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What about the frigid Maine winters at UNECOM?

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - DO' started by roger2004, Oct 29, 1999.

  1. roger2004

    roger2004 Senior Member

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    Just got back from UNECOM and am more impressed with MUCH about this school than anywhere else I have interviewed so far. EVERY POSITIVE COMMENT ABOUT THE SCHOOL IS TRUE. If anything they are understatements. It also seemed to be a very cooperative environoment which I see as a real plus.
    I was wondering, however, what the winters are like at Biddeford. Is being snowbound, or icebound (worse) a regular, thing in New England? How about traveling in or out of the state in winter? Are there many problems with that- roads, flights etc? To a New Englander this may seem like a dumb question, but I haven't seen enough snow in the last four or five years to make one decent snowball.

    Again. UNECOM is a superlative school. All comments are appreciated.

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    rog
     
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  3. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Roger2004,

    Well speaking as a Michigander, it will cause problems. Maine is a bit farther North than us so I'm sure they get equivalent or more amounts of snow and ice as us. If you get enough snow the airports will close (this happened last january in detroit: people were stranded on the tarmac for about 9 hrs before the runway could be cleared to let them off.) Does it get that bad all the time? No. It varies, sometimes you just get a dumping one day, other times it just accumulates. It's the dumpings over a 24 hour period which cause problems.

    As for the roads, use some common sense and drive slowly. I don't care if you have ABS, traction control, etc.. You will slide! The biggest problem is the other drivers. In the northern states, we're so used to driving in that crap that it's second nature. Sure we have accidents, but many of us know how to control our cars (it takes practice). When it snows in southern states, it turn into complete chaos. Nobody knows how to drive in snow.

    I hope this helps, obviously you'll need a New Englander to give you the best info. I'm sure it's about the same though.



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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  4. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Rog,

    I almost forgot. Buy yourself a good ice scraper! I can not stress this enough. Not some dinky thing from Jersey. Wait till you get there and buy yourself a quality, sturdy scraper. I'd also recomend some de-icer for the door locks(depending on how old your car is). One more thing, if they salt the roads in Maine, be prepared to watch your car get eaten alive by the Rust Gods. Just make sure you periodically wash the salt off during the winter months. Be sure to wash UNDER the car as well. Just because the salts off the paint, doesn't mean your muffler and other vital METAL components aren't rusting away.

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  5. Rog- I am from Ma, but live only about 1 1/2 hr. from UNECOM, and have talked to a co-worker who is from Me. about the weather (I hate the cold..)He says it is not much diferent from Ma. And if it is like last year, it is cold (as usual), but snow interfered very little with daily going ons. With the fairly effcient snow clean up, you are not usually left 'snow-bound,' (morning compute can be a pain, but when in school, cancellation are always nice!)unless, like DG mentioned, it happens over a 2 day period. I would worry less about the snow, and more about the COLD (Did I mention I hate the cold?! [​IMG] There aren't usually storms after storms (maybe 5 major storms a year), In Me,. I was told, snow clean up is MUCH more efficient than Ma. There is salt on the road from Dec to about April, but I barely wash my car, and it has held up. I never de-ice (but my remote control car started does come in handy many a cold mornings...)
    As far as travel (which I do not do that much anyways)NE weather year round is always causing cancellations, but they still take off in the snow, only when it is very icy are there a lot of delays due to de-icing.
    I am very interested in hearing what you have to say about your interview, I am going up Nov. 9. I too have heard wonderful things about the school. Hope this has helped a bit..
     
  6. JamesBond

    JamesBond Junior Member

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    Get ready for the worst cold you have ever experienced in your life. The ice-cold Canadian winds come blowing down on us mercilessly. Traveling (for you)will be hazardous until you get acclimated to our weather. Snow will fall and fall and fall . . . You will need winter clothing, gloves, scarfs, cotton socks, boots, caps, spades (one in your car at all times), good tires . . . That's why i am leaving NE for the West. I have lived here all my life, and i am tired of it all. AZCOM here I come!
     
