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I have a B.S. degree with a 2.3 GPA which I received 1.5 years ago. I do not have any pre-reqs at all.

I am considering doing the following to get into medical school.

1.) Re-enroll as an undergraduate and get another degree with a major in Biological Sciences, it would take 2 - 2.5 years (72 credits) and I only have to take major courses as the rest of the degree requirements completed via my previous degree. Strive for a gpa of no less than a 3.8 in my second degree courses and get a high MCAT (30-40).

--Would schools look favorably upon a concentration of Physiology and Neurobiology vs. General Biology or it does not matter as long as I have the pre-reqs completed?

2.) Re-enroll as non-degree seeking student and take only the pre-reqs (30 credits 1-1.5 years) strive for a gpa of no less than a 3.8 get a high MCAT (30-40).

3.) Get a masters in biological sciences. (I do not see how I could do a Masters in Biological Sciences considering I have no background in biology as i have never taken any biology/physics/chemistry classes.

5.) What would be my chances of getting admitted into a medical school (non-carribean)
if I did any of the above and I scored high on the MCATs?

Thank you. :cool:
 

Frazier

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I have a B.S. degree with a 2.3 GPA which I received 1.5 years ago. I do not have any pre-reqs at all.

I am considering doing the following to get into medical school.

1.) Re-enroll as an undergraduate and get another degree with a major in Biological Sciences, it would take 2 - 2.5 years (72 credits) and I only have to take major courses as the rest of the degree requirements completed via my previous degree. Strive for a gpa of no less than a 3.8 in my second degree courses and get a high MCAT (30-40).

--Would schools look favorably upon a concentration of Physiology and Neurobiology vs. General Biology or it does not matter as long as I have the pre-reqs completed?

2.) Re-enroll as non-degree seeking student and take only the pre-reqs (30 credits 1-1.5 years) strive for a gpa of no less than a 3.8 get a high MCAT (30-40).

3.) Get a masters in biological sciences. (I do not see how I could do a Masters in Biological Sciences considering I have no background in biology as i have never taken any biology/physics/chemistry classes.

5.) What would be my chances of getting admitted into a medical school (non-carribean)
if I did any of the above and I scored high on the MCATs?

Thank you. :cool:
Look into the SMP option. It is a risk [being an expensive, rather useless masters], but is centered on getting people with bad undergrad gpas into a med school.

Reference this to get an idea of the odds of getting an acceptance with a given gpa/mcat combo.

https://www.aamc.org/download/157450/data/table24-mcatgpagridall2008-10.pdf.pdf
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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120 credits with a 2.3 average. You'd need another ~ 120 credits of 3.7 gpa average to get a 3.0.

Retaking 30 credits and getting a 4.0 + taking the pre-reqs + 2 upper levels at 4.0 ( 40 credits) = 3.025 +/- a few .0X.


Best shot : SMP after second undergraduate.

I've seen people on here overcome a bad undergraduate gpa through a science heavy masters. So after the pre-med pre-reqs ( At second undergrad or post-bacc) you could consider a masters. However that'd would require you spend time in classes to be ready for that program as well.. So I think that won't help since it won't reduce the time you need to spend by much at all.
 
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Suppose I get a 4.0 in the SMP program. And score over a 30 on the MCAT. Considering I never took any pre-reqs before would this still be of no help?
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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To get into a SMP you need a high MCAT and the pre-reqs done. Along with that you need to get your gpa up a bit ( They do have cut offs). Don't forget that a SMP is a hardcore and getting a 4.0 in one when you got a 2.3 in college isn't going to happen unless you've gotten everything sorted out.
 
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I'm sorry I ment the post-bacc program. I got the SMP and post-bacc program confused. Thanks.
 

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A low GPA like that would be best served to try to do grade replacement for DO schools or go to the Caribbean. Even grade replacement DO may not want to look at you because you have to take again at least 15 courses. Attempting to keep a 3.8 GPA over 3 years for a second bachelors is okay, but you have great room for error. Imagine you pull a 3.5 instead. You'll need over ~160 semester units to overtake the 2.3 to get a 3.0 flat.

