lilek22

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As I continue to worry about the upcoming PRITE due to my program's requirement that you make a certain percentile score or "remediate", I'm wondering what the cohort percentile is? Is that your program, all the interns at your program, all the interns in the nation, all the psych residents in the nation, etc...?
 

splik

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it is the percentile for people in your class throughout the US (Canada is excluded) though the last I was aware they are no longer reporting this
 
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lilek22

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it is the percentile for people in your class throughout the US (Canada is excluded) though the last I was aware they are no longer reporting this
What percentiles do they report now?
 

slappy

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it is the percentile for people in your class throughout the US (Canada is excluded) though the last I was aware they are no longer reporting this
Last year's PRITE results actually had all of the percentile score reported previously (after that backlash of course -- I think this report came out in January after the initial one in December).
 
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Merovinge

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As I continue to worry about the upcoming PRITE due to my program's requirement that you make a certain percentile score or "remediate", I'm wondering what the cohort percentile is? Is that your program, all the interns at your program, all the interns in the nation, all the psych residents in the nation, etc...?
They show you versus: 1) Your co-classmates, 2) Your whole program, and 3) You vs same PGY year across the country. They were supposed to have changes to this but at least 2 years ago it was done as above.
 
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artorious22

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How much is the PRITE valued? Does it affect a programs accreditation if the residents do great on it vs not so great?

Thanks
 

artorious22

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No, but it just looks bad if your program performs poorly, as far as I know.
How does one study for this exam? It's not really conceivable to study all of K&S in one sitting right now. Can one just do the First Aid for Psych clerkship and do alright on it?
 

PistolPete

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How does one study for this exam? It's not really conceivable to study all of K&S in one sitting right now. Can one just do the First Aid for Psych clerkship and do alright on it?
I'd just do questions from old Prites which your program should have a copy of.
 

artorious22

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I'd just do questions from old Prites which your program should have a copy of.
I wish they would provide answer explanations for the correct answers. Otherwise you're just memorizing answers with no real explanation. It takes a load of time to be chasing answer explanations via google and it is inefficient.
 

masterofmonkeys

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ninjaprite.com
 

NickNaylor

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How does one study for this exam? It's not really conceivable to study all of K&S in one sitting right now. Can one just do the First Aid for Psych clerkship and do alright on it?
First Aid will not be sufficient - that source is intended for medical students and will not go into sufficient detail for most topics. I second Ninja Prite - it's not the best source but covers a good amount of content and is fairly readable.

That's really the only recommended source at our program. I've seen other recommendations for buying previous questions, but they're a bit pricey. I'm not sure of anything else.
 

artorious22

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First Aid will not be sufficient - that source is intended for medical students and will not go into sufficient detail for most topics. I second Ninja Prite - it's not the best source but covers a good amount of content and is fairly readable.

That's really the only recommended source at our program. I've seen other recommendations for buying previous questions, but they're a bit pricey. I'm not sure of anything else.
We should all get together and make answer explanations for previous questions.
 

artorious22

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Is the PRITE a requirement to give to residents? I feel like I don't even know enough psych as an intern to pass the damn thing lol
 

splik

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Is the PRITE a requirement to give to residents? I feel like I don't even know enough psych as an intern to pass the damn thing lol
nope it is not a requirement but most programs do use it (in fact it might be all US programs by now). my program didn't have us do it as PGY-1s. theres no pass mark, silly. it's a test to show how well the program is doing in teaching you, and for you to learn stuff and evaluate your strengths and weaknesses. your score should get better as you go through residency. this year's prite is particularly tricky because it's very heavy on neuroscience. there are always med student level questions too so it's not like you shouldn't be able to get anything and it might give a sense of where you're starting from compared to other interns
 

NickNaylor

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Is the PRITE a requirement to give to residents? I feel like I don't even know enough psych as an intern to pass the damn thing lol
Hopefully your program takes this into account. At mine, there is zero expectation that you will do well on the PRITE.

That said, you can probably do better than you think. There will obviously be some things that you'll be unfamiliar with (e.g., a lot of the stuff on psychotherapy, maybe some of the more esoteric psychological theory, etc.), but you'll be at a bit of an advantage because you will probably be more familiar with the neurology questions at this stage than you will be in the future. As @splik said, many of the questions are pretty basic - you either know them or you don't, and often the level of knowledge tested isn't that high. Some of the answer choices for some questions are clearly wrong, so even if you don't "know" the answer you'll be able to figure it out fairly easily. All and all, the PRITE really just isn't a well-written test, and a not insignificant portion of the content just isn't relevant to your daily practice.

I wouldn't worry too much about it. We were explicitly told not to study prior to taking it as a PGY-1; unless you've heard a good reason to actually prepare, I would take the same approach just to see how you do.
 
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My program beats us over the head with explicit statements that the prite doesn't matter as a PGY-1 and that only improvement matters, but then someone dropped that 50th percentile was required to graduate the program, so I guess it does matter.
 

masterofmonkeys

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PRITE is not a requirement but giving it helps t substantially satisfy one of the things that ACGME grades the program itself in. NOT giving the PRITE makes it much harder to demonstrate that a program is objectively quantifying, tracking, and intervening in residents' Clinical Knowledge. OPD could probabaly volunteer more here.
 

