bugsterizer83

huggle buggie
Sep 2, 2015
36
13
Background -

Started med school but took one year leave of absence for serious health reasons after just a couple days of class (didn't take any exams or anything)
Returned as part-time student the following year (did the part-time tract offered at our school due to on-going health and family reasons). Basically the way it works is your M1 year is taken over 2 years.
Did fine the Fall semester of M1 year 1.
I Failed anatomy class and histology class in Spring semester of M1 year 1. Passed the make-up histology exam over summer. Failed the make-up anatomy exam.
Because I was part-time M1 anyway, I retook Anatomy during my M1 year 2 (with the other classes I hadn't taken yet) and passed.
Would say my academic troubles end of first year highly related to medical and family issues on-going at the time.
Subsequently finished M1 and M2 with no academic problems.
USMLE Step I 225.

U.S. M.D. student - currently M3. Not at Ivy League/top 10 school or anything.
Very well-liked/personable. Doing well so far on clinical rotations.
Medical/family issues previously stated have been resolved for the past 2 years.

What can I do to match in anesthesiology? Or do I simply have no shot because of mediocre step I and previously stated red flags?

Thank you for your time.
 

woo

ASA Member
7+ Year Member
Jul 15, 2009
76
7
Status
Medical Student
I think you have a good shot. Biggest thing is you will have to explain yourself for your past failures during M1 year. However, it seems from your story that you may have a legitimate answer for that.
However, if you continue to do well during your M3 year, do well/better on Step 2, and maximize your extracurriculars, I don't see you having a problem with matching in anesthesiology.
You may need to get realistic with the programs you look at next year, however I'm sure you can re-evaluate that after your M3 year.
I would get a mentor at your school (an anesthesiologist), who is involved in academics, like a program director, etc, he or she will most likely give you the best advice possible.
 
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Wiscoblue

ASA Member
5+ Year Member
Feb 10, 2013
551
383
Status
Attending Physician
That is a good score on your step 1, given the hurdles that you have had to face. Now if I'm interviewing you for a residency spot I'm looking to see if you're smart, carry yourself well, and the letter from your mentor says that you have a good attitude. Having overcome all the hurdles might actually be looked upon as a favorable thing if you can assure me that you have no residual effects of whatever problem you had, especially in your attitude towards work and learning. Dream big. Don't sell yourself short.
 
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FFP

Wiseguy
Gold Donor
10+ Year Member
Oct 17, 2007
7,366
7,496
Status
Attending Physician
We are really concerned about your problems with anatomy and histology. Both are really important in the practice of anesthesia.
 
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IlDestriero

Ether Man
10+ Year Member
Nov 24, 2007
7,608
7,137
The ivory tower.
Status
Attending Physician
Probably good if you are healthy now and do well 3rd year. Do at least one month of anesthesia and kill it for a strong LOR.
 

Laryngophed

Supratentorial problems
10+ Year Member
Sep 4, 2007
2,692
892
TDC
Status
Fellow [Any Field]
I think you have a good shot. Biggest thing is you will have to explain yourself for your past failures during M1 year. However, it seems from your story that you may have a legitimate answer for that.
However, if you continue to do well during your M3 year, do well/better on Step 2, and maximize your extracurriculars, I don't see you having a problem with matching in anesthesiology.
You may need to get realistic with the programs you look at next year, however I'm sure you can re-evaluate that after your M3 year.
I would get a mentor at your school (an anesthesiologist), who is involved in academics, like a program director, etc, he or she will most likely give you the best advice possible.
There is some solid advice here. Study your tail off and do well on Step 2. Same for your clinical rotations. Do the little things well beyond the exams. Show up 15-30 minutes early every day, know your patients, have a plan with some thought put into it. Your residents and attendings will notice. Find an anesthesiologist who has been in the academic world for a bit and see if they will be your advisor. Be prepared to explain your red flags, why they occurred, how you recognized them, and most importantly, what you did to correct them and what you are doing to prevent them from re-occuring.