What is the starting salary for a podiatrist right out of residency (1- 3years)?

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Windom Earle

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I'm really curious about this and haven't been seeing reliable answers. The answers are either all over the place, like 70k to 150k. Others have asked this, but all the threads are from years ago.

Someone on SDN posted a survey about "Young Physicians" which said something like 180k, but included bonuses. That seems a bit high, and what about without the bonuses?

For students graduating with 200k in debt, this is something that is very important. Can anyone help me out?

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bobtheweazel

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I'm really curious about this and haven't been seeing reliable answers. The answers are either all over the place, like 70k to 150k. Others have asked this, but all the threads are from years ago.

Someone on SDN posted a survey about "Young Physicians" which said something like 180k, but included bonuses. That seems a bit high, and what about without the bonuses?

For students graduating with 200k in debt, this is something that is very important. Can anyone help me out?

Actually I think if you look around here you'll see offers as low as 70K but nobody really taking them and you'll see people taking jobs up to 200K+.

Realistically it seems for most to be in the higher end of the 100-200K range, but it varies a lot depending on location and practice type.

But even if you put all of the posts on here that have offers and claims of how much they get paid and you assume that those are all real numbers from real pods, then that's still prob only like a dozen or so people. So I'd stick with the actual salary surveys and since you're asking specifically about starting wages that young physician's survey is probably the closest you can get.

I wouldn't ask for anecdotal salary information from one or two people on this forum rather than relying on the empirical evidence of a significant number of podiatrists given in the salary surveys that have already been posted.

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Windom Earle

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Actually I think if you look around here you'll see offers as low as 70K but nobody really taking them and you'll see people taking jobs up to 200K+.

Realistically it seems for most to be in the higher end of the 100-200K range, but it varies a lot depending on location and practice type.

But even if you put all of the posts on here that have offers and claims of how much they get paid and you assume that those are all real numbers from real pods, then that's still prob only like a dozen or so people. So I'd stick with the actual salary surveys and since you're asking specifically about starting wages that young physician's survey is probably the closest you can get.

I wouldn't ask for anecdotal salary information from one or two people on this forum rather than relying on the empirical evidence of a significant number of podiatrists given in the salary surveys that have already been posted.

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I think it was you who posted the Young Physicians Survey. What was it without bonuses?

Also, that's exactly what I am talking about. 100k to 200k is a BIG disparity. Why isn't there just a clear cut average?
 
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Cranjis McBasketball

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I think it was you who posted the Young Physicians Survey. What was it without bonuses?

Also, that's exactly what I am talking about. 100k to 200k is a BIG disparity. Why isn't there just a clear cut average?
Because the field is wide ranging as well. Do you work at a hospital, private practice, or multi specialty clinic? Where do you practice? What do you spend most of your time doing? Its all a wide range, this wide range in salary
 

Windom Earle

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Because the field is wide ranging as well. Do you work at a hospital, private practice, or multi specialty clinic? Where do you practice? What do you spend most of your time doing? Its all a wide range, this wide range in salary

Ok. What about a podiatrist working in a hospital in NY?

That's what I'd like to do =)
 

bobtheweazel

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For the young physician one the average was about 180K including bonuses. I'm not sure if it showed without bonuses since bonuses are a large part of many physician's pay structures. So anyway I'm not sure that's relevant unless you're planning on having all your future bonuses funneled towards @bobtheweazel which I must say is quite generous of you and so I thank you in advance.

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GypsyHummus

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To add some flavor to the thread, I have a family member in a private practice setup and asked what the base salary was. He told me that he makes around 10k/month for a base, so around 120k/year. He works as an associate right now and is fresh out. I'm not sure what his collections bonus is.

He gets typical forefoot pathology stuff and not a ton of ankle punted his way. Lots of bread and butter, surgery once a week for bunions and hammertoes.
 

GypsyHummus

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You also have to remember too, for a long time, there wasn't a standard residency time for pods. The mandatory 3 year foot and ankle surgery is realitivley new, and so a lot of the salary reports that you will find online will reflect the 1-3 year range desparity.

I have met quite a few pods, and I have yet to meet one who grossed less than 100k right out of school. With that said however, They had been offered starting salaries at the hospital they did residency at for 60-70k, but they were all smart enough to keep looking.

Most pods I know make around 180-200k gross, which is like 100-120k net.

I think it was you who posted the Young Physicians Survey. What was it without bonuses?

Also, that's exactly what I am talking about. 100k to 200k is a BIG disparity. Why isn't there just a clear cut average?
 

bobtheweazel

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To add some flavor to the thread, I have a family member in a private practice setup and asked what the base salary was. He told me that he makes around 10k/month for a base, so around 120k/year. He works as an associate right now and is fresh out. I'm not sure what his collections bonus is.

He gets typical forefoot pathology stuff and not a ton of ankle punted his way. Lots of bread and butter, surgery once a week for bunions and hammertoes.

