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notageek

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Hi everyone,
From my MCAT experience, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out what books/courses were good, which tests I should take as diagnostic and what the official tests were, etc. I think with the USMLE, I'd like to be more familiar with what is out there earlier on, so I won't be spending too much money and time on the technical stuff. Anywa advice on what time of tests are out there and what books are decent?
I will be an MSI this coming fall. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Also, stupid Q but it NBME = USMLE?
:D
 

MilkmanAl

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For your first year, forget Step 1 exists. Books that will be useful for class and later:

Rapid Review biochem (apparently - I never used it)
BRS phys
BRS gross
HY neuro
HY molecular bio
 

vicinihil

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I think getting an old copy of FA to look at while going through classes is helpful to get the big picture. Remember that you'll want to buy the latest version that year when you take the test (2012 for you I guess).
 

kryptik

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I think getting an old copy of FA to look at while going through classes is helpful to get the big picture. Remember that you'll want to buy the latest version that year when you take the test (2012 for you I guess).
i concur, and halfway through MS1 you can get a years subscription of usmlerx. If your school is system based you should get rapid review path as well.
 

illixir

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I don't think you need to know anything about the USMLE as you enter first year. Maybe after 6 months look over board review materials for the stuff you've learned(mainly only relevant if you're systems based, otherwise do that after first year). I would focus on learning the material well, I know I personally would be very setback in my board studying if I used board review materials to study in first year.

Think about it, did you start buying mcat prep books and looking over mcat material on the first day of bio, orgo?
 

Eta Carinae

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Hi everyone,
From my MCAT experience, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out what books/courses were good, which tests I should take as diagnostic and what the official tests were, etc. I think with the USMLE, I'd like to be more familiar with what is out there earlier on, so I won't be spending too much money and time on the technical stuff. Anywa advice on what time of tests are out there and what books are decent?
I will be an MSI this coming fall. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Also, stupid Q but it NBME = USMLE?
:D
1. The USMLE = the exam itself. The NBME is the body that administers the exam and regulates licensing eligibility, passing standards etc.

2. For med school, this may sound painful, but there are no shortcuts.

Consistently the highest step I scorers in my school were not people who were "good test takers"- as applies to the SAT, MCAT- but the ones who had the most solid grasp of the material.

Solid grasp of the material was achieved by (from my experience and observations):
a. Using textbooks, not Review material, as your primary reference/study sources especially first year
b. Making high yield notes of your own
c. Maintaining an arsenal of your own personal notes and reviewing them often
d. Dispensing with the notion that once a class or module or semester is over, you can discard the notes or information. All information builds from the foundation of your MS1. You know the old college habit- "I won't need this again..."
e. dedicated, consistent study every single day. For me, this was 7-8 hours/day everyday after class except one day a week (when I did 4).

3. There are IMO six major branches of basic sciences you need to master and books you should live, eat and sleep with:
a. PHYSIOLOGY: Guyton Textbook of Medical Physiology

b. PHARMACOLOGY: Goodman & Gilman Pharm

c. PATHOLOGY: Robbins & Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease

d. MICROBIOLOGY: Made Ridiculously Simple (I'll give you an easy cop out on this one) It is sufficient for the medical knowledge requirement for med school.

e. ANATOMY: Both Netter's Atlas and Moore's for clinical correlation and narratives

f. NEUROANATOMY: Both BRS and High Yield are sufficient for this.
You don't have to buy any of these but use them liberally in your school's library. I would recommend owning a Robbins, Netter's from the get go.

Second year, you can graduate to Review series such as High Yield.

Master these branches and you'll be solid physician any day.

If you do the work first year, you will kiss yourself come time to study for Step I and your scores will reflect that.

Without a solid MS1 foundation, unlike college, there is no catching up later.

I hope this helps.
 

PhilIvey

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1. The USMLE = the exam itself. The NBME is the body that administers the exam and regulates licensing eligibility, passing standards etc.

2. For med school, this may sound painful, but there are no shortcuts.

Consistently the highest step I scorers in my school were not people who were "good test takers"- as applies to the SAT, MCAT- but the ones who had the most solid grasp of the material.

Solid grasp of the material was achieved by (from my experience and observations):
a. Using textbooks, not Review material, as your primary reference/study sources especially first year
b. Making high yield notes of your own
c. Maintaining an arsenal of your own personal notes and reviewing them often
d. Dispensing with the notion that once a class or module or semester is over, you can discard the notes or information. All information builds from the foundation of your MS1. You know the old college habit- "I won't need this again..."
e. dedicated, consistent study every single day. For me, this was 7-8 hours/day everyday after class except one day a week (when I did 4).

