ALMD2B

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Just wandering what are the requirements for pathologyfellowships. If you have an interest in a certain field, do they automatically let you in? Do you need to do well on in-service exams and such to get a decent fellowship? What can a pathology resident do to obtain certain fellowships?

Thanks in advance.

A.
 

PathOne

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Well, for starters, you'd have to be board certified or board eligible in anatomic and/or clinical pathology.
You DO NOT automatically get what you want, but competition varies greatly among both subspecs and institutions, from fairly easy to insanely competitive.
In addition, fellowship is increasingly seen as necessary for many positions, so applicant pool is likely to grow faster than # of fellowships.

Qualifications includes step scores, board scores, grades/schools, research etc. etc. Also, some programs want you to do two fellowships, e.g. surg path followed by pediatric path or whatever.

There's currently 10 subspecs which are certified by the American Board of Pathology:
Blood Banking/Transfusion Medicine
Chemical Pathology
Cytopathology
Dermatopathology
Forensic Pathology
Hematology
Medical Microbiology
Molecular Genetic Pathology
Neuropathology
Pediatric Pathology
 

stormjen

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I am interested in one of the more competitive fellowships, and I've been advised to go to a residency program that has the fellowship, and to publish in the field and present at national conferences. For the less competitive fellowships, simply applying well enough in advance might be enough. I don't know how much in-service and boards scores factor into the equation.
 

b&ierstiefel

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Thanks for the info PathOne. I'm surprised there aren't more subspecialties in which one can become board certified. Do you or anyone else know of new subspecialties that are likely to involve board certification in the next few years?
 

jeff2005

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Which fellowships are the most in demand in the private practive setting? Heme, cyto, and derm? I would like some flexibility when I finish. I actually love renal path, but the jobs are scarce.
 

pathdawg

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jeff2005 said:
Which fellowships are the most in demand in the private practive setting? Heme, cyto, and derm? I would like some flexibility when I finish. I actually love renal path, but the jobs are scarce.

All of the "big three" (cyto, heme, and derm) are good. I would rank the most in demand as: 1) derm; 2) heme; 3) cyto.
 

stormjen

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jeff2005 said:
Which fellowships are the most in demand in the private practive setting? Heme, cyto, and derm? I would like some flexibility when I finish. I actually love renal path, but the jobs are scarce.
From what I understand, GI is in good demand as well.
 

yaah

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stormjen said:
From what I understand, GI is in good demand as well.
When the program director here sends us "job opportunity" emails, which are general a place advertising for a new pathologist, usually private practice, it often includes "prefer subspecialty training" and the variably include cyto, derm, hemepath, GI, or GU. Sometimes they mention all five and say "any of the above."
 

stormjen

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GI is cool, but I prefer to avoid the poo. Celiac disease is kind of interesting but, again, poo.
 

yaah

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stormjen said:
GI is cool, but I prefer to avoid the poo. Celiac disease is kind of interesting but, again, poo.
Yeah but in the fellowship you don't deal with grossing specimens much. The only real poo you see is on the slide, and poo is less objectionable on a slide when it is fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained.
 

b&ierstiefel

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yaah said:
Yeah but in the fellowship you don't deal with grossing specimens much. The only real poo you see is on the slide, and poo is less objectionable on a slide when it is fixed, paraffin embedded, and stained.
poo stains funny on H&E, and it is so obvious when you see it!

i remember when i was sitting on signout as an M4...

Attending: "So what organ are we in?"
Andy: "Well, judging from the poo on the lumenal side, I must say this is the colon."
Attending: "Oh so you think you're smart huh? What's the diagnosis?"
Andy: "Poopants."
 

yaah

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AndyMilonakis said:
poo stains funny on H&E, and it is so obvious when you see it!

i remember when i was sitting on signout as an M4...

Attending: "So what organ are we in?"
Andy: "Well, judging from the poo on the lumenal side, I must say this is the colon."
Attending: "Oh so you think you're smart huh? What's the diagnosis?"
Andy: "Poopants."
If you were sitting with HA he probably would have started singing the diarrhea song for you at that point. Honest. He sings the diarrhea song. 80 million publications and a 40 year career and he sings about diarrhea.
 

PathOne

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GI is pretty anal, methinks... However, I increasingly find soft tissue and bone sexy. Soft tissue can be complicated stuff, and bone is just so darn rare. Might have to go back to school and head up to Boston to Chris Fletcher..... :)