Then you will go to an SMP? By the time you're done with just undergraduate and graduate work to get to med school you will have put a huge investment of over $150,000 (living expenses plus tuition) and probably have earned very little or nothing to offset it. Probably no school will give you a scholarship, so tag along another $150,000 to medical school (minimum). You'll spend a total of 9 years in school for 300k debt to start making 40k in residency. By the time you gotta pay it off, consider it a 350k debt with the interest added.

Honestly, getting into the pre-med SGU program in the Caribbean will get you out in 6 years with less debt. Personally, with those stats, I'd go that route. Plus, you won't have to worry about doing any volunteer or EC work.
 

WeAreNotRobots

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do NOT do a masters or special masters (SMP). this has no effect on your undergrad GPA, which is what the schools look at. you probably couldn't get in anyway. you gotta go back to a 4-yr university, do the prereq's and probably a second major. get your cumulative GPA above 3.3...heck, i dunno how long that will take if you start with a 2.3.

looks like you've dug yourself quite a hole...
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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do NOT do a masters or special masters (SMP). this has no effect on your undergrad GPA, which is what the schools look at. you probably couldn't get in anyway. you gotta go back to a 4-yr university, do the prereq's and probably a second major. get your cumulative GPA above 3.3...heck, i dunno how long that will take if you start with a 2.3.

looks like you've dug yourself quite a hole...
SMP were created basically to nullify a bad gpa. A heavy science masters for many has worked on here such as Willhem and getting up to a 3.3 would be impractical as he'd need to basically do another year of 4.0's.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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A low GPA like that would be best served to try to do grade replacement for DO schools or go to the Caribbean. Even grade replacement DO may not want to look at you because you have to take again at least 15 courses. Attempting to keep a 3.8 GPA over 3 years for a second bachelors is okay, but you have great room for error. Imagine you pull a 3.5 instead. You'll need over ~160 semester units to overtake the 2.3 to get a 3.0 flat.

Then you will go to an SMP? By the time you're done with just undergraduate and graduate work to get to med school you will have put a huge investment of over $150,000 (living expenses plus tuition) and probably have earned very little or nothing to offset it. Probably no school will give you a scholarship, so tag along another $150,000 to medical school (minimum). You'll spend a total of 9 years in school for 300k debt to start making 40k in residency. By the time you gotta pay it off, consider it a 350k debt with the interest added.

Honestly, getting into the pre-med SGU program in the Caribbean will get you out in 6 years with less debt. Personally, with those stats, I'd go that route. Plus, you won't have to worry about doing any volunteer or EC work.
Grade replacement + taking the pre-requsites will take him around 3-4 years as well to get him Gpa up to a 3.3 which is just 2 years less then the SMP route albeit this is if everything goes ideally. Not to mention the SGU pre-med program is slightly competitive.
 

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Grade replacement + taking the pre-requsites will take him around 3-4 years as well to get him Gpa up to a 3.3 which is just 2 years less then the SMP route albeit this is if everything goes ideally. Not to mention the SGU pre-med program is slightly competitive.
There's a lot less risk once you enter the SGU program than there is gambling on getting a 3.8 once your GPA has already been 2.3. I'm not saying it's impossible, but it certainly is a lot less gambling the SGU route.
 
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There's a lot less risk once you enter the SGU program than there is gambling on getting a 3.8 once your GPA has already been 2.3. I'm not saying it's impossible, but it certainly is a lot less gambling the SGU route.
Do you have a link to the SGU pre-med program?

I don't see how a 2.3 is going to affect me that much considering that I do not have a sGPA. And if I do start taking pre-reqs at a state university and I pull a 3.5 - 4.0 in these courses and in my new degree which would entirely be composed of science courses I pull a 3.5 - 4.0 total in that degree and nail the MCATs wouldn't the adcomms overlook my previous degree?
 

