What are the ways to go forward after BDS (Bachelor of Dental Sciences) in India

bidams243

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Hii Experts...

I will be completing BDS (Bachelor of Dental Sciences) in Dec 2008 in Indian university. Not yet decided what to do after BDS. Could any body suggest me what are all the ways to go forward…

Tanks in advance...

Rajesh...
 

Dr.Millisevert

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Hii Experts...

Not yet decided what to do after BDS. Could any body suggest me what are all the ways to go forward…

Tanks in advance...

Rajesh...
Depends on what you want to do...

Options:

1. Get a job
2. Apply for specialty training
3. Apply for research training

Also, have to decide where you want to work.

You might want to be a little more specific in your questions if you want a helpful answer. :thumbup:

Also, you might want to just try and do some general research on SDN and elsewhere online before you start asking questions. I'm sure the answers to your questions are already answered somewhere out there.. do some searches. Dentistry is a great career... Good luck.
 

SCDC

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BDS is Bachelor of Dental Surgery, not sciences.
 

Dr.Millisevert

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BDS is Bachelor of Dental Surgery, not sciences.
Different dental schools call their degrees different things. BDS, BDSc, BChD, CD, Dr.MedDent, DDS, DMD, DDM, BDent, BDentSc, etc.

For some dental schools the "S" or "Sc" does mean "science". However, regardless what you call it: (Dental Science, Dental Surgery, Dental Medicine).. they are all equal first professional degrees in dentistry. :thumbup:
 

NileBDS

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Different dental schools call their degrees different things. BDS, BDSc, BChD, CD, Dr.MedDent, DDS, DMD, DDM, BDent, BDentSc, etc.

For some dental schools the "S" or "Sc" does mean "science". However, regardless what you call it: (Dental Science, Dental Surgery, Dental Medicine).. they are all equal first professional degrees in dentistry. :thumbup:

As much as you would like to think so, I am afraid they are not (and please stop quoting Wikipedia for God's sake). I can probably go back and edit that same page to make it say exactly what I WANT IT to say.

The fact is this; we can debate this until we are blue in the face, but that will not change the reality that one degree is a bachelors another is a doctorate, and we're not just talking about names.

Many schools and different countries have emulated the US educational system in many ways (as they always do), and part of that is that some have decided to "slap" DMD or DDS on their graduation diplomas, thinking that this would all of a sudden give their graduates more credibility or "Americanize" their image so to speak. That however does not make a Bachelor of Stomatology equal to a Bachelor of Dental Surgery nor a Dental Medicine Doctorate. Let's get real ...

Dr.Millisevert, I've noticed that you always get all bent out of shape whenever this topic arises, and express some insecurities in this regard, but I just needed to step in and set the record straight.
Just be proud of your education and whatever they call the degree they grant you. Some of the best dentists in this very country and several global pioneers are BDS's.

If at the end of the day, it makes you sleep better to think that all degrees are equal, then so be it ...
 

NileBDS

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Different dental schools call their degrees different things. BDS, BDSc, BChD, CD, Dr.MedDent, DDS, DMD, DDM, BDent, BDentSc, etc.

...
That's true. The S in BDS could stand for either Surgery or Science. If you want to get technical:
BDS - Bachelor of Dental Surgery
BDSc - Bachelor of Dental Sciences
 

Dr.Millisevert

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The fact is this; we can debate this until we are blue in the face, but that will not change the reality that one degree is a bachelors another is a doctorate, and we're not just talking about names.

Many schools and different countries have emulated the US educational system in many ways (as they always do), and part of that is that some have decided to "slap" DMD or DDS on their graduation diplomas, thinking that this would all of a sudden give their graduates more credibility or "Americanize" their image so to speak. That however does not make a Bachelor of Stomatology equal to a Bachelor of Dental Surgery nor a Dental Medicine Doctorate. Let's get real ...
Well.. it depends on which country and which system you obtained the degree in. There are lots of dental schools (Japan, Taiwan, Korea, Philippines, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Germany, etc, etc) that have programs that accept students right out of high school for a 5-7 year dental program that culminates in a DDS degree "doctorate" as you say.

