What is neurology REALLY like??

BillyRubinstein

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Jun 4, 2008
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  1. Medical Student
    I'm a third yr. from SGU strongly considering applying for Neurology next year. I'm in my last week of my surgery rotation, and totally love it, but not quite sure if it trumps my inherent interest in neuro. I really enjoy the hands on part of surgery, as well as the ability the ability to "fix" people rather quickly......on the other hand, I certainly wouldn't mind the puzzle's of neurology that aren't so ameanable to a "quick action, quick fix" philosophy. I definitely will be doing a Neuro rotation after my cores are over, but I'd really like to hear what exactly your average neurologist does on a daily basis......how much "hands on" work do you really get to do, or is 99% of neurology restricted to diagnosing very puzzling cases that either are not able to be treated by a neurologist, or are treated through pharmacological means?

    Quick diversion - Prior to med school, I got published in two papers pertaining to stroke recovery research and managed to score a 99 on my step 1....I also come from St. George's University - is it worth applying to some of the top Neuro programs in the country with this overall background, or would you think it's a bit out of the question.

    THanks for the feedback - much appreciation...
     

    sleepingneuro

    de oppresso liber
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    Jul 10, 2008
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      Hey Billy,
      I am applying to neurology this year- I am also from an offshore school with 2 Neuro oncology papers from Cornell and Aced step 1 and 2.
      You need to realized that some programs will not even look at your application because of the stigma. So far, I been awarded 30+ interviews including some top places…
      However, remember that these top places, at least the research oriented programs, will only be interested in you if you are interested in academics. Good luck
       

      USIMGgrad

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      Aug 29, 2003
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      1. Attending Physician
        I'm a third yr. from SGU strongly considering applying for Neurology next year. I'm in my last week of my surgery rotation, and totally love it, but not quite sure if it trumps my inherent interest in neuro. I really enjoy the hands on part of surgery, as well as the ability the ability to "fix" people rather quickly......on the other hand, I certainly wouldn't mind the puzzle's of neurology that aren't so ameanable to a "quick action, quick fix" philosophy. I definitely will be doing a Neuro rotation after my cores are over, but I'd really like to hear what exactly your average neurologist does on a daily basis......how much "hands on" work do you really get to do, or is 99% of neurology restricted to diagnosing very puzzling cases that either are not able to be treated by a neurologist, or are treated through pharmacological means?

        Quick diversion - Prior to med school, I got published in two papers pertaining to stroke recovery research and managed to score a 99 on my step 1....I also come from St. George's University - is it worth applying to some of the top Neuro programs in the country with this overall background, or would you think it's a bit out of the question.

        THanks for the feedback - much appreciation...

        Seems that you would be a good fit for neurosurgery. And you make 3x the salary. Have you considered that? It's not impossible to match in NES even if you come from off shore school. If you rock step 2, I think you have a decent chance. Good luck!

        As per neurology, it is a fantastic field to be in. I think the most interesting and most difficult cases are managed by neurologists today. The hours are pretty good and the pay can be very good with certain subspecialties like Neuromuscular, Sleep, Pain, Epilepsy, Interventional (hours not that good). Inpatient neurology can be very exciting. Besides your typical stroke, seizure, headaches, encephalopathies etc., you will always have 3 or 4 very interesting cases that will keep your mind in the inquisitive mode. Neurological cases by far have the most interesting presentations in the hospital.

        In the outpatient you get to see and manage fascinating cases as well. Movement d/o's, behavioral neurology, epileptics, sleep, myopathies etc... there is great amount of satisfaction diagnosing and treating and managing these people and seeing there progress. It feels awsome when you know that not any other doctor can do what you can do for these people.
         
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        neurolddoc

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        Oct 3, 2008
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          I agreee with the excellent post by neurologist. I am in general neurology practice with a subspecialty interest and fellowship training in neurophysiology. I practice in a single specialty group owned by the physicians. Our lifestyle is excellent, especially since we have deemphasized hospital work and concentrated on the office practice. I start early in the am but I get home at an early hour to run/cycle before dinner. Our practice is big enough that we have a comprehensive CNP lab, Neurovascular lab, and we also do sleep.

          Practice in the community is mostly routine stuff but there is the interesting case that comes along on a frequent basis. That is really the challenge; to constantly keep your eyes open to pick out the unexpected among the routine.

          Compensation varies according to your type of situation. A solo guy running around to a bunch of different hospitals covering ERs is going to have different productivity than someone with more in-office diagnostics.
           
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          happywithchoice

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          Dec 17, 2008
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            There are plenty of on-hands procedures you can learn and the best part is that you can be done in a total of 4-5 years and bit out and working - Neurosurgery can be rewarding, but while the neurologist is working, the neurosurgery resident is still finishing up residency and the acuity of pt presentations is different. I say go for it - if you have a good foundation for it, it will only get more interesting. Good luck
            PGY2
             
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