What is the most successful event throughout your Pre-Med career?

AlfonsTheGuru

Surgeons aren't what they used to be.
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Mines is finally having a neurosurgeon at least consider allowing me to shadow him.
 

cardzkp

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More of a personal thing I'm proud of. Got a C- on an exam in my first upper level bio class. Being distraught since I never got a grade in the 70s at that point, I walked into the profs office and told him to his face I'll get an A for the next two exams (who probably didn't think I had it in me). Lo and behold, with some dedication, I got two A's on following exams. Those study habits I formed from that semester remained with me since and I haven't looked back :cool:
 

StudyLater

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Weird phrasing. Do you just mean the most "eventful" event?

Full code.
 

StudyLater

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More of a personal thing I'm proud of. Got a C- on an exam in my first upper level bio class. Being distraught since I never got a grade in the 70s at that point, I walked into the profs office and told him to his face I'll get an A for the next two exams
That was the test.
 
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Taco Time

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During my freshman orientation, I was strolling the glossy halls of the university hospital's sixth floor, unit D. Of course, I had to test out my new, custom, chambray scrubs and makeshift white coat. I couldn't help but ease-drop on an attending, board certified in plastics and derm, around the corner asking MS3s a question about some dumb minutia in regards to a case. Using my holistic, altruistic, passionate, endearing doctoring skills, I dabbled through the googs for the attending's research on that said topic, peered round the corner, and proceeded to get brown stuff all over my nose.

And that is when I knew medicine had experienced an eventful, successful day. It needed me.
 

Spector1

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Doing CPR.
 
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oopsaloo

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Getting an A on my molecular biology final two weeks after my Dad passed away, bringing my grade up to an A- from a B. He was a molecular biologist. Being able to dedicate that to him was absolutely unbelievable.
Wow, that must have been really tough. So sorry for your loss. At the same time, this is so inspirational. Honestly - this has got to be the most touching post on SDN/pre-med experience I have encountered so far. I really hope you become an amazing doctor because I'm sure he would be very proud.
 

oOKawaiiOo

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Probably when I met this wanna-be doctor in anesthesiology residency at a bar. Clearly, she saw I was buying a drink and tried to bum a drink off me. Yes, she was pretty.

*Conversation at the bar*
Girl: So what are you drinking?
Me: Why? You want one too?
Girl: YES! Thank you!
Me: *To bar tender* 2 cups of water please.
 

Dr.Sticks

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At the moment.. Volunteering where I do
Hit the jackpot
I have learned soo much
 
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AlfonsTheGuru

AlfonsTheGuru

Surgeons aren't what they used to be.
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I'll PM you if you want to know..
Sure thing. I'd juts prefer if you'd shared your experience with everyone in this thread, but whatever makes you feel comfortable.
 

Carmiche

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I wouldn't consider it success necessarily , but the coolest thing so far has been getting to watch a surgery called a rotationplasty on a pediatric patient (which everyone should look up by the way, its an insane surgery). The kid had proximal tib osteosarcoma, so in order to prevent metastasis they had to choose between above the knee amputation or roationplasty. W/ AK amputation the patient would never be able to run and play again, so they chose rotationplasty.In short: rotationplasty involves removing all the bone (including the knee) from the distal femur all the way to the distal tib + fib while leaving all of the muscles, nerves, and blood vessels intact in between. Once the middle portion of the leg is removed, you are left with only the heel joint and foot. At this point they rotate the foot 180 degrees externally and bolt it onto the femur. The heel joint then becomes the patients new functional knee joint, to which a prosthetic can be attached and the patient will eventually be able to swim, jump, play, etc. The surgery is not a common surgery at all - the surgeon I was shadowing had been practicing for 20+ years and had only done a few in residency. He had to bring an article describing the surgery in a pediatric patient and how to calculate for continued growth in order to ensure that no revision surgery would be needed in the future. The surgery started at 2Pm and I was there until 10PM. And get this: that was only the orthopod's part. Plastic surgeons had to come and finish up for an additional 5-6 hours. Super brave kid, and as far as I know he had a great outcome.

Other than that I guess the most actual success has been getting accepted to an REU that will hopefully result in anywhere from 2-4 publications. Two are currently under review, one of which i am first author, so I'm crossing my fingers that they are both accepted.
 

Taco Time

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I wouldn't consider it success necessarily , but the coolest thing so far has been getting to watch a surgery called a rotationplasty on a pediatric patient (which everyone should look up by the way, its an insane surgery). The kid had proximal tib osteosarcoma, so in order to prevent metastasis they had to choose between above the knee amputation or roationplasty. W/ AK amputation the patient would never be able to run and play again, so they chose rotationplasty.In short: rotationplasty involves removing all the bone (including the knee) from the distal femur all the way to the distal tib + fib while leaving all of the muscles, nerves, and blood vessels intact in between. Once the middle portion of the leg is removed, you are left with only the heel joint and foot. At this point they rotate the foot 180 degrees externally and bolt it onto the femur. The heel joint then becomes the patients new functional knee joint, to which a prosthetic can be attached and the patient will eventually be able to swim, jump, play, etc. The surgery is not a common surgery at all - the surgeon I was shadowing had been practicing for 20+ years and had only done a few in residency. He had to bring an article describing the surgery in a pediatric patient and how to calculate for continued growth in order to ensure that no revision surgery would be needed in the future. The surgery started at 2Pm and I was there until 10PM. And get this: that was only the orthopod's part. Plastic surgeons had to come and finish up for an additional 5-6 hours. Super brave kid, and as far as I know he had a great outcome.

Other than that I guess the most actual success has been getting accepted to an REU that will hopefully result in anywhere from 2-4 publications. Two are currently under review, one of which i am first author, so I'm crossing my fingers that they are both accepted.
That's incredible! You're fortunate to have experienced that, and that's awesome for the kid (barring he's recovered well). Medicine is challenging, but the ability of offering life-changing treatment is an awesome part of it. I'm really interested in some surg specialities and would love to work with peds. Thanks for sharing!
 
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NotASerialKiller

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When soviet spies neutralized every surgeon in the hospital I was shadowing at and I performed a triple A repair on pure instinct.
 
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Favour517

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Having an A in Organic Chemistry. Getting a tutoring job.- its pretty scarce since people retain the same job all through.