There are also some programs (University of Sydney) for example that grants a BDent "bachelor", however it is a 4 year dental degree program with a curriculum that is identical to American dental schools (their curriculum was developed with help from UBC and Harvard) that also requires all applicants to have completed a previous bachelors for admission and requires DAT or GAMSAT exam scores, etc etc.. Identical to a US DDS/DMD program. The University of Sydney is also applying to CODA to accredit their dental program over the next couple of years. So, especially if they are granted CODA accreditation... you're going to have a hard time convincing me that the Sydney BDent its any different just because they title the degree differently.

By the way... most all of the Vet programs in Australia and New Zealand are now accredited by the AVMA in the US and Canada. For example: The BVSc degree at the University of Sydney is an American and Canadian accredited Vet degree. Since they are now American accredited degrees they are 100% equivalent and equal to any US DVM or VMD degree program ....and are licensable as such. :thumbup:

Again, I don't want to get into an argument. But really... many dental schools grant degrees and call their degrees many different things that may or may not represent their admission scheme, curriculum, or academic standards.

So, regardless of what you call it.. every school is different.

Dr.Millisevert, I've noticed that you always get all bent out of shape whenever this topic arises, and express some insecurities in this regard, but I just needed to step in and set the record straight.
Just be proud of your education and whatever they call the degree they grant you. Some of the best dentists in this very country and several global pioneers are BDS's.

If at the end of the day, it makes you sleep better to think that all degrees are equal, then so be it ...
I am very proud of my education. :) I hope you're proud of yours! If you feel like the DDS you've earned in the US represents a much better dental education or a higher level degree than the BDS you earned in Egypt. Then so be it...

Peace
 

servitup

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We have some international dentists in our dental school class and most of them seem to think that our education is far superior to the one they had before.
 

g3k

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We have some international dentists in our dental school class and most of them seem to think that our education is far superior to the one they had before.
I don't think it is far superior. None of my classmates (FTD's) think that. Some of us think it is far different from what we got in our countries. It is geared to a different set of population, with different needs. We don't need a comprehensive treatement plan in some of our countries. The people in some of our countries just need their chief complaint attended to. They don't care for cosmetics, extreme make overs. They don't have people come in with coach bags asking for $1 prescriptions in our countries. They don't come asking for Brad Pitt's smile or Angelina Joile's teeth. They don't sue us for some mistakes we, as humans, make. These are the differences.
 

Dr.Millisevert

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We have some international dentists in our dental school class and most of them seem to think that our education is far superior to the one they had before.
Obviously it depends on where these dentists obtained their education and where they were working previously doesn't it? I would presume that most of the dentists enrolling in these programs are from 3rd world non-english speaking countries where the patient base is quite different to the US. Dental graduates from these countries could probably benefit from spending a couple of years acclimating to the US system.

Australia and New Zealand however are 1st world english speaking countries not really any different to Canada and the US. Dentists learn the same things here as they do there and earn very similar salaries.

"I don't foresee any significant movement of international dentists, except in Australia and New Zealand, who have programs much like those in the United States. CODA could conceivably develop reciprocal agreements in those countries."
- CODA Vice Chair James R. Cole II, DDS

Obviously the American accreditation committee seems to think Australian and New Zealand have dental programs of the same academic standard as Canada and the US. :thumbup:
 

g3k

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Obviously it depends on where these dentists obtained their education and where they were working previously doesn't it? I would presume that most of the dentists enrolling in these programs are from 3rd world non-english speaking countries where the patient base is quite different to the US. Dental graduates from these countries could probably benefit from spending a couple of years acclimating to the US system.

Australia and New Zealand however are 1st world english speaking countries not really any different to Canada and the US. Dentists learn the same things here as they do there and earn very similar salaries.

"I don’t foresee any significant movement of international dentists, except in Australia and New Zealand, who have programs much like those in the United States. CODA could conceivably develop reciprocal agreements in those countries.”
- CODA Vice Chair James R. Cole II, DDS


Obviously the American accreditation committee seems to think Australian and New Zealand have dental programs of the same academic standard as Canada and the US. :thumbup:
But they haven't, have they? :)
 

Dr.Millisevert

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But they haven't, have they? :)
Actually they are!

These things take a long time to complete (lots of paperwork and site visits are required). This quote was taken from a document that was published 2 years ago. They are currently in the process of developing this now.

Sydney's Vet program just obtained North American accreditation in 2005. That accreditation process took over 5-7 years to complete.

In regards to dentistry... the University of Sydney's dental program for example is currently undergoing an independant curriculum review this year and will be scheduling their first CODA site visit hopefully in late 2009 or early 2010. :thumbup:
 

BlueToothHunter

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Hii Experts...

