What are the main reasons why people still apply to pharmacy school even though there is an oversupp

Judgment Dragon

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What are the main reasons why people still apply to pharmacy school even though there is an oversupply of pharmacists in the USA?
 
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stoichiometrist

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Denial.
 

wagrxm2000

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Did you really not know the answer to that question? $$$ for an easy gig. Heck computers do most of the work.
 

BMBiology

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Where are you going to make 120 k at age 24 by working just 40 hours a week? Money is the main motivation.

It is still good money. You need to have a plan. It is not as easy as 2005.
 

rederza

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This question has been asked a lot. From what I can gather:

-People like me who did zero research about the profession before entering it. Learned my lesson. I research everything THOROUGHLY now. Seriously, throughout college I never once googled outlook of pharmacy, or the advancement, or the way it's turning out. I credit my naivety and laziness with it. It was a painfully expensive lesson.
-People who want to be health professionals but don't have good enough grades to do anything else
-People who really think they'll be cosmetic/medicine developers
-People who think it's the next best thing to being a doctor
-People who want the easy money for minimal work. When you're in college studying mundane things, the appeal of making 100+k handing out pills all day is very enticing.
-Foreigners, because pharmacy has the laxest standards out of any of the health doctoral programs


I definitely heard of a lot of "I wanted to be ___ or ____ but my grades were only good enough for this" when I was still a p student.
 
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Judgment Dragon

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Jul 2, 2011
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This question has been asked a lot. From what I can gather:

-People like me who did zero research about the profession before entering it. Learned my lesson. I research everything THOROUGHLY now. Seriously, throughout college I never once googled outlook of pharmacy, or the advancement, or the way it's turning out. I credit my naivety and laziness with it. It was a painfully expensive lesson.
-People who want to be health professionals but don't have good enough grades to do anything else
-People who really think they'll be cosmetic/medicine developers
-People who think it's the next best thing to being a doctor
-People who want the easy money for minimal work. When you're in college studying mundane things, the appeal of making 100+k handing out pills all day is very enticing.
-Foreigners, because pharmacy has the laxest standards out of any of the health doctoral programs


I definitely heard of a lot of "I wanted to be ___ or ____ but my grades were only good enough for this" when I was still a p student.
After you quit pharmacy school, what else did you do with your life?
 

rederza

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After you quit pharmacy school, what else did you do with your life?
Studying comp sci at a top 10 univ while applying to med school. Im applying right now. Will update when/if I get in. In the meantime work as an cs intern.
 
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Judgment Dragon

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Studying comp sci at a top 10 univ while applying to med school. Im applying right now. Will update when/if I get in. In the meantime work as an cs intern.
Which pharmacy school did you attended before you quit? Which specialty will your MD be in?
 

rederza

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Which pharmacy school did you attended before you quit? Which specialty will your MD be in?
Cannot disclose school because people have been reading too far into my posts and taking it way too personally. I attended a school in Texas. That's a bit far ahead thinking, for now I have listed EM, FM, and OBGYN as my interests.
 

rph3664

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1. They genuinely want to be a pharmacist

2. The money

3. Yes, DENIAL.
 

BidingMyTime

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What else are people going to study in college? EVERY career is saturated, many to a far greater extent than pharmacists. Kids these days have to do something.
 
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msweph

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This question has been asked a lot. From what I can gather:

-People like me who did zero research about the profession before entering it. Learned my lesson. I research everything THOROUGHLY now. Seriously, throughout college I never once googled outlook of pharmacy, or the advancement, or the way it's turning out. I credit my naivety and laziness with it. It was a painfully expensive lesson.
-People who want to be health professionals but don't have good enough grades to do anything else
-People who really think they'll be cosmetic/medicine developers
-People who think it's the next best thing to being a doctor
-People who want the easy money for minimal work. When you're in college studying mundane things, the appeal of making 100+k handing out pills all day is very enticing.
-Foreigners, because pharmacy has the laxest standards out of any of the health doctoral programs


I definitely heard of a lot of "I wanted to be ___ or ____ but my grades were only good enough for this" when I was still a p student.
The pharmacy school had a higher undergrad average GPA than the medical school did where I attended.
 

rederza

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The pharmacy school had a higher undergrad average GPA than the medical school did where I attended.
It's a bit skewed, at least in Texas there are many people in pharmacy schools that entered with just 2 years of CC. I'd imagine it to be the same as where you are from. Medical school requires a bachelor's which is harder to maintain a good gpa than getting a 4.0 at CC. They just all lump it as undergrad GPA though.
 

