equivet

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Hi Everyone,
I was wondering if any of you out there applied and interviewed at Western, the new vet school. I havent heard back yet, but I was wondering what you guys out there (including current vet students) think of their program and reputation. I actually loved their program when I interviewed, I am just worried about them since they are so new, and have the provisional accred.
Thanks guys,
Bree

(I posted this one in the interview thread also)
 

ghostsamurai

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equivet said:
Hi Everyone,
I was wondering if any of you out there applied and interviewed at Western, the new vet school. I havent heard back yet, but I was wondering what you guys out there (including current vet students) think ...
(I posted this one in the interview thread also)
Hey EquiVet.
I interviewed at Western also. I talked to some of my colleagues who are veterinarians and they have varying opinions of the vet school. Most of the vets in CA are careful to criticize the program because in the end, vets are vets no matter where you get your degree. To me, what personally matters is whether someone is: 1) genuinely committed to the profession, 2) sufficiently competent to manage a case (or to have the self-awareness to defer), 3) proficient in the skills to properly manage such a case, and 4) communicates well, and is able to work/get-along with co-workers and colleagues.

About my impressions of the school, I liked Western. I have my reservations, like everyone applying and interviewing there, but overall I think Western is going to be a good school in the future. My biggest concern centers around the uncertainty of the school's "newness." The things I would settle my anxiety would be a more establish faculty, a centralized teaching hospital, and tried and proven curriculum. From what I can surmise about the curriculum based on anecdotal evidence is that the Problem Based Learning (PBL) process is the "en-vogue" way to teach and learn. It has has been very effective for some people (i.e. those who work well in groups) but may not be the best learning environments for others. It is also interesting to note that PBL is being taught in a variety of school from high school to other professional schools.
Regarding the lack of a centralized teaching hospital, I think its a double-edged sword. With experience in a variety of local clinics, students may be well prepared for the "art" of veterinary medicine (i.e. the varying methods and protocols for different vets/clinics) upon graduating, however it could also serve as a void/hinderance for vet students who seek to learn about rare and unique cases. It would be nice to have clinical faculty however Western vet students will have to take the initiative to connect with clinicians in the field who could serve and mentor them.

In summary, the school is essentially set up to produce "traditional" veterinary medical doctors who aspire to work-in/manage/own a private practice. From my limited perspective, Western U is going to help alleviate the problem of shortage of vets in Los Angeles/SoCal area. If you're solely interested in being the "traditional" veterinarian, Western should be an option for you. I personally feel because of the abundance of resources in CA, particularlly LA, and the variety of experiences available in the Los Angeles/SoCal area, Western will be a good option for applicants who want to be traditional vets in the future.

I often think of my 91yo family friend who was in the second graduating class of UCLA's undergrad, he always reminds me that there were only 4 building on campus when he graduated, now UCLA is bascially a city of its own.
But thats just what I think... :rolleyes:
 
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equivet

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thanks for your thoughts ghost sumurai!
I also wonder if 2 years of clinical rotations (which is so appealing) and only 2 years in foundation classes will cause a problem with board passage rates...
Bree:)

ghostsamurai said:

Hey EquiVet.
I interviewed at Western also. I talked to some of my colleagues who are veterinarians and they have varying opinions of the vet school. Most of the vets in CA are careful to outwardly criticize the program because in the end, vets are vets no matter where you get your degree. To me, what personally matters is whether someone is: 1) genuinely committed to the profession, 2) sufficiently competent to manage a case (or to have the self-awareness to defer), 3) proficient in the skills to properly manage such a case, and 4) communicates well, and is able to work/get-along with co-workers and colleagues.

About my impressions of the school, I liked Western. I have my reservations, like everyone applying and interviewing there, but overall I think Western is going to be a good school in the future. My biggest concern centers around the uncertainty of the school's "newness." The things I would settle my anxiety would be a more establish faculty, a centralized teaching hospital, and tried and proven curriculum. From what I can surmise about the curriculum based on anecdotal evidence is that the Problem Based Learning (PBL) process is the "en-vogue" way to teach and learn. It has has been very effective for some people (i.e. those who work well in groups) but may not be the best learning environments for others. It is also interesting to note that PBL is being taught in a variety of school from high school to other professional schools.
Regarding the lack of a centralized teaching hospital, I think its a double-edged sword. With experience in a variety of local clinics, students may be well prepared for the "art" of veterinary medicine (i.e. the varying methods and protocols for different vets/clinics) upon graduating, however it could also serve as a void/hinderance for vet students who seek to learn about rare and unique cases. It would be nice to have clinical faculty however Western vet students will have to take the initiative to connect with clinicians in the field who could serve and mentor them.

