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What is an EMT

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by jaz_saini, Feb 21, 2002.

  1. jaz_saini

    jaz_saini Junior Member

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    Can anyone tell me what is an EMT adn what i need to do to become one.
     
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  3. UCMonkey

    UCMonkey Senior Member
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    EMT stands for Emergency Medical Technician. They work on ambulances and in some Emergency Rooms. They are trained to provide "basic" care - that is, they can do things like badage wounds, splint orthopedic injuries, and CPR and artificial ventilation. Many are now trained to operate autmated external defibrillators. "Advanced" interventions that are not part of the basic EMT scope of practice include administering drugs, intubating, interpreting EKG tracings, and operating a manual defibrillator (which requires the interpretation of EKG tracings).

    What you need to become tends to vary by locality (usually by state). I see you're from Seattle, and while I can't speak about Washington, I can tell you that in California, EMT courses are often offered at junior colleges. I believe the requirements are ~100 classroom hours. Many programs also require some ride-along time on an ambulance and some time spent observing and helping as much as possible in an ER.

    You can find more information at the National Registry of EMT's web site. Here's the link: <a href="http://www.nremt.org" target="_blank">NREMT Web Page</a>

    You might also look at your state government's web site under Emergency Servies or EMS or something similar.
     
  4. FLY

    FLY Senior Member
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    From what I been reading, EMT stands for Emergency Medical Technician and you could find more about it at a Community college.
     
  5. FLY

    FLY Senior Member
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    "The EMT curriculum is designed to prepare graduates to enter the workforce as paramedics. Additionally, the program can provide an Associate Degree for individuals desiring an opportunity for career enhancement.

    The course of study provides the student an opportunity to acquire basic and advanced life support knowledge and skills by utilizing classroom instruction, practical laboratory sessions, hospital clinical experience, and field internships with emergency medical service agencies.

    Students progressing through the program may be eligible to apply for both state and national certification exams. Employment opportunities include ambulance services, fire and rescue agencies, air medical services, specialty areas of hospitals, industry, educational institutions, and government agencies."
     
  6. UCMonkey

    UCMonkey Senior Member
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    FLY - I think you are slightly mistaken. Around here, at least, EMTs and Paramedics are two significantly different jobs with VERY significant differences in training requirements.

    An EMT course here can be done in a semester or over a summer. It does NOT, I repeat, NOT include advanced life support instruction.

    Most paramedic training programs are at least 8 months if not longer. Also, to even get admitted to a PM program, several YEARS of experience at the EMT level are generally necessary.

    Also, I know of very few air medical services, and hospital specialty areas other than ERs that employ EMTs. (Air medical services generally employ people with paramedic training as a minimum, if not specially trained RNs).

    Also, I know of no institution that gives an associate degree in Emergency Medical Technology. The classes may be incorporated into an AA in allied health; I don't know.
     
  7. EMT has levels: basic, 1,2, intermediate, and paramedic. Many colleges have volunteer ambulance corpses, where they train you to be paramedics and volunteer (you'll probably take night emt classes in addition to your college courses for a period of 1 year and then you'll be certified as emt-P). here is one:
    <a href="http://www.sbvac.org" target="_blank">www.sbvac.org</a>

    another cool way to be emt-P certified is to go into army or air force special ops!

    "The Air Force MAJCOMs have decided what quals they want for PJ's assigned to their commands (ACC=EMT-P, AFSOC=EMT-P). Either way, it is good medical training. My EMT-I upgrade involved about 2 weeks of classroom training, 1-week ambulance ride alongs, and 1 week of final exams and practical evaluations. Not the easiest of phases, you have to stay in shape, and study hard! Medical exercises are also implemented throughout the rest of your time at Kirtland. It must be remembered that Pararescuemen are primarily RESCUE TECHNICIANS...this is what separates us from other medics in all the services. PJ's are skilled trauma medics, trained in all aspects of combat and peacetime recovery including ground operations (tactical, evasion, survival), water operations (jumps, SCUBA, hoist/litter ops, RAMZ, etc.) flight operations (all methods of insertion and extraction, aircrew/
    weapons systems procedures) and technical rescue operations (technical rope/litter evac, aircraft shutdown/access, etc.) making us uniquely qualified for a broad range of missions. "
    <a href="http://www.usafpararescue.com" target="_blank">www.usafpararescue.com</a>
     
  8. dwstranger

    dwstranger Senior Member
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    pj02007 wrote:

    "Many colleges have volunteer ambulance corpses..."

    :D I *know* you didn't mean they have their own dead bodies (corpses)... "Corps" is like "sheep" or "fish" -- the singular and plural forms of the word are the same. Here ends the lesson.
     

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