SexiestPharmacist

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It's a bit skewed, at least in Texas there are many people in pharmacy schools that entered with just 2 years of CC. I'd imagine it to be the same as where you are from. Medical school requires a bachelor's which is harder to maintain a good gpa than getting a 4.0 at CC. They just all lump it as undergrad GPA though.
exactly. I was amazed there were quite a few ppl who came directly from CC. it kinda lowers my self-esteem...like.. why did i go 4 years of state college. im from northeast btw
 

pillpharmer14

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It's a bit skewed, at least in Texas there are many people in pharmacy schools that entered with just 2 years of CC. I'd imagine it to be the same as where you are from. Medical school requires a bachelor's which is harder to maintain a good gpa than getting a 4.0 at CC. They just all lump it as undergrad GPA though.
I got some credits from CC simply as a financial decision but I didn't think you could get any upper level credits. Do CC really offer upper-level microbio and genetics?
 

pillpharmer14

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Interesting. I didn't even think it was possible to go straight from juco to pharmacy school
 

rederza

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msweph

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It's a bit skewed, at least in Texas there are many people in pharmacy schools that entered with just 2 years of CC. I'd imagine it to be the same as where you are from. Medical school requires a bachelor's which is harder to maintain a good gpa than getting a 4.0 at CC. They just all lump it as undergrad GPA though.
Nope. I was in undergrad class next to a couple of the resident physicians at my institution. No one in my program was from a cc .
 
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Nope. I was in undergrad class next to a couple of the resident physicians at my institution. No one in my program was from a cc .
Times have changed since the days you have attended school. It was actually a legitimate accomplishment. Apples and oranges when you compare current matriculation to your days.
 
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People still apply for law degrees right? Music? Art? Social Sciences?

I don't get why so many people think money and job stability is the only thing that matters

I don't care how much money computer science majors make and how stable their job environment is

I know its hard to believe for a lot of you who simply chose pharmacy because of money but many of us did not
 

pillpharmer14

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Yeah 4.0 at CC definitely not equivalent to 4.0 at a University, but honestly I don't blame people for doing that. Many CC are cheap enough that you can actually work enough to pay for it and not take out loans, and we all know how those stack up in pharmacy school.
 

CYP3A4

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Misinformed individuals that care only about money. However, those will be the ones who end up at ****ty diploma mill schools and then struggle to find a job later on.
 

MountainPharmD

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The same reasons people still apply to law school or spend $150,000 to get a degree in Liberal Arts so they can be a Starbucks barista.
 

BidingMyTime

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Medical school requires a bachelor's which is harder to maintain a good gpa than getting a 4.0 at CC. They just all lump it as undergrad GPA though.
Not true, at least technically. Not all medical schools require a bachelor's...even so, it would be extremely difficult to get admitted without a bachelor's, but it is technically possible (and happens on rare occasions.)
 

rederza

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Not true, at least technically. Not all medical schools require a bachelor's...even so, it would be extremely difficult to get admitted without a bachelor's, but it is technically possible (and happens on rare occasions.)
I'd assume extenuating life circumstances such as military service and a killer MCAT...this is not the norm as opposed to pharmacy where it is (at least in my school) to not have a bachelor's.
 

stoichiometrist

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I also see the sunk cost fallacy applied frequently. i.e. "I know pharmacy is saturated, I know I'm going to be in $200k+ debt and have a hard time finding a job, but I've already taken the prerequisites, I've already taken the PCAT, I've already spent all this time and money on applications so I'm not going back. After going through all this, what's another $200k+ in loans and 4 years of school going to do to me?"
 
Sep 7, 2015
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What else are people going to study in college? EVERY career is saturated, many to a far greater extent than pharmacists. Kids these days have to do something.
this is the absolute truth. I know people in many "prestigious" professions and its a dog fight.
 

OldPhotography

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I've worked in pharmacy for 3 years (grocery store) and I've been with the company for 7. I love what I do. I have always been successful academically and knew it was right for me. Here I am 2 months into pharmacy school and I know it's the right place for me to be. I pity the people that have never worked in pharmacy and aren't planning on it until after they graduate that are going into it because it's going to be quite hard for them to get a job afterwards.