What do you think the MCAT averages for the new schools will be?

Jun 13, 2011
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Do you think the three opening DO schools will have lower entry stats than the other DO schools?
It might be a misconception that new schools will have lower stats. I think it really depends on the school's mission statement as well. When UCF (MD) opened, they wanted to make sure they had a good applicant pool so they had minimum gpa requirements and even offered the inaugural class 100% tuition scholarship. FIU (MD) on the other hand did not have any cut offs. However, after the 1st year, they implemented minimum requirements. Also, someone correct me if I am wrong but when I visited one of the new DO school's admission site, there might have been a comment about minimum requirements.
 

dntke1518

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Someone else had stated the minimum requirement, so I believe you are on the right track. I doubt that these schools will be in the dirt as far as stats but more like middle-to-low end of the pack, like Marian for example give instate preference to Indiana residents. Just an example... and think about it, it will be more dificult to get someone who gets into DMU, CCOM, ect to go to a brand new school and be a guinea pig.
 

MedPR

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I think they will have lower stats only because they will have a lot of lower-stat applicants. People with average GPA/MCAT scores probably won't apply because they know they have a chance to matriculate into a school with established credentials.

Will the new schools be less choosy than the more established schools? Maybe not, but they can only build a class from the applicant pool they get. In other words, if all they get are low-stat applicants, then their class average will be low.
 

HM3

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I think they will have lower stats only because they will have a lot of lower-stat applicants. People with average GPA/MCAT scores probably won't apply because they know they have a chance to matriculate into a school with established credentials.

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Yes they will. These new schools will have MANY applicants; especially from ones within their state.
 

411309

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Im almost certain theyll have low end stats their first year. For one, Campell and Alabama give state/regional preference, not 100% sure about marian . For two, most if its applicants will be prob be the low to middle end of the applicant pool. The idea that they're new schools turns a lot of applicants off im sure that would prefer to go to places like DMU.

id estimate that theyll be a little lower but nothing crazy. Im guessing around a 25-26 mcat average maybe 3.3 cum and science gpas?
 

MedPR

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Im almost certain theyll have low end stats their first year. For one, Campell and Alabama give state/regional preference, not 100% sure about marian . For two, most if its applicants will be prob be the low to middle end of the applicant pool. The idea that they're new schools turns a lot of applicants off im sure that would prefer to go to places like DMU.

id estimate that theyll be a little lower but nothing crazy. Im guessing around a 25-26 mcat average maybe 3.3 cum and science gpas?
I'm thinking 3.3/25 as well especially if there MD schools in the area. Lower stat nearby MD schools will result in even lower stats for these new DO schools.
 

chiddler

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It might be a misconception that new schools will have lower stats. I think it really depends on the school's mission statement as well. When UCF (MD) opened, they wanted to make sure they had a good applicant pool so they had minimum gpa requirements and even offered the inaugural class 100% tuition scholarship. FIU (MD) on the other hand did not have any cut offs. However, after the 1st year, they implemented minimum requirements. Also, someone correct me if I am wrong but when I visited one of the new DO school's admission site, there might have been a comment about minimum requirements.
I don't think any of the new schools are offering a full ride for first year students. The minimum GPA for marian was low.

Lastly, why would highly qualified applicants apply to a new school when there are much better options? Surely only students who have no other options would take such an opportunity.
 

MedPR

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I don't think any of the new schools are offering a full ride for first year students. The minimum GPA for marian was low.

Lastly, why would highly qualified applicants apply to a new school when there are much better options? Surely only students who have no other options would take such an opportunity.
I agree. 99% of people with MD stats are going to apply MD, and probably 80%+ of DO applicants will go to an OOS school rather than a brand new state school for obvious reasons. Sure you save money on your tuition, but what happens if the new school fails after 2-3 years and/or your degree is not recognized after 4 years. All that money you saved just became an extra 1-4 years of tuition on a worthless degree.