3. There are IMO six major branches of basic sciences you need to master and books you should live, eat and sleep with:
a. PHYSIOLOGY: Guyton Textbook of Medical Physiology

b. PHARMACOLOGY: Goodman & Gilman Pharm

c. PATHOLOGY: Robbins & Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease

d. MICROBIOLOGY: Made Ridiculously Simple (I'll give you an easy cop out on this one) It is sufficient for the medical knowledge requirement for med school.

e. ANATOMY: Both Netter's Atlas and Moore's for clinical correlation and narratives

f. NEUROANATOMY: Both BRS and High Yield are sufficient for this.
You don't have to buy any of these but use them liberally in your school's library. I would recommend owning a Robbins, Netter's from the get go.

Second year, you can graduate to Review series such as High Yield.

Master these branches and you'll be solid physician any day.

If you do the work first year, you will kiss yourself come time to study for Step I and your scores will reflect that.

Without a solid MS1 foundation, unlike college, there is no catching up later.

I hope this helps.
Excellent post. I will save this.
 

SAvoodoo

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Hi everyone,
From my MCAT experience, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out what books/courses were good, which tests I should take as diagnostic and what the official tests were, etc. I think with the USMLE, I'd like to be more familiar with what is out there earlier on, so I won't be spending too much money and time on the technical stuff. Anywa advice on what time of tests are out there and what books are decent?
I will be an MSI this coming fall. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Also, stupid Q but it NBME = USMLE?
:D
from what i gather on this site you're 1 summer behind...family practice it is!
 

username456789

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1. The USMLE = the exam itself. The NBME is the body that administers the exam and regulates licensing eligibility, passing standards etc.

2. For med school, this may sound painful, but there are no shortcuts.

Consistently the highest step I scorers in my school were not people who were "good test takers"- as applies to the SAT, MCAT- but the ones who had the most solid grasp of the material.

Solid grasp of the material was achieved by (from my experience and observations):
a. Using textbooks, not Review material, as your primary reference/study sources especially first year
b. Making high yield notes of your own
c. Maintaining an arsenal of your own personal notes and reviewing them often
d. Dispensing with the notion that once a class or module or semester is over, you can discard the notes or information. All information builds from the foundation of your MS1. You know the old college habit- "I won't need this again..."
e. dedicated, consistent study every single day. For me, this was 7-8 hours/day everyday after class except one day a week (when I did 4).

3. There are IMO six major branches of basic sciences you need to master and books you should live, eat and sleep with:
a. PHYSIOLOGY: Guyton Textbook of Medical Physiology

b. PHARMACOLOGY: Goodman & Gilman Pharm

c. PATHOLOGY: Robbins & Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease

d. MICROBIOLOGY: Made Ridiculously Simple (I'll give you an easy cop out on this one) It is sufficient for the medical knowledge requirement for med school.

e. ANATOMY: Both Netter's Atlas and Moore's for clinical correlation and narratives

f. NEUROANATOMY: Both BRS and High Yield are sufficient for this.
You don't have to buy any of these but use them liberally in your school's library. I would recommend owning a Robbins, Netter's from the get go.

Second year, you can graduate to Review series such as High Yield.

Master these branches and you'll be solid physician any day.

If you do the work first year, you will kiss yourself come time to study for Step I and your scores will reflect that.

Without a solid MS1 foundation, unlike college, there is no catching up later.

I hope this helps.

I would've had almost zero use for any pathology or pharmacology texts in M1.
 

MilkmanAl

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I had almost zero use for them in M2. Really, the only items on that list I would recommend are Netter's (though I personally preferred Rohen's) and CMMRS. Everything else is either extraneous or not the best source, in my opinion.
 

Phur

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Don't get too far ahead of yourself. First year is all about studying hard the subjects you have. Don't try to cut corners. Get as much as you can this first time. The less time you have to spend refreshing/relearning/teaching yourself for the first time later on when it is time to board study the better. Once you get into 2nd year, then you can start worrying about review books and keeping stuff fresh.
 

Eta Carinae

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I had almost zero use for them in M2. Really, the only items on that list I would recommend are Netter's (though I personally preferred Rohen's) and CMMRS. Everything else is either extraneous or not the best source, in my opinion.
:laugh:

Are you still in AR?

Cuz I've been reviewing the most competitive school lists are have yet to find one that's located in AR. Perhaps you are allowed to slack off in AR but where I went, the difference between the #1 and the #5 student was tenths of a percentage. Every point of diligence was required.

Oh and you got kicked out for failing to make a 60% the third time. A 60% at my school easily translates to a 110% straight AOA at yours.

Physicians and med students- vast variation in quality.
 

Eta Carinae

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Don't get too far ahead of yourself. First year is all about studying hard the subjects you have. Don't try to cut corners. Get as much as you can this first time. The less time you have to spend refreshing/relearning/teaching yourself for the first time later on when it is time to board study the better. Once you get into 2nd year, then you can start worrying about review books and keeping stuff fresh.
:thumbup:
 

username456789

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:laugh:

Are you still in AR?

Cuz I've been reviewing the most competitive school lists are have yet to find one that's located in AR. Perhaps you are allowed to slack off in AR but where I went, the difference between the #1 and the #5 student was tenths of a percentage. Every point of diligence was required.

