May 20, 2017
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I'm interested in the jobs in Norcal or Socal, which I know is highly competitive. I've been having difficulty finding hard, statistical data around what factors influence job placement post-residency.

I'm looking for something like the following (emergency medicine residency match factors), but for job placement post-residency.

Otherwise, the factors I've seen that are important are:
-prestige of program because those programs are more likely to have better-connected doctors who can go to bat for you
-a program that will train you well
-All else equal, 3 year is generally better than 4 years because you can make an extra year of income

Thanks in advance!
 

The White Coat Investor

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The real world isn't like getting into college, med school, or residency. Sorry.

Competent on paper (mostly a "good" residency), friendly at the interview (i.e. do we want to work with you the rest of our careers), and with a personal connection (it's sometimes more about who you know than what you know). That's what gets you a job.
 

TheComebacKid

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From what I can tell doing just some cursory research on this topic, many highly desirable places such as SoCal and NorCal are highly inbred when it comes to who they hire. People who trained locally usually get the first crack at those jobs. That's not to say that you can't get a job there if you are coming from an out of state residency, but you don't have the same leg up as those who trained in the area.

Employers know what they are getting from the local crop because they have hired them for years. But I still think they will still likely take a chance on you if you seem like a good fit.
 
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bravotwozero

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NorCal and SoCal do not have tight markets. I've seen plenty of job ads for them in the ACEP newsletter and annals, some are even from SDGs.

The quality of those jobs may be debatable, and the pay is likely to suck given the locations. But it isn't hard to find jobs there.


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Dr.McNinja

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Pretty much, if they have an ad in any trade paper you've seen, your pulse is the only thing you need. ABEM helps.
There are some tight markets, or places where you have to know somebody. It's never bad to know people, but for the overwhelming number of jobs out there it isn't needed.
 
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Birdstrike

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Pretty much, if they have an ad in any trade paper you've seen, your pulse is the only thing you need. ABEM helps.
There are some tight markets, or places where you have to know somebody. It's never bad to know people, but for the overwhelming number of jobs out there it isn't needed.
Yep. A warm body with a pulse and the right paperwork to fill a shift and reliably jump when asked to jump, without grumble or complaint. Not unlike most other things called "jobs."


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Vandalia

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Pretty much as explained above. Early in my career a grizzled-old physician said this about the ideal new doctor, "Someone you hire in February, who starts in July, and at the Christmas party you have no idea that they even work here."
 
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HooliganSnail

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I'm interested in the jobs in Norcal or Socal, which I know is highly competitive. I've been having difficulty finding hard, statistical data around what factors influence job placement post-residency.

I'm looking for something like the following (emergency medicine residency match factors), but for job placement post-residency.

Otherwise, the factors I've seen that are important are:
-prestige of program because those programs are more likely to have better-connected doctors who can go to bat for you
-a program that will train you well
-All else equal, 3 year is generally better than 4 years because you can make an extra year of income

Thanks in advance!

Once you are done with residency, you never have to worry about working again. Places will line up to have you work for them. You will get emails weekly about openings. You will get cold calls begging you to cover a tricky weekend.

Some sites in everyone's favorite cities will always been well staffed, but for the most part it's all available.

Em is EM no matter where you work, and I think working at a rural place is more fun anyways. Less volume, high acuity.
 
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