Jun 25, 2009
61
0
Tennessee
Status
Pre-Medical
I'm a little concerned that my pre-req grades are not up to par. I definitely learned A LOT in my pre-reqs and feel confident of my abilities in those areas....but confidence is not a number. Here's the stats...
Bio I: B
Bio II: B
Gen. Chem I: B
Gen. Chem II: B- (The B- is what I'm so concerned about.)

The following pre-reqs are good. :)
Physics I: A
Physics II: A
Freshman Writing: A

So, are the B's and B-'s going to kill me? Is a B considered "bad" in evaluating the pre-reqs? Thanks for the help.
 
Last edited:

Schemp

drawing infinity
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Mar 27, 2008
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The consistency of your Bs is probably of more interest to adcoms than your one B-. They are not going to break you, but they're definitely below average and you'll have to make them up in some regard.

I would really work hard on o chem and do whatever you can to earn As, and a solid MCAT performance will be very helpful as well. Those grades definitely aren't going to exclude you, but if you don't improve over the next year you'll struggle to find a school willing to take you.
 

amakhosidlo

Accepted
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Feb 13, 2008
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While I agree that the op should really take every opportunity to prove him/herself, a much more meaningful way of doing it (as opposed to simply throwing yourself at your next class) is to pick a bunch of upper division classes in each department to really, really try to excel in.

Didn't do so hot in Chem? Blow O-chem out of the water. O-chem kick you around a little? Beat down biochem when you take it.

You can't change the grade you got in a class, but you can give it some context. Doing really well in these upper division (300+) level classes shows that A) You really understand the material, including that from the class you didn't do so hot in that now serves as a foundation for your current coursework, and B) The class you sucked it up in may have been unreasonably difficult, and your (consistent) performance in these upper-level classes should serve as proof of your true abilities.

Bueno suerte.
 

JJMrK

J to the J
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Apr 27, 2007
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A few B's shouldn't hurt you as long as your overall GPA is decent.
 

AlanAlanine

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Aug 10, 2008
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you can make up for it with a great MCAT score, but it's not too favorable to have a B in almost every pre-req
 

PreMedHopeful

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Jun 11, 2008
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I'm getting a C in Gen Chem 2, and I feel upset, terrible, depressed, stupid, and just plain sad:/
 
Jun 29, 2009
392
1
Valeria
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Generally, it is considered bad to fail pre-reqs.

Wait, what's that? Steady Bs? You're cool. Put some more effort into MCAT studying to help offset that a bit. Personally, my Bio and Phys are straight As, my Chem is Bs\Cs, and they balance quite nicely. (upwards trend in chem though, C+ in Gen Chem II, B in Orgo I...)
 
OP
B
Jun 25, 2009
61
0
Tennessee
Status
Pre-Medical
Thanks for the advice. I know its not too good to have B's in half of the pre-reqs, but the rest of my grades (with the exception of one political science class that I made a C in...long story.) are A's. So, hopefully I can get A's in Organic to balance out the others.
 

alexfoleyc

Senior Member
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Jul 5, 2007
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I'm a little concerned that my pre-req grades are not up to par. I definitely learned A LOT in my pre-reqs and feel confident of my abilities in those areas....but confidence is not a number. Here's the stats...
Bio I: B
Bio II: B
Gen. Chem I: B
Gen. Chem II: B- (The B- is what I'm so concerned about.)

I made A's in Physics I and II. :)

So, are the B's going to kill me? Is a B considered "bad" in evaluating the pre-reqs? Thanks for the help.
Just try to do well in other classes. And stay away from Cs.
 

Mattabet

Doctor Thunder
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Jun 8, 2008
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:thumbup: Agree with the above. 4 B's are not the end of the world, but you're going to want to show that you're better than the grades alone indicate. Nailing a few upper division courses would be great, as would killing the MCAT.