I will be completing BDS (Bachelor of Dental Sciences) in Dec 2008 in Indian university. Not yet decided what to do after BDS. Could any body suggest me what are all the ways to go forward…

Tanks in advance...

Rajesh...

Did you become a dentist in the first place because you wanted to, or someone suggested you to be one?

I'm only asking this question because you are asking the internet what to do with your dental degree...

Raj, I would suggest that you go and find youself a good associate dentist position and make lots of money! You deserve it man!:thumbup:
 

Dr.Millisevert

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Did you become a dentist in the first place because you wanted to, or someone suggested you to be one?

I'm only asking this question because you are asking the internet what to do with your dental degree...

Raj, I would suggest that you go and find youself a good associate dentist position and make lots of money! You deserve it man!:thumbup:
I agree with bluetoothhunter.. you have family in your area of india? Why not find a good mentor dentist locally who would like to hire someone and get some experience. :thumbup: Good luck!
 

g3k

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Actually they are!

These things take a long time to complete (lots of paperwork and site visits are required). This quote was taken from a document that was published 2 years ago. They are currently in the process of developing this now.

Sydney's Vet program just obtained North American accreditation in 2005. That accreditation process took over 5-7 years to complete.

In regards to dentistry... the University of Sydney's dental program for example is currently undergoing an independant curriculum review this year and will be scheduling their first CODA site visit hopefully in late 2009 or early 2010. :thumbup:
Good for the vet schools, but 'technically', the australian dental schools haven't yet been accredited. Good luck to the schools though. :)
 

g3k

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Hii Experts...

I will be completing BDS (Bachelor of Dental Sciences) in Dec 2008 in Indian university. Not yet decided what to do after BDS. Could any body suggest me what are all the ways to go forward…

Tanks in advance...

Rajesh...
The 'earning lots of money with an associateship' is one option. The others are setting up your own clinic, specializing, teaching, research and many more.
 

servitup

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I don't think it is far superior. None of my classmates (FTD's) think that. Some of us think it is far different from what we got in our countries. It is geared to a different set of population, with different needs. We don't need a comprehensive treatement plan in some of our countries. The people in some of our countries just need their chief complaint attended to. They don't care for cosmetics, extreme make overs. They don't have people come in with coach bags asking for $1 prescriptions in our countries. They don't come asking for Brad Pitt's smile or Angelina Joile's teeth. They don't sue us for some mistakes we, as humans, make. These are the differences.
Your post makes it sound like the difference is that patients here expect modern, top-quality care. I think you are making my point. Also, the folks in question from my school were trained in third world countries, not Europe or Australia.
 

g3k

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Your post makes it sound like the difference is that patients here expect modern, top-quality care. I think you are making my point. Also, the folks in question from my school were trained in third world countries, not Europe or Australia.
Modern does not equal top quality. I can make a full gold crown top quality which is probably better than a PFM or cerec that people here go for. Patients here think amalgam is harmful, patients in India don't. So - no, I am not making your point. :)

P.S. - I do give credit to most of the professors' attitudes here. They are friendlier than some of what I had experienced. But again there are some who are such a pain here too.
 

BlueToothHunter

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The Original Poster doesn't even know what to do with his/her dental degree... do you think he'll be keen enough to start his/her own dental office?? Or let alone to go into teaching or specializing? This person probably got into dental school because of peer/family pressure. If this was the case, then it's probably a good guess to rule out "setting up own clinic, specializing, teaching, research and many more". You can only take the donkey to the water but you can't drink for the donkey! (I heard that from a good South Indian friend...) OP should just try his/her hands in dentistry and see if there is any future in this career. Otherwise get out now!

The 'earning lots of money with an associateship' is one option. The others are setting up your own clinic, specializing, teaching, research and many more.
 

g3k

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The Original Poster doesn't even know what to do with his/her dental degree... do you think he'll be keen enough to start his/her own dental office?? Or let alone to go into teaching or specializing? This person probably got into dental school because of peer/family pressure. If this was the case, then it's probably a good guess to rule out "setting up own clinic, specializing, teaching, research and many more". You can only take the donkey to the water but you can't drink for the donkey! (I heard that from a good South Indian friend...) OP should just try his/her hands in dentistry and see if there is any future in this career. Otherwise get out now!
Yeah, you are probably right.