WeAreNotRobots

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I don't see how a 2.3 is going to affect me that much considering that I do not have a sGPA.
because it's a 2.3! people with 3.7+ are getting rejected as we speak...right now! check the threads.

and the GPA you get evaluated on is cumulative, science cumulative, and non-science cumulative...there's no "i sucked before" category and "now i'm super smart" category unless you make this appeal to each school individually in order to get their secondaries. although hopefully for you, the science cum can potentially stand out. but you're right, you don't even have it yet.

finally, you can't expect to "nail" a test that you haven't even seen the material for...your grades indicate the test will be doing the nailing.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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Do you have a link to the SGU pre-med program?

I don't see how a 2.3 is going to affect me that much considering that I do not have a sGPA. And if I do start taking pre-reqs at a state university and I pull a 3.5 - 4.0 in these courses and in my new degree which would entirely be composed of science courses I pull a 3.5 - 4.0 total in that degree and nail the MCATs wouldn't the adcomms overlook my previous degree?
You're cumulative gpa is the most important thing basically in the application race. Overall 4 years horrible performance will not be overlooked by another 4 years of good performance. There are ~140k applicants a year for around 50,000 ( MD + DO) spots. Those applicants who get in will usually have amazing gpa's, excessive amounts of volunteering and overall perfect records. Competition for admission is extremely high and people like mentioned by robot is so high that people with 3.7/30s do get rejected.


http://www.sgu.edu/school-of-medicine/sgu-premedical-program.html

It appears the pre-med/MD program is a joint BS/MD program at SGU.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Overall no, they'll look over your pre-req grades and then skim over your grades and see if there's an upward trend or if you had a semester of F's which is killing your gpa.
 
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A low GPA like that would be best served to try to do grade replacement for DO schools or go to the Caribbean. Even grade replacement DO may not want to look at you because you have to take again at least 15 courses. Attempting to keep a 3.8 GPA over 3 years for a second bachelors is okay, but you have great room for error. Imagine you pull a 3.5 instead. You'll need over ~160 semester units to overtake the 2.3 to get a 3.0 flat.

Then you will go to an SMP? By the time you're done with just undergraduate and graduate work to get to med school you will have put a huge investment of over $150,000 (living expenses plus tuition) and probably have earned very little or nothing to offset it. Probably no school will give you a scholarship, so tag along another $150,000 to medical school (minimum). You'll spend a total of 9 years in school for 300k debt to start making 40k in residency. By the time you gotta pay it off, consider it a 350k debt with the interest added.

Honestly, getting into the pre-med SGU program in the Caribbean will get you out in 6 years with less debt. Personally, with those stats, I'd go that route. Plus, you won't have to worry about doing any volunteer or EC work.
This thread gives me hope. :oops:
http://forums.studentdoctor.net/showthread.php?t=125347

EC means extracurricular work? This pertains to a research publication, etc?

Additionally, does AAMC calculate your GPA on a different scale as your undergrad institution? (Ex. undergrad does not use plus +/- system; AAMC does.)
 
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Someone provided the link.

If I haven't mentioned it before, I also am a "low GPA" student. Trust me, the time I'm investing in school and trying to do EC (extracurriculars)/Volunteering is already a big burden. On top of that, I can't earn the same way I would if I wasn't in school. I've also been forced to take my classes at a community college because everything is packed or overpriced in the bay area.

It's okay to have hope based on that one thread, but it is also important to assess your risks, investment, and the potential returns. We're talking about you being in the hole nearly 150k BEFORE entering medical school on top of your current student loans (if there are any). Each academic year will probably be around 20k with the cheapest living expenses (80k for 4 years), and then 60k more for your SMP. At this point you still have nothing to fall back on.

You should really reconsider the way you're going to go about this. Even with grade replacement you may have a hard time bringing up your GPA. Trust me, the Caribbean is the best route for you. It's fast and if you truly are dedicated you will be a physician. Plus, you can do the minimum work at a community college, get a high GPA and will make it into Ross and AUC most likely. SGU is preferable in the Caribbean, but Ross and AUC hold their own.

