assistant during this year off. I will be buying Magoosh, and studying for the GRE. Will also be trying to figure out data analysis as this is my weakness currently in terms of skill.

    Questions:

    1) How do I make make myself more marketable to research labs looking for a research coordinator during my job hunt?

    2) What are my chances if I apply this Fall? Should I even bother? Or just wait another year?

    3) Any suggestions on how to improve my application?

    4) Would getting a Master's degree of some sort and raising my GPA be better than just taking more time out to do research?

    5) Any GRE tips?

    6) If I cannot get a paid job in research, what route do you think I should take? Perhaps I could get a job as a case manager or the like, and continue remotely supervising the study that will begin in the fall.

    *I will remain in my current lab as the supervisor of this study regardless of the job I get

    7) Should I look into getting more clinical experience?

    8) Does anyone have any suggestions/resources for learning how to use SPSS/ selecting statistical analyses based on study design/what you are looking for.
     
  46. psych.meout

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    This probably isn't what you want to hear, but your GPA is too low to be very competitive for most funded programs. Your upward trajectory is great, but even if you killed it on the GRE (though this isn't something you should assume or take for granted), it still will be an uphill battle. Some programs have official or unofficial GPA cutoffs that you won't make. At others that don't have hard cutoffs, you just won't be competitive compared to other applicants with higher GPAs.

    A terminal master's program with a research thesis requirement (e.g., experimental or clinical psychology) would really help you demonstrate your academic aptitude and give you more opportunities for research.
     
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  47. MamaPhD

    MamaPhD Psychologist, Academic Medical Center
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    Word of mouth goes a long way. If your PI knows people, use those connections. Use your school's career center. Network aggressively.

    You have a lot of good experience, it's mainly the GPA that hurts you. If you really crush the GRE and get strong glowing recommendation letters then I think it's maybe a bit of long shot but still worth applying. Just know that the GPA will be an issue regardless. Consider including some master's program applications with your doctoral applications.

    As a not-ideal-on-paper candidate your letters and statement will need to make it very clear that you are awesome, capable, thoughtful, and a good fit. It will all come down to fit, fit, fit.

    Possibly. But only spend your $$ on a master's program that has a good track record of sending students on to PhD programs.

    Create, and stick to, a study schedule. It's not rocket science but you need to study. Take practice tests. Buy or borrow study guides from the major test prep companies - each will have a different take on the content.

    Something quant-ish would be a good alternative.

    No.

    Try Coursera or Udemy. There are some good books on SPSS also. Get mentoring from someone in your lab who knows more about this than you do.
     
  48. Fiona18psych

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    Thank you so much! This is really helpful!!

     
  49. Sharewithme

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    I'd like to maybe applying for some master's programs this year, too. A good track record of sending students to PhD programs makes strong sense. I'd be looking for master's programs that send students to PhD counseling psychology programs. Is there a good number of students sent to PhD programs that you suggest going by?
     
  50. propsych

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    Thanks for the feedback. Do you know any good master's programs that are more research based and not too expensive? Would my gpa prevent me from getting into a master's program as well?
     
  51. propsych

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    Wow thanks so much for your input. Are there any resources for learning which programs have the best rate of movement into phd programs?

    I will definitely be applying to Master's programs as well, however, hearing some of these responses is making me concerned that I wouldn't even be able to get admitted into a master's program now.
     

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