So then to add to that I believe one of the surveys (ACFAS maybe) showed a typical bonus of around 50k which would put your family member at around 170k which I would say is reasonable for a new grad.

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Real talk: Base between 160-220k and brought home a production bonus between 80k-150k on top of base. This applies to graduates who can handle taking any F&A trauma call and high volume clinic.
 
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air bud

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Here is a lesson to learn from Ankle Breaker. And myself. And others.....write everything in pencil (figuratively) live like a resident for a year or 2, rent don't buy, all the things that smart older wiser attendings say. Coming out of residency you have no clue. You don't know what questions to ask. You are afraid to ask others. You are being pushed out the nest and you have somebody saying yeah I will pay you 200k+. You take it. But it's not all candy canes and cupcakes like Ankle breaker thought it was going to be when he was in 3rd year of residency. You can rationalize and justify a lot when you are feeling the heat.

Things change. Nothing is forever. Learn lessons and move on if necessary. There will be examples coming in the near future...
 
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If you guys do a search this topic has been beaten to death on here. I know I know. Money is definitely important but understanding the dynamics of the practices/hospitals/groups you will be joining is just as important. My starting base salary is probably in the 95% percentile of salaries in podiatry. Plus I have an RVU incentive bonus. But I can't touch the ankle in the state of CT until I get my "ankle certificates" which could be a thread on its own. Yes I am happy I am making real money but I am miserable at my job because I am literally using about 30% of my skill set. You can not put a price tag on peace of mind. I also work at a community hospital which in reality is probably a poor facility to do a complex case in the first place. Just trying to do basic cases there is a struggle. Instruments are not there when I asked repeatedly for them prior to the case. Sets are missing. Your scrub tech doesn't give a damn about your case and sucks at retracting. Your radiology tech can't take a calcaneal axial projection with the large C-Arm if their life dependent on it. Things that you don't really anticipate or think about when you are training at a high powered residency program and you have an army of organized residents and you have the same circulator nurse and scrub tech for every case. All these things make a BIG difference. I honestly don't think some of my attendings in residency could do the cases with OUT the residents. It's just impossible. All the above factors will affect your surgery, the outcome of your surgery, your mental health, etc. Then you will sit down and think about whether the "money" is really worth this hassle.

If you are joining a podiatry practice and you get there and they basically fill your clinic with their post-ops or problem patients do you think you are going to hit any your bonuses? What happens if the practice doesn't have a good relationship with other practitioners (MD/DO) in the community? Do you really want to knock on people's doors like a rep from a hardware company trying to sweet talk "Real doctors"? Does the podiatry practice take call at a hospital? You should not join a practice that doesn't. Taking call is key. Unless the practice really does have a great relationship with other community physicians and gets a very diverse referral base. What happens when you get there and you find out they want you to present all your cases like a resident all over again? Despite this being completely degrading and demeaning it can happen even if it is not clearly defined in your contract.

What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?

So yes focus on the money and the variables that impact your contract but I implore you to "fully understand" the dynamics of facilities/podiatry practices/ ortho groups you plan on joining in the future. Put these people on the spot during your interviews and get the information you need. Come prepared with a LONG list of questions and scenarios to understand how things would work out if "x, y, z" happened.

Who is wanting you to present cases?? Is it because your hospital has not had podiatry before?
 
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ksp2276

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Heres a copy of what I wrote on a previous thread-Hope it helps:


My starting salary (first year) is 200k without bonus in a multi specialty practice in an extremely desirable area near NYC. I anticipate to make 300k+ by year 3.

Let me tell you HOW I landed this job. There is absolutely no substitute for hard work and good social skills. None- I don't care if you got a 4.0 GPA in pod school, if youre an akward klutz, all that training is going to get you nowhere fast- Especially if you display elitism amongst your peers. FIX THIS FIRST AND DO IT EARLY. I worked my ass off in the face of discrimination from my upper years as a resident and even some attendings who saw me as a threat to their territory after I graduated from residency. I always made friends with everyone, orthos, plastics whoever I would spend extra hours in the morning and after work was done scrubbing cases and shadowing doctors. I made great relations with most of my attendings to absorb everything I possibly could.

My particular residency program has been around for 26 years and in those years I am the resident who has logged and scrubbed the most cases by quite a lot (according to my director). I always questioned tasks that I was assigned to by my upper years. If it was a waste of my time or education I politely questioned it and at times decided whether it was worth it. I cant stand elite programs who make you do busy work in the form of soft hazing. You have 3-4 short years, if youre in a program that makes you do unneccesary tasks that have absolutely no impact on your career ans a pod or a person then I would suggest making a change. Do it in the face of difficulty or discrimination. DO IT.. because guess what, when youre alone in practice, all that extra busy work your upper years made you do wont help you out of treating that pt appropriately. Now dont get me wrong most of the extra work that you get as a resident is obviously necc for your overall training, even at times when you dont think so. But if someone is making you unwillingly grab coffee or rearrange chairs in the office, yelling at you because they are insecure about themselves, do extra handwritten work that is meaningless.. you get what i mean. Toss that in the trash.