You have exaggerated, perhaps lied in this post of yours.
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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You have exaggerated, perhaps lied in this post of yours.
Actually I can vouch for him. He's not lying or exaggerating at all, if you have a low gpa and want to get into medical school you'll have to go through hell twice. All I can say is the way things are going you'll be spending between 4-6 years spending extremely high amounts of money to redeem yourself and following that you'll need to play the game of destiny and try to get in. If you do get in that/s another 8 years including a 200k debt increase. All he's really saying is don't dig yourself a hole.
 

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You have exaggerated, perhaps lied in this post of yours.
I would appreciate if you said what part you believe I'm lying. Perhaps you think all of it? Well, feel free to do your own research and see. I have absolutely no reason to lie or exaggerate. You being in med school affects me zilch. Even if you wanted to make up a crazy theory about getting rid of competition for the cycle it makes no sense since I'll be applying earlier than you.
 
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I would appreciate if you said what part you believe I'm lying. Perhaps you think all of it? Well, feel free to do your own research and see. I have absolutely no reason to lie or exaggerate. You being in med school affects me zilch. Even if you wanted to make up a crazy theory about getting rid of competition for the cycle it makes no sense since I'll be applying earlier than you.
Are you a post-bacc?

If you are giving me advice to go to the Carribean why aren't you?

Your last post doesn't seem to add up. Your taking classes at community college, you are a "low gpa student" yet you are advising others to go the Carribean and you are not?

how old are you?
 
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Actually I can vouch for him. He's not lying or exaggerating at all, if you have a low gpa and want to get into medical school you'll have to go through hell twice. All I can say is the way things are going you'll be spending between 4-6 years spending extremely high amounts of money to redeem yourself and following that you'll need to play the game of destiny and try to get in. If you do get in that/s another 8 years including a 200k debt increase. All he's really saying is don't dig yourself a hole.
Another degree 4.0 would be 2 - 2.5 years not 4. That would be 20K for in-state tuition. My cumulative gpa would be up to 3 - 3.1

I would say 2-4 years before I apply to medical school if I can nail the MCAT.

With SMP down the road as a last resort option then it would be 3-4 years (30K). I don't know how Triage figures 150K.
 

Avoidthetiger

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Another degree 4.0 would be 2 - 2.5 years not 4. That would be 20K for in-state tuition. My cumulative gpa would be up to 3 - 3.1

I would say 2-4 years before I apply to medical school if I can nail the MCAT.

With SMP down the road as a last resort option then it would be 3-4 years (30K). I don't know how Triage figures 150K.
$30+$20x2+~$10k(per year for living expenses)x4ish = $110 in debt + $5000 for relocating/applying to SMP and $5000 applying to medical school (though these might be overestimates, but with a 3.0 you would need to apply to alot of schools and hope).

Triage might have a low-gpa (but that could be just below 3.0 where less classes will help him reach his goals and not take years of his life). But I agree with him, I to would recommend the Caribbean route. There's no reason to put yourself through so much effort when the application process is still just a crap-shot. SGU, Ross, and AUC will get you where you want to go as long as you stay as focused as you plan to be making sure you get a 4.0 every semester for your second undergrad degree.

Good luck though getting a 4.0 every semester! I wish you all the best.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Another degree 4.0 would be 2 - 2.5 years not 4. That would be 20K for in-state tuition. My cumulative gpa would be up to 3 - 3.1

I would say 2-4 years before I apply to medical school if I can nail the MCAT.

With SMP down the road as a last resort option then it would be 3-4 years (30K). I don't know how Triage figures 150K.
Actually like I said a 4.0 with 90 credits would put you up to a 3.0. However if you're seriously thinking you can get a 4.0 in all those science classes when you're record just show you have a 2.3 I doubt it. A 3.0/40 has a 40% chance of getting accepted. However only .1% of people get that high of a score. So don't expect that
A SMP will cost you round 50k.
So 10k tuition ( 3 years min) + living expenses ( 5 years at min) + 50k SMP = Roughly 100k.
Simply saying this is the ideal reality. You're going to be fighting an up hill battle. While I agree the recommendation for Carib isn't the best, but the reality is that you've got relatively few options and Carib will possibly quicken the process. However like I said above another possibility is always to retake classes ( Nearly 60 credits, on top of 40 credits of pre-reqs) and apply to DO.

