Jul 6, 2015
2
0
Status
Pre-Medical
I know that I am late in the application cycle, but I just got back my August MCAT scores and am trying to figure out if it is worth me applying this year. I am open to MD and DO schools.

Aug MCAT- 507, 74th percentile (126/127/124/130)...I know that is a lower bio score
Small private undergrad, Psychology Major Biology Minor
cGPA: 3.55
sGPA: 3.4-3.5
College varsity student athlete
completing research this year
only about 30 hours of shadowing
PA resident

Also if it is worth me applying, what schools to you think I should put on my list?
 

NotASerialKiller

2+ Year Member
Jul 7, 2015
1,457
6,866
Status
Medical Student
Don't submit this year. In addition to being late, from what you wrote you don't have any clinical experience (with patients) which is a very important part of the application. Also, do you not have any volunteering at all? That is a problem as well. You should get both of these things done this year so that you can apply next year with an early, well-rounded application. This is important for both MD and DO.
 

GrapesofRath

2+ Year Member
May 5, 2015
5,320
3,803
Status
Non-Student
It's fine for DO season but if you want to go for an MD wait until next year. The crucial thing to note here is DO NOT apply to DO's this cycle if you aren't willing to go to one and would apply again to MD again next year even if you got a DO offer. That's about the worst thing you could do.
 
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Faha

7+ Year Member
Sep 15, 2012
9,598
3,797
Status
Attending Physician
You are better off applying next June. By the time your application is verified in October you would then need to complete all your secondaries. The admissions committees would then review your application and by that time the majority of interview slots for this year have already been filled. If you apply in June with more clinical experience you will be competitive for most DO schools and some MD schools.
 
OP
K
Jul 6, 2015
2
0
Status
Pre-Medical
Don't submit this year. In addition to being late, from what you wrote you don't have any clinical experience (with patients) which is a very important part of the application. Also, do you not have any volunteering at all? That is a problem as well. You should get both of these things done this year so that you can apply next year with an early, well-rounded application. This is important for both MD and DO.
I have some volunteering.
30 hours in an ER (but that was end of senior year, summer before college so I do not think would apply).
I have probably 12 hours at one organization, but everything else is really sporadic so I do not know how to use it
 

md-2020

The Immaculate Catch
2+ Year Member
Jun 29, 2015
2,298
3,007
Status
Medical Student
I have some volunteering.
30 hours in an ER (but that was end of senior year, summer before college so I do not think would apply).
I have probably 12 hours at one organization, but everything else is really sporadic so I do not know how to use it
That's not nearly enough.


Plus it's extremely extremely late.
 

Goro

7+ Year Member
Jun 10, 2010
53,634
78,883
Somewhere west of St. Louis
Status
Non-Student
This not the application of a person who dearly wants to be a physician. It is the application of someone who wants to be a doctor as long as it is convenient.

Here's the deal: You need to show AdComs that you know what you're getting into, and show off your altruistic, humanism side. We need to know that you're going to like being around sick or injured people for the next 40 years.

Here's another way of looking at it: would you buy a new car without test driving it? Buy a new suit or dress without trying it on??

What are you going to say when asked how you know you are suited for a life of caring for the sick and suffering? “That you just know”? Imagine how that will go over!

We're also not looking for merely for good medical students, we're looking for people who will make good doctors, and 4.0 GPA robots are a dime-a-dozen.

I've seen plenty of posts here from high GPA/high MCAT candidates who were rejected because they had little patient contact experience.

Not all volunteering needs to be in a hospital. Think hospice, Planned Parenthood, Ronald McDonald House, nursing homes, rehab facilities, crisis hotlines, camps for sick children, or clinics.

Service need not be "unique". If you can alleviate suffering in your community through service to the poor, homeless, illiterate, fatherless, etc, you are meeting an otherwise unmet need and learning more about the lives of the people (or types of people) who will someday be your patients. Check out your local houses of worship for volunteer opportunities.

Examples include: Habitat for Humanity, Humane Society, crisis hotlines, soup kitchen, food pantry, homeless or women’s shelter, after-school tutoring for students or coaching a sport in a poor school district, teaching ESL to adults at a community center, Big Brothers/Big Sisters, or Meals on Wheels.

Some types of volunteer activities are more appealing than others. Volunteering in a nice suburban hospital is all very well and good and all, but doesn't show that you're willing to dig in and get your hands dirty in the same way that working with the developmentally disabled (or homeless, the dying, or Alzheimers or mentally ill or elderly or ESL or domestic, rural impoverished) does. The uncomfortable situations are the ones that really demonstrate your altruism and get you 'brownie points'. Plus, they frankly teach you more -- they develop your compassion and humanity in ways comfortable situations can't.




I have some volunteering.
30 hours in an ER (but that was end of senior year, summer before college so I do not think would apply).
I have probably 12 hours at one organization, but everything else is really sporadic so I do not know how to use it