What do you like about medicine? Why does this career sound great?

BennieBlanco

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I figured we should start a thread that instead of bashing and thinking about all the negative aspects of medicine, we could list all the things we love. I will start with a few short things:

Medicine:

1. Takes full dedication: I like a career that involves 100% investment and is challenging. Like a great tennis match, it is great when you have a difficult challenge to overcome and you win. (see 2008 Wimbledon final, Federer vs Nadal. Wow).

2. The human body is awesome: Genetics and biology are really amazing if you let them be. It's amazing how DNA goes to RNA which turns into proteins and makes this whole machine work. And how HIV can get into that genome and screw everything up. Wow, cool. And how the heck do you get those HIV genes out of the cell!? fascinating stuff.

Of course there is much more, but just a few to start!

Share your ideas.
 

Pinkertinkle

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you get to do some rather unique things like performing surgeries
 

maceo

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I figured we should start a thread that instead of bashing and thinking about all the negative aspects of medicine, we could list all the things we love. I will start with a few short things:

Medicine:

1. Takes full dedication: I like a career that involves 100% investment and is challenging. Like a great tennis match, it is great when you have a difficult challenge to overcome and you win. (see 2008 Wimbledon final, Federer vs Nadal. Wow).

2. The human body is awesome: Genetics and biology are really amazing if you let them be. It's amazing how DNA goes to RNA which turns into proteins and makes this whole machine work. And how HIV can get into that genome and screw everything up. Wow, cool. And how the heck do you get those HIV genes out of the cell!? fascinating stuff.

Of course there is much more, but just a few to start!

Share your ideas.

what used to be great about medicine was the autonomy you had. that is gone.. there is no more autonomy you are basicaly working for theman
 

Pinkertinkle

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what used to be great about medicine was the autonomy you had. that is gone.. there is no more autonomy you are basicaly working for theman
thnx for killing the OP's positive thread
 

argonaute

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I figured we should start a thread that instead of bashing and thinking about all the negative aspects of medicine, we could list all the things we love. I will start with a few short things:

Medicine:

1. Takes full dedication: I like a career that involves 100% investment and is challenging. Like a great tennis match, it is great when you have a difficult challenge to overcome and you win. (see 2008 Wimbledon final, Federer vs Nadal. Wow).

2. The human body is awesome: Genetics and biology are really amazing if you let them be. It's amazing how DNA goes to RNA which turns into proteins and makes this whole machine work. And how HIV can get into that genome and screw everything up. Wow, cool. And how the heck do you get those HIV genes out of the cell!? fascinating stuff.

Of course there is much more, but just a few to start!

Share your ideas.

I agree that the human body is absolutely miraculous, beautiful, and intriguing, and I would gladly dedicate everything to help unravel the mysteries of human life. Trying to build the story from chemistry to whole-systems analysis just reveals how miraculous life is. And through medicine, you take one of the most rigorous studies of this.

At the same time though, you can apply what you learn and understand to really go out there and help people, to make a personal difference in a few people's lives. You have your most challenging of times being rewarded with an (ideally) incredibly fulfilling experience.


and btw, the HIV genes don't get out of the cell. In fact, almost half (forgot exact percentage, i htink it's like 40-50%) of your DNA are retrotransposons: DNA from HIV other viruses related to HIV that just stay there. Compare this to the 3% of DNA that make up your coding genes...

Fortunately, these retrotransposons are silenced through various epigenetic mechanisms. If you find HIV fascinating, you should really look into the emerging research on epigenetics- chromatin modifications, RNA-induced silencing and transcriptional modifications, etc. Really paints a new picture on molecular genetics

i'm assuming you are just starting college- get ready for your most amazing experience of your life so far...
 

maceo

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I agree that the human body is absolutely miraculous, beautiful, and intriguing, and I would gladly dedicate everything to help unravel the mysteries of human life. Trying to build the story from chemistry to whole-systems analysis just reveals how miraculous life is. And through medicine, you take one of the most rigorous studies of this.
.
just to let you know.. I puked after i read your post
 

Trexate

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The awesome stories you end up with.