The thing is Triage is a low grade in terms of the medical school scape. You're a low grade in terms of you barely graduated. He's also a URM and overall has a shot at DO schools. For him Carib would be funny because he's pretty much got relatively few things he needs to attack before applying relatively on time. Where as you need to at the very least take 3 years to regroup and rework your grades including taking the pre-reqs which a lot of people have trouble getting A's in.
 
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Carribean MD degree is mostly worthless. Little to no chance of finding residency in the states if you don't score 100% on every board exam. And still if you do its an uphill battle to get residency on the mainland.

I'm not going to attempt for a Carribean MD degree no matter what.

I am going to take the challenge. Even if the odds are stacked against me.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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And I would frankly agree. Though SGU has a decent match rate. But regardless, if you work hard then you'll make it. You'll just need to realize that you'll be spending between 3-5 years before being ready to even apply. So I recommend you simply think this all through.
 

Avoidthetiger

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Carribean MD degree is mostly worthless. Little to no chance of finding residency in the states if you don't score 100% on every board exam. And still if you do its an uphill battle to get residency on the mainland.

I'm not going to attempt for a Carribean MD degree no matter what.

I am going to take the challenge. Even if the odds are stacked against me.
You statement is mostly true, which is why SDN generally discourages going to the Caribbean but if you are as dedicated as you sound to fight an uphill battle to get into a US medical school, you will work hard in the Caribbean and actually get a residency in the US. SGU, Ross, and AUC have students go into US residency every year -- some just drop out because they can't handle the rigor of medical school, which is why they weren't accepted in the US.

Additionally, there is no 100% on the board exam. You need to score high on the board (above a 220), but you probably want to do that well regardless... even if you stay in the US for medical school. I know students currently down in the Caribbean, and they are doing fine -- seriously, I would recommend considering this option if you are truly serious about going to medical school. Research more into the Caribbean option.
 

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Are you a post-bacc?

If you are giving me advice to go to the Carribean why aren't you?

Your last post doesn't seem to add up. Your taking classes at community college, you are a "low gpa student" yet you are advising others to go the Carribean and you are not?

how old are you?
26. I am post-bacc. I am low GPA, but I'm not a 2.3 GPA. I'm at 2.9 right now and will likely be at the 3.1 range by the time I'm done. I will have zero re-takes on my record and will have a 3.75 sGPA. I hate saying this because of what it implies, but I also am a URM/disadvantaged and so the odds are slightly better for me. This is entirely different than having a 2.3, having to do an entire second bachelors, going to SMP and then medical school.

If you don't want Caribbean, don't. Just be aware that you could become a doctor 2-3 years earlier without as much debt but instead choose to gamble and possibly end up in the same place.
 

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Another degree 4.0 would be 2 - 2.5 years not 4. That would be 20K for in-state tuition. My cumulative gpa would be up to 3 - 3.1

I would say 2-4 years before I apply to medical school if I can nail the MCAT.

With SMP down the road as a last resort option then it would be 3-4 years (30K). I don't know how Triage figures 150K.
2 years to offset a 2.3 into a 3.1? Impossible. A standard bachelors is 120 units. 120 units at 2.3 + 120 units at 4.0 = 3.15. Here's the calculator: http://www.back2college.com/gpa.htm Are you really going to take 30 units (that's 7 to 8 classes) a semester to get out in 2 years?