OldPsychDoc

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PRITE is not a requirement but giving it helps t substantially satisfy one of the things that ACGME grades the program itself in. NOT giving the PRITE makes it much harder to demonstrate that a program is objectively quantifying, tracking, and intervening in residents' Clinical Knowledge. OPD could probabaly volunteer more here.
Actually, the only thing the ACGME requires is that there be some formal assessment of resident knowledge. The PRITE is a convenient way to pay someone else to do that for us. ACGME does not care about individual or aggregate resident scores--but does require our annual program reviews and self-assessments, of which many programs make PRITE a part.
 

masterofmonkeys

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Actually, the only thing the ACGME requires is that there be some formal assessment of resident knowledge. The PRITE is a convenient way to pay someone else to do that for us. ACGME does not care about individual or aggregate resident scores--but does require our annual program reviews and self-assessments, of which many programs make PRITE a part.
I thought that's what I was saying. When I said not giving it makes it harder to demosntrate, I meant that there's nothing as easy and simple a solution for demonstrating formal assessment.
 
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HarryMTieboutMD

A couple of things (Splik, feel free to troll me, obv)

1) The PRITE is an asinine way for programs to assess resident knowledge because there is no correlation between the proportion of questions and ACGME training requirements

2) One does not study for the PRITE. If you are a good resident, you should be reading about your patients and big topics in psychiatry anyway. But hey, if you want to go ahead and memorize Erickson's stages or Winnicot or whatever other archaic, InterestingButNotClinicallyIUsefulForAPsychiatristIn2016 topics are on there just to get a handful of questions right, then go for it. (fyi I stopped memorizing crap like that after memorizing pediatric developmental milestones in medical school after we were forced to, and the exam had maybe 1 question and then forgot it all - didn't hurt me on any of the USMLEs or any other exam)

3) Most of the neurology on the PRITE is written at the medical student level

4) Given the level of education of the test taker (meaning, having taken the SAT/ACT, MCAT, Med school exams, NBME Shelf exams, USMLE Steps 1, 2, and (maybe) 3), this is BY FAR the easiest exam. The questions aren't tricky and are for the most part straightforward. Some of them are bad questions because of the stupidity of the topic, the difference between what the test wants you to answer and the real answer, etc, but they are all clear and straightforward if you have the knowledge base.
 
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Merovinge

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A couple of things (Splik, feel free to troll me, obv)

1) The PRITE is an asinine way for programs to assess resident knowledge because there is no correlation between the proportion of questions and ACGME training requirements

2) One does not study for the PRITE. If you are a good resident, you should be reading about your patients and big topics in psychiatry anyway. But hey, if you want to go ahead and memorize Erickson's stages or Winnicot or whatever other archaic, InterestingButNotClinicallyIUsefulForAPsychiatristIn2016 topics are on there just to get a handful of questions right, then go for it. (fyi I stopped memorizing crap like that after memorizing pediatric developmental milestones in medical school after we were forced to, and the exam had maybe 1 question and then forgot it all - didn't hurt me on any of the USMLEs or any other exam)

3) Most of the neurology on the PRITE is written at the medical student level

4) Given the level of education of the test taker (meaning, having taken the SAT/ACT, MCAT, Med school exams, NBME Shelf exams, USMLE Steps 1, 2, and (maybe) 3), this is BY FAR the easiest exam. The questions aren't tricky and are for the most part straightforward. Some of them are bad questions because of the stupidity of the topic, the difference between what the test wants you to answer and the real answer, etc, but they are all clear and straightforward if you have the knowledge base.
Totally agree except number 2. Just reviewing the past 5 years worth of PRITEs will definitely improve your score. Not that I think improving your PRITE score is meaningful but for people who need to do better for themselves, or are a program that requires certain scores, I highly recommend reviewing old tests to study. They straight copy some old questions and often times the themes are reproduced.

I also think memorizing random stages is complete garbage but it will come up again on the board exam...
 

masterofmonkeys

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A couple of things (Splik, feel free to troll me, obv)

1) The PRITE is an asinine way for programs to assess resident knowledge because there is no correlation between the proportion of questions and ACGME training requirements
I was able to find a few peer-reviewed sources indicating that high PRITE scorers were generally considered stronger residents clinically as well. Which makes sense since the PRITE is easy to study for. There was a broad, cutoff-type relationship I saw as chief resident and chief fellow (part of my job was PRITE rehab). People who scored below 33 percentile were not viewed as strong by a plurality of supervising attendings. It was not consistent above that level however. A couple of our strongest scorers were seen as borderline useless. None of our lowest scorers were seen as particularly strong. Had a strong negative predictive value in other words, but not a good positive predictive value.

2) One does not study for the PRITE. If you are a good resident, you should be reading about your patients and big topics in psychiatry anyway. But hey, if you want to go ahead and memorize Erickson's stages or Winnicot or whatever other archaic, InterestingButNotClinicallyIUsefulForAPsychiatristIn2016 topics are on there just to get a handful of questions right, then go for it. (fyi I stopped memorizing crap like that after memorizing pediatric developmental milestones in medical school after we were forced to, and the exam had maybe 1 question and then forgot it all - didn't hurt me on any of the USMLEs or any other exam)
Developmental stages are blah for gen psych. I think they're crucial for child psych though. Agree that they're overemphasized on Adult PRITE.

3) Most of the neurology on the PRITE is written at the medical student level
Based on my experience a few days ago, PRITE and board neurology are VERY similar.

4) Given the level of education of the test taker (meaning, having taken the SAT/ACT, MCAT, Med school exams, NBME Shelf exams, USMLE Steps 1, 2, and (maybe) 3), this is BY FAR the easiest exam. The questions aren't tricky and are for the most part straightforward. Some of them are bad questions because of the stupidity of the topic, the difference between what the test wants you to answer and the real answer, etc, but they are all clear and straightforward if you have the knowledge base.
I thought Step 2 was both the most straightforward and the 'best' overall exam in terms of ability to assess one's knowledge base and clinical ability. But I'm weird.