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What do people mean when they say that PS is more conceptual on latter FL's & real thing?

Discussion in 'MCAT Discussions' started by PREMED501, 05.21.14.

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  1. PREMED501

    PREMED501 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    12.01.11
    Messages:
    259
    When people say that PS is more conceptual do they mean that there are more passages like the earthquake physics passage from one of the AAMC practice tests (I forget which # but I think it was 5 or 7)? Also, how does the difficulty of bio in AAMC 8 compare to 9-11 and real thing? I thought it was the most manageable of all tests 3-8.
     
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  3. derrick rose

    derrick rose 2+ Year Member

    Joined:
    02.22.13
    Messages:
    116
    I don't think it really matters how the later AAMCs are oriented about. The MCAT is changing all the time. The writers want to mix it up as much as possible, but at the same time, be as fair as possible to everyone writing it. This means that they probably don't have special "themes" on their mind for the MCAT exams. If there is an exam heavily weighted on conceptual physics...or organic chemistry...or biochemistry...it was probably just a coincidence!

    Anyways, to answer one of your questions. I think by what is meant with "conceptual physics" is the understanding of the systems at work and such. This can be good or bad, depending on your physics background. Its meant to test you less on the basis of facts and formulas that a lot of people tend to abstract from flashcards or textbooks. A good example of a conceptual problem would be knowing that as angular momentum of an object increases, there must be a torque (external force) acting on the object to increase the momentum (through impulse)...kinetic energy increases...blah blah..it can all be inter connected systems. In contrast, a non-conceptual question would just want you plugging in the numbers.
     

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