Personally I'd rather pay $50k per year for a DO I know will be honored than $25k per year for a DO that could possibly not be recognized. Not everyone is willing to pay more for a sure thing though.
 

capazzo22

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I agree. 99% of people with MD stats are going to apply MD, and probably 80%+ of DO applicants will go to an OOS school rather than a brand new state school for obvious reasons. Sure you save money on your tuition, but what happens if the new school fails after 2-3 years and/or your degree is not recognized after 4 years. All that money you saved just became an extra 1-4 years of tuition on a worthless degree.

Personally I'd rather pay $50k per year for a DO I know will be honored than $25k per year for a DO that could possibly not be recognized. Not everyone is willing to pay more for a sure thing though.
So here's my question, just how often does that happen? I mean how often does a new DO school end up not being accredited? Just curious...
 

TriagePreMed

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So here's my question, just how often does that happen? I mean how often does a new DO school end up not being accredited? Just curious...
I think so far it has been 0%.

People will still go to those schools. The power of staying nearby is too large to detract people completely. I for one would go to UC Riverside over nearly any OOS program.
 

MedPR

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So here's my question, just how often does that happen? I mean how often does a new DO school end up not being accredited? Just curious...
I've never heard of it happening, but the risk is there and it is not a risk I'm willing to take. Just personal opinion though.
 

torshi

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I've never heard of it happening, but the risk is there and it is not a risk I'm willing to take. Just personal opinion though.
Don't they tend to get accredited by the time the first class graduates? So that means a total of 4 potential graduating classes are taking the risk
 
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I'd like to apply to all three, but I'm OOS to all of them. Still hopefully they give OOS'ers an even chance. (Anyone know roughly how much weight they'll give to being instate?)

I imagine the stats are going to be around a 3.4/25

I actually like the idea of being apart of a new school, especially these schools they have interesting stories to them. Yes I do fear the potential for not acquiring accreditation but also there's an opportunity to be apart of something new, experimental, and the first class of a medical school!

How many people can say they were the first class of "x" school.

not many.
 

MedPR

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Don't they tend to get accredited by the time the first class graduates? So that means a total of 4 potential graduating classes are taking the risk
To be honest, I know nothing about the process. I do know that I would like to attend a school that has a lot of alumni in the field as to help make connections for the future though!
 

capazzo22

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To be honest, I know nothing about the process. I do know that I would like to attend a school that has a lot of alumni in the field as to help make connections for the future though!
^^this
Yes, a school can't be accredited until they graduate a class and so even if you were in the first class theoretically they could be accredited by the time you graduate (at least I think that's how it works) but it's true that you will at least have the disadvantage of not having as many networking opportunities having gone to one of the new schools. Wow, that was one long sentence!
 

MedPR

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I will say that it would be pretty awesome to be in the first class of students. You and your classmates would be the only people on campus and though there are several disadvantages associated with that (no 2nd/3rd years to ask for advice) it would still be cool.
 

DrWily

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First class would be disasterous. Kinks not worked out, rotation sites not fleshed out, no prior years notes, no alumni network etc etc. I would never be the first class because no one cares that you were the first class of such and such school. They care how good of a physician you are and when the deck is stacked against you, its adding more difficulty to an already difficult education. Ya people do it, but its not ideal. Last resort, i'd take a spot before going carrib.

Case in point: that pwnu student who had a nurse as his surgery preceptor
 

angldrps

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So here's my question, just how often does that happen? I mean how often does a new DO school end up not being accredited? Just curious...
i read once on SDN that in the last 95 years, this has never happened.
 
OP
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I understand the dig against not having a strong networking system.

But to me the appeal is I get more opportunity to be a leader, take more charge of my education and also get to leave an imprint/tradition to the school. The first class are always the seniors at the school.
 

HDaddyDollarz

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First class would be disasterous. Kinks not worked out, rotation sites not fleshed out, no prior years notes, no alumni network etc etc. I would never be the first class because no one cares that you were the first class of such and such school. They care how good of a physician you are and when the deck is stacked against you, its adding more difficulty to an already difficult education. Ya people do it, but its not ideal. Last resort, i'd take a spot before going carrib.