Oh and you got kicked out for failing to make a 60% the third time. A 60% at my school easily translates to a 110% straight AOA at yours.

Physicians and med students- vast variation in quality.

I can't decide if you're a troll or just the biggest douche on this site since the Hopkins fellow who made an mdapps 10 years after the fact, and then came on here denigrating med students.

Grow up.
 

Eta Carinae

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Oh please.

I've said my piece here. This is advice that anyone can take or leave re: studying as an MS1.

And everything I said about varying qualities of med students is the TRUTH, doesn't have to be pleasant, but it is TRUE.

I've got better things to do than to continue to engage you.
 

username456789

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Oh please.

I've said my piece here. This is advice that anyone can take or leave re: studying as an MS1.

And everything I said about varying qualities of med students is the TRUTH, doesn't have to be pleasant, but it is TRUE.

I've got better things to do than to continue to engage you.

By CAPITALIZING things, you don't automatically turn shit into TRUTH. Dweebs like you are usually sifted out during the med school application process, but I've seen a bunch make it through. So, congrats.

I wasn't referring to your "advice." I was referring to your completely asinine, juvenile, and unnecessary attack on MilkmanAl.

I don't care where you are in the galaxy of medical training, you're still a 14 year old trapped in the body of (presumably) an adult.
 

tncekm

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:laugh:

Are you still in AR?

Cuz I've been reviewing the most competitive school lists are have yet to find one that's located in AR. Perhaps you are allowed to slack off in AR but where I went, the difference between the #1 and the #5 student was tenths of a percentage. Every point of diligence was required.

Oh and you got kicked out for failing to make a 60% the third time. A 60% at my school easily translates to a 110% straight AOA at yours.

Physicians and med students- vast variation in quality.
LOL. What did Milkman do to deserve this?!
 
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username456789

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Ok now that that's over, who wants to compare dick size?
 
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username456789

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nothing more to add.
Clearly, which is why you've resorted to ad hominem attacks and grammar policing.

I should add, however, that I'm usually a stickler for grammar and the inappropriate apostrophe is my arch-enemy. Which is why it's that much more heinous that I made such an egregious error.
 

Eta Carinae

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For subjects like Genetics and Psych (which we had first and second year), I found class notes to be sufficient so I cannot really make recommendations for preclinical texts for those.
 

username456789

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Eta will continue to follow each one of my posts diligently with a bland, generic endorsement one by one rather than compiling her thoughts into one post so that she can showcase how she refuses to acknowledge me.
 
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Eta Carinae

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Also, if you can, study groups are more efficient than studying alone- if you can get a solid one going, do so.

And unlike college, where you're not confident of the level of commitment of every single classmate, in med school, you're among equals- in motivation, neuroticism :)laugh:), intellectual acumen, diligence and stamina.
 

username456789

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Eta Carinae

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by second year, I would start adding notes/addenda to your USMLE first Aid from your class/textbook notes. It saves you a lot of time during your dedicated preparation time for I.
 

username456789

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Eta will continue to follow each one of my posts diligently with a bland, generic endorsement one by one rather than compiling her thoughts into one post so that she can showcase how she refuses to acknowledge me.

....

Seriously, Eta, if your intent is to provide useful information, then by all means go ahead, but you're clogging up the internet tubes with your piecemeal advice. Waiting for me to post before throwing out another jewel is a little awkward.
 

Eta Carinae

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Hi everyone,
From my MCAT experience, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out what books/courses were good, which tests I should take as diagnostic and what the official tests were, etc. I think with the USMLE, I'd like to be more familiar with what is out there earlier on, so I won't be spending too much money and time on the technical stuff. Anywa advice on what time of tests are out there and what books are decent?
I will be an MSI this coming fall. Any advice is greatly appreciated.
Also, stupid Q but it NBME = USMLE?
:D
All this while I forgot to say, Congratulations.

You may not have the time, once med school commences and if you are intent on being in the top 5% of your class (as I was), to while away on an online forum.

I only really became as heavily involved in this forum as I am currently AFTER med school was done.

Finally, learn to prioritize.
 

username456789

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Since we're now regressing to passive-aggressive jabs, I'd like to take this commercial break to mention that I'm currently ranked #2 in my class, and still have time to piddle away on this forum.
 
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I had almost zero use for them in M2. Really, the only items on that list I would recommend are Netter's (though I personally preferred Rohen's) and CMMRS. Everything else is either extraneous or not the best source, in my opinion.
There's nothing offensive in this post :laugh:... He/she was just stating his opinion, like the rest of us. Everyone uses different methods to study best in med school, that's nothing new.

I agree with the above posters that say developing a solid foundation is neccessary. Ideally, it will be through reading the corresponding textbooks. But in some curriculums, you just dont have time... and all the test qns come off the syllabus... So my two cents are to KNOW what you study and develop ways to retain it. No need to go crazy with First Aid from the start, IMO.
 
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