What are my chances for allopathic or osteopathic medical school?

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AmandaDelise

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Hello SDN community!

I'm applying this year for medical school and I would like your insight if whether or not I have a decent chance of getting in :)

Major: Biology
GPA: 3.98
sGPA: 3.98
MCAT: 505 :( I know this isn't the best!
Shadowing:
-General and Vascular surgery: 100
-Anesthesia:80 hours

Volunteering:
- Soccer coach for the youth 150 hours
-soccer coach for those with disabilities 150 hours
-Veteran's hosptial volunteer 300
- Peer mentor tutoring for freshmen in biology at my school, 2 semesters; 72 hours

Research:
-2 semesters of research- 1 poster at school symposium; 1st author; 150
Extra-curricular activities/hobbies:
-I was a student athlete for my school; I was on the soccer team
Experiences with leadership
-I was a resident assistant at my school
-I work for this soccer league as a field marshall (I make sure the league/games run smoothly)

I'm planning on going to Haiti after March on a mission trip (super excited!!!)
I graduated in 3 years so I feel like I rushed a lot of things, and that I don't have a lot of clinical experience or a lot of community service that involves medicine!

Besides my MCAT, what are things I can improve on?
Note: I"m not trying to go top tier schools, I'm simply trying to get accepted :)
Excited to hear your opinions!

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SDN Success Rate Charts - 2017 Edition
Suggests you have about a 60% chance (505 translates to a 28/29 on the old scale).

If you wanted to go to a top ranked school you could ease off the pedal for a year, study for the MCAT, have a little non-school experience, and be on your way.
 
SDN Success Rate Charts - 2017 Edition
Suggests you have about a 60% chance (505 translates to a 28/29 on the old scale).

If you wanted to go to a top ranked school you could ease off the pedal for a year, study for the MCAT, have a little non-school experience, and be on your way.
Hey!
Thank you for this! I'm actually planning on taking the exam again in March. I've been studying for a while now so I really hope I do better haha!
But again, thanks for the source and for your input :)
 
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Hello SDN community!

I'm applying this year for medical school and I would like your insight if whether or not I have a decent chance of getting in :)

Major: Biology
GPA: 3.98
sGPA: 3.98
MCAT: 505 :( I know this isn't the best!
Shadowing:
-General and Vascular surgery: 50 hours
-Anesthesia:40 hours
-Plastic Surgery: 75 hours
Volunteering:
- Soccer coach for the youth every since 9th grade roughly around 800 hours
- Peer mentor tutoring for freshmen in biology at my school, 2 semesters; 72 hours
Research:
-2 semesters of research- 1 poster at school symposium; 1st author; 408 hours
Extra-curricular activities/hobbies:
-I was a student athlete for my school; I was on the soccer team
Experiences with leadership
-I was a resident assistant at my school
-I work for this soccer league as a field marshall (I make sure the league/games run smoothly)

I'm planning on going to Haiti after March on a mission trip (super excited!!!)
I graduated in 3 years so I feel like I rushed a lot of things, and that I don't have a lot of clinical experience or a lot of community service that involves medicine!

Besides my MCAT, what are things I can improve on?
Note: I"m not trying to go top tier schools, I'm simply trying to get accepted :)
Excited to hear your opinions!
No patient contact experience? That will be lethal. My own student interviewers will eat you alive. Here's why:

What are you going to say when asked how you know you are suited for a life of caring for the sick and suffering? “That you just know”? Imagine how that will go over!
Here's the deal: You need to show AdComs that you know what you're getting into. We need to know that you're going to like being around sick or injured people for the next 40 years.

Here's another way of looking at it: would you buy a new car without test driving it? Buy a new suit or dress without trying it on??

We're also not looking for merely for good medical students, we're looking for people who will make good doctors, and 4.0 GPA robots are a dime-a-dozen.

I've seen plenty of posts here from high GPA/high MCAT candidates who were rejected because they had little patient contact experience.

Not all volunteering needs to be in a hospital. Think hospice, Planned Parenthood, nursing homes, rehab facilities, crisis hotlines, camps for sick children, or clinics.

Some types of volunteer activities are more appealing than others. Volunteering in a nice suburban hospital is all very well and good and all, but doesn't show that you're willing to dig in and get your hands dirty in the same way that working with the developmentally disabled (or homeless, the dying, or Alzheimers or mentally ill or elderly or ESL or domestic, rural impoverished) does. The uncomfortable situations are the ones that really demonstrate your altruism and get you 'brownie points'. Plus, they frankly teach you more -- they develop your compassion and humanity in ways comfortable situations can't.

The Haiti trip will be viewed as medical tourism.
 
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No patient contact experience? That will be lethal. My own student interviewers will eat you alive. Here's why:

What are you going to say when asked how you know you are suited for a life of caring for the sick and suffering? “That you just know”? Imagine how that will go over!
Here's the deal: You need to show AdComs that you know what you're getting into. We need to know that you're going to like being around sick or injured people for the next 40 years.

Here's another way of looking at it: would you buy a new car without test driving it? Buy a new suit or dress without trying it on??

We're also not looking for merely for good medical students, we're looking for people who will make good doctors, and 4.0 GPA robots are a dime-a-dozen.

I've seen plenty of posts here from high GPA/high MCAT candidates who were rejected because they had little patient contact experience.

Not all volunteering needs to be in a hospital. Think hospice, Planned Parenthood, nursing homes, rehab facilities, crisis hotlines, camps for sick children, or clinics.

Some types of volunteer activities are more appealing than others. Volunteering in a nice suburban hospital is all very well and good and all, but doesn't show that you're willing to dig in and get your hands dirty in the same way that working with the developmentally disabled (or homeless, the dying, or Alzheimers or mentally ill or elderly or ESL or domestic, rural impoverished) does. The uncomfortable situations are the ones that really demonstrate your altruism and get you 'brownie points'. Plus, they frankly teach you more -- they develop your compassion and humanity in ways comfortable situations can't.

The Haiti trip will be viewed as medical tourism.

Hey Goro!
Thank you for your input. I agree with what you say 100%. I'm extremely nervous about my patient experience. I had little experience when shadowing the general and vascular surgeon, as he would try and let me assess certain patients and talk to them (give them comfort) as well as translate for the ones who didn't speak English. But that's about it :( how do you think I should approach my patient experience? I truly have always wanted to get into it but found myself always working/studying/soccer. Do you believe I should start now? Or will admissions just think I'm doing it to complete a checklist since I've started late? That's what I fear the most, I don't want to seem like a robot :(
 
Hey I had alsmost the EXACT same academic merits as you. Except I had over 1000 hours of ECs related to healthcare and hundreds on Non health EC's. I so far have had 6 MD II and 4 DO II. Accepted to MD. It can be done but you need to show commitment to the medical field.
 
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Hey I had alsmost the EXACT same academic merits as you. Except I had over 1000 hours of ECs related to healthcare and hundreds on Non health EC's. I so far have had 6 MD II and 4 DO II. Accepted to MD. It can be done but you need to show commitment to the medical field.
Wow that is awesome to hear! I will definetly start working on my ECs in terms of healthcare and patient experience! Congratulations and I wish you the best :D
 
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