In summary, the school is essentially set up to produce "traditional" veterinary medical doctors who aspire to work-in/manage/own a private practice. From my limited perspective, Western U is going to help alleviate the problem of shortage of vets in Los Angeles/SoCal area. If you're solely interested in being the "traditional" veterinarian, Western should be an option for you. I personally feel because of the abundance of resources in CA, particularlly LA, and the variety of experiences available in the Los Angeles/SoCal area, Western will be a good option for applicants who want to be traditional vets in the future.

I often think of my 91yo family friend who was in the second graduating class of UCLA's undergrad, he always reminds me that there were only 4 building on campus when he graduated, now UCLA is bascially a city of its own.
But thats just what I think... :rolleyes:
 

ghostsamurai

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equivet said:
thanks for your thoughts ghost sumurai!
I also wonder if 2 years of clinical rotations (which is so appealing) and only 2 years in foundation classes will cause a problem with board passage rates...
Bree:)
Yes, a big concern. During my visit, I was not satisfied with the faculty's answer with regards to studying for the boards. I cannot comment at length because I do not know what other veterinary schools do to prepare their students for the boards.
Are you applying elsewhere?
 
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equivet

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Yea,
I was accepted to Massey but declined b/c of the international issue, waiting to hear from Iowa State and Oklahoma. I am a NJ resident so I applied to places that take some out of staters.
hows about you?


ghostsamurai said:
Yes, a big concern. During my visit, I was not satisfied with the faculty's answer with regards to studying for the boards. I cannot comment at length because I do not know what other veterinary schools do to prepare their students for the boards.
Are you applying elsewhere?
 

VeganSoprano

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Does anyone know how 3rd and 4th year rotations would work for a student who has pets and wouldn't have tons of freedom to live in a different city every few weeks?

Especially since Western has recently changed its prerequisites, it's looking more and more like the best option for me (no in-state or contract school option, animal protection background, animal rights leanings, not to mention recently dxed moderately severe ADHD). But if I can't guarantee that I'll be able to take care of my cats for all 4 years, it's just not going to be a possibility.
 

maddiemh

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VeganSoprano said:
Does anyone know how 3rd and 4th year rotations would work for a student who has pets and wouldn't have tons of freedom to live in a different city every few weeks?

Especially since Western has recently changed its prerequisites, it's looking more and more like the best option for me (no in-state or contract school option, animal protection background, animal rights leanings, not to mention recently dxed moderately severe ADHD). But if I can't guarantee that I'll be able to take care of my cats for all 4 years, it's just not going to be a possibility.
Hi Vegan,

I spoke to soon-to-be 3rd year Western students. They told me that Western tailors your rotations to wherever you live. They get your zip code and find strategic partners within the area of your home. In that sense, you are not moving around and unable to take care of your animals. The 2 students I spoke to pretty much told me that you have the autonomy to go wherever you want to do your rotation and can come back on campus when need be. These two students live far away from school. One of them had a multitude of animals and she, like you, wanted to make sure that she was around to take care of them.

Hopefully this helps.
 

chris03333

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They use your zip code for places that THEY determine for year 3.Third year is all required rotations. There is 2 rotations (at least for my class next year) which are in central CA, back to back (they are providing us housing for the time. The Fourth year you can go where you want as long as the site is approved by the school. As for taking care of your animals if you need to leave there are lots of people willing to help if you cannot take them with. Hope that clarifies some....back to studying I go three more days till break :)
Chris
maddiemh said:
Hi Vegan,

I spoke to soon-to-be 3rd year Western students. They told me that Western tailors your rotations to wherever you live. They get your zip code and find strategic partners within the area of your home. In that sense, you are not moving around and unable to take care of your animals. The 2 students I spoke to pretty much told me that you have the autonomy to go wherever you want to do your rotation and can come back on campus when need be. These two students live far away from school. One of them had a multitude of animals and she, like you, wanted to make sure that she was around to take care of them.

Hopefully this helps.
 

ghostsamurai

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equivet said:
Yea,
I was accepted to Massey but declined b/c of the international issue, waiting to hear from Iowa State and Oklahoma. I am a NJ resident so I applied to places that take some out of staters.
hows about you?
I am a CA resident. I applied to Davis, Western and a variety of other places across the country. :cool: Still waiting to hear from a few places. :(