What is a must have pocket reference for surgical interns

Discussion in 'Surgery and Surgical Subspecialties' started by ribspreader, Jun 3, 2008.

  1. ribspreader

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    yo,

    was wondering if you could suggest some must have pocket references (especially surgically oriented) one needs during intern year.....??

    and what are some thing you wish you have read about prior to starting your intern year.....??

    gracias
     
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  3. SLUser11

    SLUser11 CRS

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    IMO, the best thing to have is a current Tarascon Pharmacopoeia. It will get more use than any pocketbook.

    I personally wrote all important phone #s and door codes, etc. on the inside of the front page. I also added in things in the notes section in the back (how to write pronouncement notes, doses for different drips, etc).

    I also would temporarily store all of my patient stickers in there, and then transfer them to a better location every few days.
     
  4. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Good advice.

    I actually ended up tearing out the cover and stapling it into the new edition each year, so as not to have to rewrite all that stuff down again (although by then I generally had it memorized).
     
  5. LaurieB

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    Is Tarascon better than epocrates? I have been using epocrates all through school and was planning on doing the same as an intern.
     
  6. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    The eternal argument...

    I'll bet I'm faster with my Tarascon than you are with your Epocrates!:laugh:
     
  7. LaurieB

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    Well, you're probably faster than me at all things medical =), but I'm guessing from your post that there isn't necessarily a big advantage of using Tarascon.
     
  8. maxheadroom

    maxheadroom Rhinestone Cowboy
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    Either Epocrates or Tarascon is fine . . . I've abandoned my PDA. Honestly, as a Plastic Surgeon I don't write for much, so I just call Pharmacy and ask the dosing of X.

    I'd say either the Mont Reid (which you probably got for free if you interviewed @ Cinci) or the Wash Manual.

    I agree -- I had an index card with all of my computer logins, pager numbers, and phone numbers.
     
  9. Sushi Chef

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    What about Lange's Surgery On Call, it has all the different scenarios that an intern could be called in middle of the night for plus step by step instructions on various bedside procedures.
     
  10. San_Juan_Sun

    San_Juan_Sun Professor of Life

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    I've got Surgery On Call. I used it maybe 10 times. It just to be too much to carry around, so I put it in my call bag and used it enough I guess. The procedures part is okay. I know it sounds funny ("Yes Mr. Smith.. I learned to do this procedure off the Internet") but you can get some good procedural stuff off Google that beats any book.

    My main pocket book is Mont Reid. But I didn't hardly carry it at all after new years or so.

    I do like Surgical Intern Pocket Survival Guide. It's cheap and loaded with useful info. I use my Epocrates the most. Right now in my coat it's a PDA w/ Epocrates and the Surgical Intern Survival guide.

    To the OP, I get by on the floors with that. I keep Mont Reid, Operative Dictations in General and Vascular Surgery, and Surgical Anatomy and Technique in my bag. I have access to Sabiston and Up to Date on all the hospital computers. And I've usually got ABSITE Review somewhere too. This is almost too much stuff.

    I've always been a guy that buys a bunch of books and spreads myself too thin. I think if you have a good pharm book, Surgical Intern Survival, and Mont Reid you'll be set to start. Then in the first few months you can see what your colleagues have, what is used at your institution, etc. And by then, you'll hopefully have a stipend from your program. :)
     
  11. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Agree with Mount Reid and the Surgical Pocket Intern Survival Manual.

    There are plenty of places as noted above to find out about procedures. The Field Guide to Emergency and Ambulatory Care Procedures is good as is the Manual of Bedside Surgical Procedures (which I like because it has a "shopping list" of items needed for each procedure).
     
  12. sponch

    sponch Senior Member

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    before you buy anything, spend a month as an intern at your institution. you'll figure out quicky what you absolutely need and don't. after a year of internship, the only thing i carry in my white coat are my car keys, cell phone, wallet, gum, and the patient list.

    who needs epocrates? all u have to do is dial 0, ask for the pharmacist, and have them take a verbal order. besides, you won't use 99.5% of the stuff in epocrates. the hospital operator is your best friend.

    references for procedures? use the web. ask an upper level or someone at your level who's done it. most of the time they'll even offer to walk you through it.

    textbooks? just use mdconsult. it has sabiston online.

    probably the only thing i found useful that i couldn't find on the web was Zollinger. but then again i have a thing for surgical atlases. it's like a cookbook for surgery.
     
  13. purplefish

    purplefish Junior Member

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    Also available online at accesssurgery
     
  14. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    Many hospitals have policies against verbal orders if you are in-house or have on-line access to the EMR; YMMV.
     
  15. sponch

    sponch Senior Member

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    all our hospitals have policies about verbal orders. it turns out that if the nursing staff and pharmacists like you they'll bend the rules. i go out of my way to chat them up and express my appreciation for their help and they typically reciprocate by making my life so much easier.
     
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  17. Winged Scapula

    Winged Scapula Cougariffic!
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    You don't have to lecture me about being nice to allied staff. I was probably one of the most popular residents in my program with them. But to assume that this will be the case for everyone or that every allied staff member will see fit to "bend the rules" is naive, IMHO. Many of them are more worried about covering themselves than making nice to you.
     
  18. DrDawg

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    Skandalakis pocket surgical atlas was useful to review surgeries before you scrubbed. Although lots of this info is available online at various sources, I didn't have to worry about finding a computer in Preop, or the MD lounge. Its big so I only grabbed it on my way to the OR. Absite will sneak up on you so I always carried mine, I could also us it really quickly to review things Clark, Breslow, ect, that I always seem to forget.
     

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