Vulcan

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Hey all,

So I've been reading a lot of the threads about how much work Med School will be and I'm definitely still excited to begin, if humbled by the monstrous wall of work ahead.

I was wondering though...I've noticed many people posting about how Anatomy is the worst class ever and I certainly can see why considering how much work seems to be involved, but I am going to a school where the curriculum is divided by organ blocks, instead of subject blocks.

This makes anatomy seem less daunting IMO...even though I will now have to study multiple subjects for each block. I was curious as to some of the opinions on organ blocks versus subject blocks and how the studying approach changes.

I know that many of you will say that everyone's study habits are different, but I would like to see your opinions :)
 

TexasTriathlete

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Every school is like this for anatomy. You'll do head/neck one block, lower limb for another block, etc.

But don't worry about it. Part of being a med student is bitching about everything to make it seem like its 10x harder than it actually is. Just work hard. You'll be fine.
 

blackbird11384

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Hey all,

So I've been reading a lot of the threads about how much work Med School will be and I'm definitely still excited to begin, if humbled by the monstrous wall of work ahead.

I was wondering though...I've noticed many people posting about how Anatomy is the worst class ever and I certainly can see why considering how much work seems to be involved, but I am going to a school where the curriculum is divided by organ blocks, instead of subject blocks.

This makes anatomy seem less daunting IMO...even though I will now have to study multiple subjects for each block. I was curious as to some of the opinions on organ blocks versus subject blocks and how the studying approach changes.

I know that many of you will say that everyone's study habits are different, but I would like to see your opinions :)
I actually didn't like the organ block anatomy scheduling at my school because anatomy practicals wasn't "my thing". So, even though I rocked the written portion of every test, if there was a very difficult practical associated with it, it would bring my average down. So instead of having just one gross anatomy class that had a lower average, several of my blocks' averages were lowered.
 

SeminoleFan3

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I like the concept of organ-based systems teaching, but I definitely liked getting anatomy over all at once. It just gives you something to base things on. At my school, it's taught in about 2.5 months, then it's done with. But, to each his own.
 

freakystud

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i think i prefer subject blocks rather than organ blocks..its more focused and u dont have to study many subjects for exam. in organ blocks u have to cover anatomy,physio,patho,immuno etc.and lots of books for just one paper. like organ blocks in my school required very heavy work to pass.. however the integrations of subjects will be good for u in future.
 

Perrotfish

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A pure organ block ciriculum is sort of rare. Most schools that aren't are pure subject blocks at least run you through anatomy before they start the systems cirriculum. Does that mean that it will take you a full 2 years to finish disecting your cadaver?
 

ruralmd

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Does that mean that it will take you a full 2 years to finish disecting your cadaver?
No, once you begin learning the systems you begin dissecting and after you've completed the systems you have completed the dissection. So we were in the anatomy lab for a portion of the fall and the entire spring semester. So we spent most of the first year in the anatomy lab.
 

medstar21

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That's a lot time in the anatomy lab. Fortunately, we have a systems based curriculum, but we do anatomy the first semester while we do "fundamentals" which is all the basic science stuff. Then second semester we start getting into the systems. It seems weird to be in the anatomy lab for a whole year pretty much.
 
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Vulcan

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Thanks for all of the great posts :)

From what I can tell from last years schedule (ours is not up yet), anatomy labs are given 2-3 times each week for a few hours in the afternoon and it runs the entire year.

For example, during the GI block, it seems that they went through smaller portions of the GI anatomy every other day or so for that whole block, and simply applied that concept to each system as they went along. The cadaver is finished by the end of the first year, I think.
 
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As an incoming 1st year, my two biggest fears with biology practicals is

1. Its ambiguous which part they are trying to tag in practicals. I ran into this in undergrad all the time. They'd pin the back of a sheep's eye right around where the macula should be and want you to identify it as the retina which is the general anatomy part the macula is part of.

2. You don't know which general body part they're refering to. I guess this wouldn't be a fear for organ block classes. In anatomy lab (or as a doctor or in life really) you'd have alot more cues you don't even notice sometimes that are used to help identify parts that aren't available in practicals where schools chop up/cover up surrounding areas and only let you see a small area as a reference where one part is tagged.

BTW, for organ block classes, do you get new cadavers after awhile or do they especially preserve the one you get so it lasts the whole year?
 
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Vulcan

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As an incoming 1st year, my two biggest fears with biology practicals is

1. Its ambiguous which part they are trying to tag in practicals. I ran into this in undergrad all the time. They'd pin the back of a sheep's eye right around where the macula should be and want you to identify it as the retina.
They made you do practicals in undergrad? That stinks...I was the anatomy TA at my undergrad school and we never made students do that.
 

OPPforlife

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My class will be the first class at my school that will going through a "systems based" curriculum. I think it should be interesting, but that could also be because I am just over all excited about school. I do think that this will allow for fairer exams, because each exam will have a little, anatomy, biochem, physiology, histology and neuroscience. The balance I think will allow students like me (ones who are scared of the memorization) to do ok, since to my understanding physiology is less memorization and more to do with concepts? anyway...
 
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Vulcan

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I also think that the integration of the various subjects will help keep us focused on the system as a whole and how it interacts with everything else. I wonder if it's difficult to, for example, learn cardiovascular anatomy, and then go back and have to remember it all for physio, and then again for path, and so on...as opposed to doing all of them at once.
 

Jolie South

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I also think that the integration of the various subjects will help keep us focused on the system as a whole and how it interacts with everything else. I wonder if it's difficult to, for example, learn cardiovascular anatomy, and then go back and have to remember it all for physio, and then again for path, and so on...as opposed to doing all of them at once.
I agree with this. We covered every single aspect of a system at a time: histo, anatomy, physio, clinical exams, etc. The reinforcement really helped me learn it.