One time in the ER, this guy came in with some major diarrhea. Of course, he wasn't quite right in the head either, so when he went to the bathroom he used the no-flow urinal. I'm not exactly sure how he did it, but there was liquid poo all over the back of the urinal and it filled the basin to the brim. It also looked like he didn't get it all in the basin, because on his way back to the waiting room he had a nice mess on the back of his pants.

One word: Epic
 

red10

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The awesome stories you end up with.

One time in the ER, this guy came in with some major diarrhea. Of course, he wasn't quite right in the head either, so when he went to the bathroom he used the no-flow urinal. I'm not exactly sure how he did it, but there was liquid poo all over the back of the urinal and it filled the basin to the brim. It also looked like he didn't get it all in the basin, because on his way back to the waiting room he had a nice mess on the back of his pants.

One word: Epic
How about the geniuses that come it with the oddest things shoved in places they don't belong. The GI docs I worked with told stories about remote controls and squash balls put in places they don't belong and the patient not being able to get them back out.
 

Kaustikos

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The awesome stories you end up with.

One time in the ER, this guy came in with some major diarrhea. Of course, he wasn't quite right in the head either, so when he went to the bathroom he used the no-flow urinal. I'm not exactly sure how he did it, but there was liquid poo all over the back of the urinal and it filled the basin to the brim. It also looked like he didn't get it all in the basin, because on his way back to the waiting room he had a nice mess on the back of his pants.

One word: Epic
See, thats why we have volunteers.
 
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This might sound cheesy..but bear with me.

I like to help people ...yes, seriously, I do...

agreeing with the OP, human body is fasinating!!!!

=)
 

Trexate

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I like to help people ...yes, seriously, I do...
I think that in order to actually like medicine as a career, this is a must.

See, thats why we have volunteers.
Some of the most rewarding experiences I've had were working with kids with cancer. Some of the craziest **** I've ever seen happened in the ER.

Guy came in, drunk/high, and started a fist fight with the other patrons waiting in line. I got to see our officer take him down. Another time a guy came in with a pool noodle up his...well you get the idea.
 

maceo

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just to let you know...I puked ON your post. :p

well just to let you know ive read all your previous post and puked all over them. they are meritless.
 

maceo

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The awesome stories you end up with.

One time in the ER, this guy came in with some major diarrhea. Of course, he wasn't quite right in the head either, so when he went to the bathroom he used the no-flow urinal. I'm not exactly sure how he did it, but there was liquid poo all over the back of the urinal and it filled the basin to the brim. It also looked like he didn't get it all in the basin, because on his way back to the waiting room he had a nice mess on the back of his pants.

One word: Epic
oh great story. I gues you had to be there to appreciate how awesome it was to be there'
 

Trexate

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oh great story. I gues you had to be there to appreciate how awesome it was to be there'
Okay, maceo, you're being a Negative Nancy. Stop it. Eh, unless you want everyone to call you Negative Nancy from now on.
 
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BennieBlanco

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Another great thing is constantly learning.

There are always new things to learn and the field will continue to advance year after year. There are exciting new advances possible also with untreatable diseases.
 
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BennieBlanco

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Most people have a job that helps people in some way. Even prostitutes. And I'm sure they like it, too.
also it is a good career because you get to help people in a way that is mentally challenging and rewarding. Yes we could help people sweeping streets but if we have a penchant for biology and science, then we will be more fulfilled using our skills more fully.

Look at Michael Jordan who loved to compete.
Yes, Michael Jordan could have competed in checkers but his talents and skills were best used on a basketball court.
 
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BennieBlanco

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This might sound cheesy..but bear with me.

I like to help people ...yes, seriously, I do...

agreeing with the OP, human body is fasinating!!!!

=)
Great post ChinaDoll. Ignore the spoiled "wise" "experienced" people.
 
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Guys, money, power, guys.

...okay, and the occasional chick. ;)
To SB100: then I guess prostitutes would make great doctors then...they will never get sued

To BennieBlanco: Great point and thanks for supporting..



Bumpity Bump Bump...Guys Money Power Guys...
 

Kaustikos

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To SB100: then I guess prostitutes would make great doctors then...they will never get sued
...
They'd make great psychiatrists for men.

"No, you're not small! Not even close!"
"Oh, you are GREAT in bed!"
"You're so funny! You're such a great guy!"