Case in point: that pwnu student who had a nurse as his surgery preceptor
While I agree with you, are there any positives to going to a new school?
Do you think the deans would really go the extra mile to get an impressive match rates or provide extra board prep because they are new?

Being in Indianapolis....Marian would be great, but very risky
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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It depends, if the schools offer their entering class scholarships and aren't going to be too area selective, then I'd imagine the states could be at the medium. However as those two things are unlikely and the schools are in states where their own MD schools have low stats, I'd imagine 3.3-3.5/24-25 being the top stats.
But again, it's all dependent on how the school markets themselves. They overall aren't impressive and don't seem to offer much to their students, as such they will likely be obtaining only the students who could not get into anywhere else. However like I said before, if they offer their students some cash it will boost their starting stats.
 

MedPR

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While I agree with you, are there any positives to going to a new school?
Do you think the deans would really go the extra mile to get an impressive match rates or provide extra board prep because they are new?

Being in Indianapolis....Marian would be great, but very risky
Nope.
 

DrWily

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While I agree with you, are there any positives to going to a new school?
Do you think the deans would really go the extra mile to get an impressive match rates or provide extra board prep because they are new?

Being in Indianapolis....Marian would be great, but very risky
Like ^^ said above, new schools will sometimes offer full rides to the first years which can save a chunk of change. Also RVU (new-ish school) did have good pass rates for COMLEX by offering good board prep material, but pass rates don't really mean jack. Every school provides you with board prep material and how well you do is based only on how well you study (not on the prep material provided).

The cons far outweigh the pros but if you are desperate and don't get an acceptance anywhere else, then do what you gotta do.
 

poopyhead

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Im almost certain theyll have low end stats their first year. For one, Campell and Alabama give state/regional preference, not 100% sure about marian . For two, most if its applicants will be prob be the low to middle end of the applicant pool. The idea that they're new schools turns a lot of applicants off im sure that would prefer to go to places like DMU.

id estimate that theyll be a little lower but nothing crazy. Im guessing around a 25-26 mcat average maybe 3.3 cum and science gpas?
IS preference doesn't always lead to low stats i.e. UMDNJ has the highest DO stats and is a public school.
 

angldrps

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Personally, I plan on applying to all the new schools simply because I will be facing relatively less competition at these schools as students with higher stats are more likely to reject any offers from new schools in pursuit of more established schools . I think of it this way: will i rather have to go through the hell of being a re applicant and go through this whole process all over again or have the chance to start medical school next fall. Yes, the risks are there and they are all valid but I am willing to face all difficulties that may come my way as long as i can achieve the goal of becoming a medical student. Also, when was the last time we even heard about a new medical school failing and letting their graduates left with no degree and only debt? Just my 2 cents.
 

capazzo22

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Well more power to you. I have always believed deep down inside that it isn't really the school that makes the doctor. That being said I'm still hoping to get in just about ANYWHERE other than one of the new schools. THAT being said, ya I just might prefer one of them to another year of apps. Lol
 

DocEspana

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So here's my question, just how often does that happen? I mean how often does a new DO school end up not being accredited? Just curious...
Hasn't happened in over 102 years in the US. DO or MD.
 

MedPR

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IS preference doesn't always lead to low stats i.e. UMDNJ has the highest DO stats and is a public school.
Do you have data to support this? It would help many of us in our application process.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Do you have data to support this? It would help many of us in our application process.
UMDNJ has very high stats, probably top 3. They tend to be selective for their own state's residents as New Jersey has more than enough high quality applicants.

@Poopyhead, some states are on average smarter than others. States like New Jersey statistically are producing a lot higher caliber candidates than states like Mississippi. So yes, Marian, Alabama, Campbell, not really in areas with renowned intellectual communities, their own medical schools (MD) on average are lower than the countries average. So yah, lower stats are expected.