  7. Well... I gues I could be a little acclimated to the weather, but I do not think it is THAT bad! [​IMG] Don't scare Rog off! But I agree with Mr. Bond: I have had it with the cold too! Thank God I have a back-up school in Ca.

    P.S. What is a 'spade'?
     
  8. roger2004

    roger2004 Senior Member

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    Those descriptions of the weather sound most unappealing. I guess there's not much beach volleyball going on - ha ha! CAN YOU GET USED TO THAT WEATHER? IS THERE ANY UP SIDE TO IT? How's the skiing, or is it too cold for that? You're describing weather conditions that are potentially "survival threatening". I would have to be orientated to those conditions as I have never experienced anything like it. (which is probably not a bad thing!) Maybe that explains the very strong sense of student community I got when I visited. With that type of weather, I guess you're more dependent on your "neighbors" and are forced to be more cooperative/friendly just to get by - a type of "we're all in this together" attitude. Whatever the reason, I could not help but be struck with the overwelming comaraderie and friendliness of the students and faculty there. They made a tremendously positive impression on me. And yes, what is a "spade"? Thanks for your comments. I appreciate them.

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    rog

    [This message has been edited by roger2004 (edited 10-30-1999).]
     
  9. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    A spade is a shovel. Which is shaped like a spade. You know like playing cards: diamonds, clubs, hearts and SPADES.


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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004

    [This message has been edited by DocGibby (edited 10-30-1999).]
     
  10. DocGibby

    DocGibby Senior Member

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    Remember Rog, that which doesn't kill us only makes us stronger (I think?).

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    DocGibby
    MSUCOM class of 2004
     
  11. Rog - Honesly, it is not bad. Justa pain in the * when you have places to be on a storm, but everyone then has an excuse to stay home. You also seem to be getting opinions from people who seem to hate NE weather. You get used to it. The winter weather sneaks up on you gradually. Then there is skiing, ice skating, and warm cozy fire-sides. I have gone to school with many people from Ca. who never even saw snow, and they did not seem to mind the Winter (yet, then again, they knew they could always go home..)Where are you coming from Rog?

     
  12. roger2004

    roger2004 Senior Member

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    SMLynch and DocGibby
    I thought that was what a "spade" was! I certainly wouldn't rule out a school I was liked just because of weather. There has to be more in the equation than that, I'm sure you'll agree. However, the type of information you were generous enough to provide is just part of the learning curve for me. I'm from NJ and have spent time in Vermont skiing - when I had the time which wasn't often. It is a BEAUTIFUL state and the skiing was usually great.
    SMLynch. your description of a winter which gradually sneaks up on you and the skiing, ice skating, fireplaces part actually sounds very nice - not that I imagine the students at UNECOM really have time for much of that. I guess my main concern was being stranded or getting around on a daily basis. I think I'm fairly adaptable, so if I am offered an acceptance there, I won't be worrying about the weather. Again, thanks for your comments and good luck to you both.

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    rog
     
  13. Smile

    Smile Senior Member

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    rog,
    i live in southern new england and maine is not too far away from here. maine certainly gets more snow than us, but it really isn't as bad as some people are making it out to be. don't forget, people up there have been dealing w/ this kind of weather for many many years so they know how to handle life in the winters. second, i can tell you first-hand that the past two winters have been relatively mild. last winter we only had one real snow storm and about 4 ice-storms. and most winter the temps were in the 30's and only on a few occassions did they drop much further down. i really do believe that this whole global warming or after-effects of el nino have changed the weather patterns up around here. so i don't anticipate the weather will be that bad up there. also, don't forget, you'll be so high up in work that you probably won't even pay a whole lot of attention to the weather.
     
  14. strive

    strive Junior Member

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    Do not forget, UNECOM is right on the ocean. That huge thermal mass is always ABOVE FREEZING. Therefore, although the southern coast of maine is cold in the winter, it is much milder than the winter weather more inland. I have a good friend who is a fourth year student at UNECOM, she hates cold weather but says that the winters were not nearly as bad as she expected, just long in duration.
     

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