And no need to Rx meds.:thumbup:

And great physical therapy
 
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Look at Michael Jordan who loved to compete.
Yes, Michael Jordan could have competed in checkers but his talents and skills were best used on a basketball court.
hahaha. so true.

four things for me: 1) everyday, meaningful contact with people, 2) continuous learning, 3) great opportunities for comm. service, 4) lots and lots of variety!!!
 

Parts Unknown

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I do greatly enjoy this profession. Perhaps I stand in direct opposition to some other posters (like Nilf, maceo, etc.), but that's my take on things.

For one, I did take a stab at another career before going to medical school, so the notion that the grass is greener does not sit with me. My foray into life as a biomedical researcher exposed me to a lot of ugly realities: instability, cutthroat competition, etc. The relatively defined path of medicine has been a picnic by comparison. Predictability is worth a lot.

For two, I was lucky and smart enough to settle into a specialty with favorable hours (usually 11 or 12 a day, but only M-F with some weekend call) that I totally dig. I definitely have a life outside of work, and that is also worth a lot.

For three, I am fortunate enough to find my work fascinating. It's mainly diagnostics that pertain to one organ system, and I love coming in to read the slide on a new patient. The treatment apparatus hinges upon my word, an it's both humbling and gratifying to know that my skills have such importance.

In summary, it is very possible to have a happy life as a physician, but you have to know yourself, your priorities, and you have to make smart decisions that accommodate your goals and personality. Yes, that's pretty fluffy advice, but it's what I got.
 

Richzz89

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I do greatly enjoy this profession. Perhaps I stand in direct opposition to some other posters (like Nilf, maceo, etc.), but that's my take on things.

For one, I did take a stab at another career before going to medical school, so the notion that the grass is greener does not sit with me. My foray into life as a biomedical researcher exposed me to a lot of ugly realities: instability, cutthroat competition, etc. The relatively defined path of medicine has been a picnic by comparison. Predictability is worth a lot.

For two, I was lucky and smart enough to settle into a specialty with favorable hours (usually 11 or 12 a day, but only M-F with some weekend call) that I totally dig. I definitely have a life outside of work, and that is also worth a lot.

For three, I am fortunate enough to find my work fascinating. It's mainly diagnostics that pertain to one organ system, and I love coming in to read the slide on a new patient. The treatment apparatus hinges upon my word, an it's both humbling and gratifying to that my skills have such importance.

In summary, it is very possible to have a happy life as a physician, but you have to know yourself, your priorities, and you have to make smart decisions that accommodate your goals and personality. Yes, that's pretty fluffy advice, but it's what I got.

Parts Unknown what did you do your residency on?
 

Parts Unknown

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11-12 hours a day is favorable, wtf? I thought 40 hours a week was favorable...
For a fellow those hours are not too bad. There is a lot to do and learn, and diseases don't follow a clock. When I'm an attending I will probably have it Mon-Fri 8-5 with alternating nights/weekends of home call coverage.

Compare this to any surgery resident's schedule and it will indeed look favorable.
 

JSJ1313

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Personally, I like many aspects, including the challenge, intimate human contact, and the dedication required to succeed. I was never someone that felt a pressing need to "help people," but over the last year my desire to do so has truly grown through volunteering, clinical shadowing, and participating in the UVA SMDEP. In addition, I love the atmosphere of healthcare and the people who work in the field.
 
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BennieBlanco

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I do greatly enjoy this profession. Perhaps I stand in direct opposition to some other posters (like Nilf, maceo, etc.), but that's my take on things.

For one, I did take a stab at another career before going to medical school, so the notion that the grass is greener does not sit with me. My foray into life as a biomedical researcher exposed me to a lot of ugly realities: instability, cutthroat competition, etc. The relatively defined path of medicine has been a picnic by comparison. Predictability is worth a lot.

For two, I was lucky and smart enough to settle into a specialty with favorable hours (usually 11 or 12 a day, but only M-F with some weekend call) that I totally dig. I definitely have a life outside of work, and that is also worth a lot.

For three, I am fortunate enough to find my work fascinating. It's mainly diagnostics that pertain to one organ system, and I love coming in to read the slide on a new patient. The treatment apparatus hinges upon my word, an it's both humbling and gratifying to know that my skills have such importance.

