Weight gain during residency

Discussion in 'Clinical Rotations' started by dr.evil, Jun 16, 2002.

  1. dr.evil

    dr.evil Senior Member
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    On a lighter note, I was wondering if anyone has any insight on whether I'm going to blow up like a blimp or look more like a toothpick after my 5 years of residency.

    There seems to be multiple schools of though: Either not enough time to workout so therefore you get fat; Not enough time to eat well, so therefore you're eating junk and getting fat; Or not enough time period so you skip so many meals that you get skinny (unlikely).
     
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  3. NuMD97

    NuMD97 Senior Member

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    Originally posted by Peustow:

    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif"> I was wondering if anyone has any insight on whether I'm going to blow up like a blimp or look more like a toothpick after my 5 years of residency. </font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">The WHOLE residency? I was told it was "only" the first year. If that is so, then "abandon hope all who enter here." :D
     
  4. LaCirujana

    LaCirujana Smoking Gun

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    My fellow general surgeon-to-be:
    At my school, the surgery interns were emaciated (no time to eat, period), the PGY 2-3's were about normal weight, but kind of squishy (no time to work out, barely time to eat and then only junk). Then the research residents were really, really fit--lots of them ran marathons/did Ironman triathlons during their research years. The 4's and 5's varied--some of them were fitness nazis--I ran stairs with one of them on trauma call, just because we were bored (instead of sleeping <img border="0" alt="[Wowie]" title="" src="graemlins/wowie.gif" /> )! Others got a little "fluffy." I guess it all depends on you. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" />
     
  5. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    It seems here that most of us gain weight until you go into the lab when you have plenty of time to work out. On some rotations we've had pretty low censuses and several junior residents (ie, Transplant) and I could make it to the gym everyday - but most of the time I haven't had enough time to work out and consequently have gained a fair bit of weight, which most of the seniors say they did as well.

    If you have an in-hospital gym you might be able to salvage some fitness out of your residency. <img border="0" title="" alt="[Wink]" src="wink.gif" /> Bringing healthy foods to snack on will also be of tremendous help because fresh fruits and veggies and low cal snacks are generally hard to come by.
     
  6. Sevo

    Sevo Senior Member
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    </font><blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">quote:</font><hr /><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Originally posted by Kimberli Cox:
    <strong>It seems here that most of us gain weight until you go into the lab when you have plenty of time to work out. On some rotations we've had pretty low censuses and several junior residents (ie, Transplant) and I could make it to the gym everyday - but most of the time I haven't had enough time to work out and consequently have gained a fair bit of weight, which most of the seniors say they did as well.
    </strong></font><hr /></blockquote><font size="2" face="Verdana, Helvetica, sans-serif">Also a factor at play: whether or not your hospital pays for your food.

    During my interviews, I was "warned" somewhat half-heartedly at the few places that gave their residents free reign at the cafeteria that "if you match here, you will gain weight here."
     
  7. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Unfortunately (or fortunately) they only give us meal cards for when we are on call. They typically cover me but for some of the bigger guys, there isn't enough funds to pay for 3 meals on the cards.
     
  8. ICUDOC

    ICUDOC Member

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    Staying fit and healthy is difficult in any residncy, let alone a gen surg one. My intern year was tough. But I worked out at every chance I got. Ran at least 4 days/week in the park as well as the gym. It takes committment, and sometimes I was hitting the weights at 10pm post call. It is all a matter mentality. I was a college athlete, so maybe it was easier for me. I actually put on a little more muscle and lost some fat sa an intern. Mostly caus Iwas no longer surfing thebar scene, as least not 3 nights/week.
    In terms of hospital food, stay away from most of it. Lots of carbs= lots of fat gain. I carry aound a couple of met Rx bars at all times, it only takes 30 seonds to inhale one. Don't let those fat bastards tell you they have no time to work out, and thus get fat. It is harder, but you just got to make an effort. As well, with the new hour limits, if they actually take efect, that would be about 30 hours less/week than I worked my first 3 years. Days off post call???? Will be nice....
     
  9. dr.evil

    dr.evil Senior Member
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    Ahh, I was afraid of the aspect that I may gain some poundage. I've put on a few pounds over the last month because I haven't make time to consistently work out and have been eating horribly (BTW, does everyone agree that moving sucks badly?).

    Hopefully I'll be a bit more disciplined when the madness begins.
     
  10. OSUrulz

    OSUrulz Junior Member

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    I did the running thing until I tore my right medial meniscus. I get the scope in two days. In 3 months I have put on about ten pounds. The bad thing is, I was a fairly muscular dude, and always carried a few extra pounds for my frame due to weightlifting. My advice is this: Unless you are a bodybuilder that competes, put down the heavy weights and go for low-impact cardio.

    I will be an anesthesia resident starting in July. My residency is probably not as strenuous as some others, so maybe I will regain my 19 year old body!!!

    Rulz
     
  11. hosskp1

    hosskp1 Senior Member

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    As a medical student-- I have seen really fit surgery residents and interns and I have seen just as many fat slobs. I think it depends on the resident and the program. Working out is something you have to make time for. I have the same concern about residency myself. Most of the residents and attendings have said that it is up to the individual. I hope I make enough time for it myself.
     

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