It seems you haven't even done the basic math. You will be charged 120 units. You won't be charged a flat fee for year. Now with a realistic 15 units a semester, you will do this in 4 years. 1 year of school will cost you $20,000. about $8-9k in tuition and books and about $11-12k in living expenses. This is an extremely conservative estimate. Then an SMP will be $40-60k in tuition alone plus living expenses. Do the basic math and you end up at about $150k in the hole. This is not accounting for unexpected things like car breaking down, putting in gas, going out and having fun, etc. This is not even algebra and you're blowing it.
 
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2 years to offset a 2.3 into a 3.1? Impossible. A standard bachelors is 120 units. 120 units at 2.3 + 120 units at 4.0 = 3.15. Here's the calculator: http://www.back2college.com/gpa.htm Are you really going to take 30 units (that's 7 to 8 classes) a semester to get out in 2 years?

It seems you haven't even done the basic math. You will be charged 120 units. You won't be charged a flat fee for year. Now with a realistic 15 units a semester, you will do this in 4 years. 1 year of school will cost you $20,000. about $8-9k in tuition and books and about $11-12k in living expenses. This is an extremely conservative estimate. Then an SMP will be $40-60k in tuition alone plus living expenses. Do the basic math and you end up at about $150k in the hole. This is not accounting for unexpected things like car breaking down, putting in gas, going out and having fun, etc. This is not even algebra and you're blowing it.
Lol, don't exert your pseudo superiority-complex upon me. I know how much tuition at my university costs and what I need to get a 3.0 at my school.

FIY 30 credits is 5 classes a semester. I'm placing no credence in your posts anymore, so stop hopping up and down like your are "smart" when:

1.) you are taking pre-reqs at a community college with some bull**** excuse that all the classes at state university were filled.

2.) you got a 2.9 or less in your undergrad and you probably studied. I have a 2.3 without ever studying or buying any books.


4.) You are banking on being a URM to get you in medschool with some bull**** economically/ethnically disadvantage excuse. Pathetic.

4.) Your posts have been filled with exaggarated statistical nonsense.

Do yourself a favor and do not reply anymore.
 
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TriagePreMed

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Lol, don't exert your pseudo superiority-complex upon me. I know how much tuition at my university costs and what I need to get a 3.0 at my school.

If you bothered reading another degree would not mean 120 credits in my situation.
Getting a second bachelors is not necessarily 120 units, but offsetting 120 units with a 2.3 to make a 3.15 is 120 units. That's the argument being put forth, so stay on topic. Tuition, like I said, is not the only thing to account for. There's also living expenses.

I guess I'll walk away from this conversation since you're starting to piss me off. It started with me trying to help you, but then reality is too hard for you and you got defensive. Logic is hard for you too, so I'm not going to get anywhere with you.
 

Avoidthetiger

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OP, I am officially scared of you becoming a doctor and me potentially having to call you my colleague and work with you to help patients. You seem incapable of working with a team and listening to other-- which will be important as a physician. Individuals are only trying to help you on this forum. You don't have to listen to any of our advice, but if you come online asking for advice, we will provide you with some. No reason to disrespect anyone.
 
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You'll never be a US doctor. Most people here think that but won't say it.
What did you get on your MCATs?

Anyways 10 years from now I will be doing residency in MD and you will just be a DO. Face the reality of life.
 
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TriagePreMed

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What did you get on your MCATs?
Have not taken it. Practice ranges: V 10-11, BS 12-13, PS 8-9 (hadn't taken any formal physics/chem when I tried them). I'm hoping a 32 or above by the time I take it.

Anyways 10 years from now I will be doing residency in MD and you will just be a DO. Face the reality of life.
I don't know if I'll be an MD or a DO. Whichever one I am, I will be proud and doing what I love. I don't care about letters. You're a sorry person for putting down the DO degree when you don't even have a chance in hell to even get into a DO school.

You will never be a US MD graduate. Mark my words.
 
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PerspectiveDoc

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Have not taken it. Practice ranges: V 10-11, BS 12-13, PS 8-9 (hadn't taken any formal physics/chem when I tried them). I'm hoping a 32 or above by the time I take it.