In summary, it is very possible to have a happy life as a physician, but you have to know yourself, your priorities, and you have to make smart decisions that accommodate your goals and personality. Yes, that's pretty fluffy advice, but it's what I got.
Wow, great answer!

It is good to hear from someone who has been down the road and is enjoying it. Cheers and I'm glad you enjoy it.

That wasn't fluffy advice at all, it is better advice than most give on these forums.
 
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BennieBlanco

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Personally, I like many aspects, including the challenge, intimate human contact, and the dedication required to succeed. I was never someone that felt a pressing need to "help people," but over the last year my desire to do so has truly grown through volunteering, clinical shadowing, and participating in the UVA SMDEP. In addition, I love the atmosphere of healthcare and the people who work in the field.
Agreed, the challenge is an exciting thing not a nuisance. And as lame as helping people sounds, it is true. It is better to go and help people than being in a career than doesn't allow it as much.

Atmosphere is cool too, agreed.
 

maceo

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Wow, great answer!

It is good to hear from someone who has been down the road and is enjoying it. Cheers and I'm glad you enjoy it.

That wasn't fluffy advice at all, it is better advice than most give on these forums.

he is a friggin pathologist... of course he is gonna not mind it. He is not dealing witih patients at all.. nil. he has NO pateint contact.. That must say something to you guys. the guy who says he loves it has NO pateint contact. well he has contact but theyre dead. He can take his sweet time to do the autopsy
 

RogueUnicorn

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he is a friggin pathologist... of course he is gonna not mind it. He is not dealing witih patients at all.. nil. he has NO pateint contact.. That must say something to you guys. the guy who says he loves it has NO pateint contact. well he has contact but theyre dead. He can take his sweet time to do the autopsy
i appreciate your point of view (seriously, i do.) but why don't you man up and do something else if you hate it that much.
 

red10

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he is a friggin pathologist... of course he is gonna not mind it. He is not dealing witih patients at all.. nil. he has NO pateint contact.. That must say something to you guys. the guy who says he loves it has NO pateint contact. well he has contact but theyre dead. He can take his sweet time to do the autopsy
of course it says something: he was smart enough to go into a field he liked.
 

BerlinDude

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I know this is something completely unheard of from a med school applicant, but I want to help people. Also, I like science.

One other thing, as an MD you are the person your idiot friends come to with stupid medical questions. I look forward to telling them that yes, spring water can indeed prevent cancer.
 

Vulcan

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In what other profession can someone come home and say they cut open a human body (and don't say serial killer :p) and/or saved a life that day?
 

Vulcan

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The awesome stories you end up with.

One time in the ER, this guy came in with some major diarrhea. Of course, he wasn't quite right in the head either, so when he went to the bathroom he used the no-flow urinal. I'm not exactly sure how he did it, but there was liquid poo all over the back of the urinal and it filled the basin to the brim. It also looked like he didn't get it all in the basin, because on his way back to the waiting room he had a nice mess on the back of his pants.

One word: Epic

Haha ok I got one:

One time we had a woman who came in with a CC of rectal bleeding. I was shadowing the ER physician and he decided to do a Guyac (or however its spelled) to check for blood in the stool...merely as a formality considering that her digital exam turned up a bright red finger on his glove. When he tested it for blood, it came up negative...twice...so now we're confused. He asks her what she ate. She responds with white castle followed by red velvet cake. He and I came to the same conclusion at the same time that she had gotten diarrhea from the white castle which sped the red velvet cake through her GI tract. The poor woman was literally crapping red velvet cake.
 

YouNeverKnow22

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Me:Hi I'm a Doctor, I have surgery in the morning so let's make this quick
Extremely Hot Chick: Your a doctor! OMG! OK!

In all seriousness the human body is simply amazing, and no other job has some of the unique experience/people interactions doctors have. Especially since I'm interested in surgery, it never gets boring and you actually apply what you learn......AMAZING in my opinion what these surgeons do and hope to achieve the academic intellect they attain.
 

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unlike other health professions, medicine allows autonomy. Other health professions require you to follow code,or things that have been for the most part laid out for you, such as EMS.
And medicine is dynamic, it requires you to be a student for a long time.

And medicine is where the ladies are.