I don't know if I'll be an MD or a DO. Whichever one I am, I will be proud and doing what I love. I don't care about letters. You're a sorry person for putting down the DO degree when you don't even have a chance in hell to even get into a DO school.

You will never be a US MD graduate. Mark my words.
Your not even smart enough to be a doctor. You studied hard and you only have a 2.9? Seriously, you must have put 10-12 hours a day studying for such mediocre grades? You probably didn't even have any difficulties in your life, and now you will claim you are a "URM" on the med school application and that will allow you to be a doctor because when you were born you weren't the brightest one in the crayon box. I feel sorry for the people who you will treat as a DO. :eek:
 

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Your not even smart enough to be a doctor. You studied hard and you only have a 2.9? Seriously, you must have put 10-12 hours a day studying for such mediocre grades? You probably didn't even have any difficulties in your life, and now you will claim you are black on the med school application and that will allow you to be a doctor because when you were born you weren't the brightest one in the crayon box. I feel sorry for the people who you will treat as a DO. :eek:
And you assume I must have studied hard. Notice I have never made this assertion. Reality or truthfulness doesn't seem to be a part of your existence.

Look at how you also assumed I was black. Doesn't surprise me you're a racist.
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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I don't know whats more funny. That you're being insulted for giving someone good advice or that you're being insulted by someone who barely graduated college and has a convoluted idealistic belief that he can somehow go from a dirt poor gpa in a likely useless degree to getting a 4.0 in a heavy science degree. Well I'll be damn sir, maybe you should go to a different fourm, I believe there's a nice place called 4chan that might be more tenured to assisting people in your situation.
 

painmd87

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Wow this thread fell apart fast!

If the OP is still seeking advice (and for future archive readers):
What was glossed over is that the 2.3 GPA is in non-science classes. Putting up 60-100 hours of 3.7+ work in the sciences (pre-reqs plus some upper levels) will leave him with an excellent sGPA and an upward trend. Combined with a quality, balanced MCAT, hands on clinical work experience, volunteering, etc., I think OP has a fairly decent shot right there at US DO and long shot US MD.

The downside is OP will have to show a better personality than has been displayed here. Yikes on that one.

(Also the US DO might not be in the plans since he did refer to Triage as "just a DO," so, yea... yikes)
 

TriagePreMed

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Wow this thread fell apart fast!

If the OP is still seeking advice (and for future archive readers):
What was glossed over is that the 2.3 GPA is in non-science classes. Putting up 60-100 hours of 3.7+ work in the sciences (pre-reqs plus some upper levels) will leave him with an excellent sGPA and an upward trend. Combined with a quality, balanced MCAT, hands on clinical work experience, volunteering, etc., I think OP has a fairly decent shot right there at US DO and long shot US MD.

The downside is OP will have to show a better personality than has been displayed here. Yikes on that one.

(Also the US DO might not be in the plans since he did refer to Triage as "just a DO," so, yea... yikes)
But you have to take into account the cGPA. There's very little chance for him getting into any MD program with a low cGPA. Even 100 science only hours in a 3.7 sGPA will offset a 2.3 bachelors (assuming the traditional 120 units) to a 2.9. Either way, 100 units is about 3.5 years of work + an SMP (and as far as I know they require a 3.0 minimum) and get a minimum of a 32 MCAT. All together we should assume it's 5 years later and have to account the admissions stats then. All of this work for him to have a ~30% chance to get in somewhere.
 

painmd87

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But you have to take into account the cGPA. There's very little chance for him getting into any MD program with a low cGPA. Even 100 science only hours in a 3.7 sGPA will offset a 2.3 bachelors (assuming the traditional 120 units) to a 2.9. Either way, 100 units is about 3.5 years of work + an SMP (and as far as I know they require a 3.0 minimum) and get a minimum of a 32 MCAT. All together we should assume it's 5 years later and have to account the admissions stats then. All of this work for him to have a ~30% chance to get in anywhere.
Oh absolutely you have to count on the cGPA being a factor. I didn't mean to dismiss it as irrelevant and I don't want it to seem that way. However, a 3.9 sGPA and a 2.9 cGPA may get someone to at least LOOK at the file in a few years.

A 30% chance of US admissions is probably better than his odds of getting a decent US residency with a Carribbean MD after you factor in attrition and non-matches.
 

TriagePreMed

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Oh absolutely you have to count on the cGPA being a factor. I didn't mean to dismiss it as irrelevant and I don't want it to seem that way. However, a 3.9 sGPA and a 2.9 cGPA may get someone to at least LOOK at the file in a few years.

A 30% chance of US admissions is probably better than his odds of getting a decent US residency with a Carribbean MD after you factor in attrition and non-matches.
I guess at this point it's up to the person to decide their best path. For me it seems that 5 years investment (losing money in tuition/living expenses/earning potential) for a ~30% chance after getting stellar grades seems too big of a gamble in comparison to spend 1.5-2 years in low tuition and then going Caribbean. Sure, the Caribbean is horrible, but a truly dedicated student can find residency, albeit not as good as a US MD graduate.
 

Geekchick921

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OP, why do you want to go to medical school? Do you have any medical/clinical exposure via ECs? You've never taken any of the prereqs either and I'm not sure why you are so convinced you will ace them, that being the case.


Everyone has already crunched the numbers for you, so I won't bother rehashing that, but the Caribbean schools are a viable option if you are dedicated, as others have said. SGU, Ross, AUC and supposedly Saba are the big four of the Caribbean schools.

And just for a real world example, my hospital has about 11 MDs on staff that are graduates from SGU, Ross, or AUC. Their specialties are Peds, OB/Gyn, EM, FP, Neuro, IM/IM subspecialties, and... drumroll please... radiology. That one did an IM residency first (in the US) then did rad. Anything is possible, especially if you actually heed the very useful advice people are offering you instead of insulting them. :eyebrow:
 

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Lol, don't exert your pseudo superiority-complex upon me. I know how much tuition at my university costs and what I need to get a 3.0 at my school.
What is a pseudo superiority-complex?

pseudo means something like "fake" or "pretended"... So are you saying he has a "pretend" superiority complex?

Wouldn't your point be better served by saying that he has an actual superiority complex over a "fake" one?


...and lol at this thread.
 
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OP, why do you want to go to medical school? Do you have any medical/clinical exposure via ECs?
I have volunteered in an ER. Additionally, I have worked in a hospital before.

I want go to medical school so I can be a doctor as this will allow me to boss around all the nurses and the PAs and yell at the sick patients. :smuggrin:

You've never taken any of the prereqs either and I'm not sure why you are so convinced you will ace them, that being the case.
I have pre-reqs books (physics, organic chemistry, microbiology books) and I've been reviewing to see if I can do it, and 100% believe after looking over them I can pull A's. And most importantly I find the material is keeping me interested.

I have taken the LSATs and scored 165. -2 on the reading section which I hear is very similar to the MCATs Verbal Section.


Everyone has already crunched the numbers for you, so I won't bother rehashing that, but the Caribbean schools are a viable option if you are dedicated, as others have said. SGU, Ross, AUC and supposedly Saba are the big four of the Caribbean schools.
I don't care I have already made my decision and I've already submitted my application to re-enroll for a second degree. I asked for advice, it doesn't mean I'm going to listen to it. I did take it into consideration, very briefly, but no. I am not going to "aim low." I am willing to dedicate the next 10 years of my life getting into medical school. I know I will get in, its just a matter of time.


And just for a real world example, my hospital has about 11 MDs on staff that are graduates from SGU, Ross, or AUC. Their specialties are Peds, OB/Gyn, EM, FP, Neuro, IM/IM subspecialties, and... drumroll please... radiology. That one did an IM residency first (in the US) then did rad. Anything is possible, especially if you actually heed the very useful advice people are offering you instead of insulting them.
It is, that is why I will eventually be an MD from a U.S. medical school. :love:
 
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