Rant over. Back to how I got the job. I did an elective rotation in vascular surgery, which at the time was brutal, just so I could get to know the chief of the department. That was it. All I wanted was to get some hands on work in the OR and to show face to the new chief. Long story short a cardiologist who operates in the OR next door kept seeing me during that rotation. He liked my work ethic and invited me to his office where he made me an offer I couldn't refuse. And here I am now typing on my lunch break from my office which I am extremely grateful for.

If you are ever discouraged by your peers or other pods... message me. You desreve to be paid what you are worth. You deserve to be in a job that you love. You deserve to be in a job environment where your colleagues show you immense respect and parity.

My recc:
1. Work extremely hard in residency getting whats best for YOU, work hard to impress others- someone is always watching even when you don't feel so
2. Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years. and if you are joining a pod group make sure you arent being swindled for easy labor for first few years. Get what you are worth and Future proof yourself
3. When youre ready create a binder that is custom made to the job you are applying to. Have in the binder your logs, presentations, letters of recc, letter of intent and 2-3 special cases you did with photos that you can explain to hte employer. something that shows your prowess in surgery and clinical judgement. Ex: Think profile black three ring binder with front pocket with dr. Smith's name on it. inside first page letter of intent, then CV then research then case studies and finally logs. Logs dont matter with jobs btw. Its all about persona
4. Be yourself. I got my job by showing my employer how ambitious I was and how dedicated I was to building this new practice for him. I truly felt that way, this guy is paying me a great salary and giving me the world of respect so in return I am encouraged to DO MORE because it feels like I am doing it to BETTER MYSELF and in turn better the whole practice. Be in a place that makes you feel like this.
5. HMU if you have any questions. Away with the naysayers.
 
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Windom Earle

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For the young physician one the average was about 180K including bonuses. I'm not sure if it showed without bonuses since bonuses are a large part of many physician's pay structures. So anyway I'm not sure that's relevant unless you're planning on having all your future bonuses funneled towards @bobtheweazel which I must say is quite generous of you and so I thank you in advance.

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Lol, good one Bernie.

How can podiatrists get bonuses?
 
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GypsyHummus

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I take it that you are glad you went the pod route instead of the MD/DO route?


Heres a copy of what I wrote on a previous thread-Hope it helps:


My starting salary (first year) is 200k without bonus in a multi specialty practice in an extremely desirable area near NYC. I anticipate to make 300k+ by year 3.

Let me tell you HOW I landed this job. There is absolutely no substitute for hard work and good social skills. None- I don't care if you got a 4.0 GPA in pod school, if youre an akward klutz, all that training is going to get you nowhere fast- Especially if you display elitism amongst your peers. FIX THIS FIRST AND DO IT EARLY. I worked my ass off in the face of discrimination from my upper years as a resident and even some attendings who saw me as a threat to their territory after I graduated from residency. I always made friends with everyone, orthos, plastics whoever I would spend extra hours in the morning and after work was done scrubbing cases and shadowing doctors. I made great relations with most of my attendings to absorb everything I possibly could.

My particular residency program has been around for 26 years and in those years I am the resident who has logged and scrubbed the most cases by quite a lot (according to my director). I always questioned tasks that I was assigned to by my upper years. If it was a waste of my time or education I politely questioned it and at times decided whether it was worth it. I cant stand elite programs who make you do busy work in the form of soft hazing. You have 3-4 short years, if youre in a program that makes you do unneccesary tasks that have absolutely no impact on your career ans a pod or a person then I would suggest making a change. Do it in the face of difficulty or discrimination. DO IT.. because guess what, when youre alone in practice, all that extra busy work your upper years made you do wont help you out of treating that pt appropriately. Now dont get me wrong most of the extra work that you get as a resident is obviously necc for your overall training, even at times when you dont think so. But if someone is making you unwillingly grab coffee or rearrange chairs in the office, yelling at you because they are insecure about themselves, do extra handwritten work that is meaningless.. you get what i mean. Toss that in the trash.

Rant over. Back to how I got the job. I did an elective rotation in vascular surgery, which at the time was brutal, just so I could get to know the chief of the department. That was it. All I wanted was to get some hands on work in the OR and to show face to the new chief. Long story short a cardiologist who operates in the OR next door kept seeing me during that rotation. He liked my work ethic and invited me to his office where he made me an offer I couldn't refuse. And here I am now typing on my lunch break from my office which I am extremely grateful for.

If you are ever discouraged by your peers or other pods... message me. You desreve to be paid what you are worth. You deserve to be in a job that you love. You deserve to be in a job environment where your colleagues show you immense respect and parity.

My recc:
1. Work extremely hard in residency getting whats best for YOU, work hard to impress others- someone is always watching even when you don't feel so
2. Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years. and if you are joining a pod group make sure you arent being swindled for easy labor for first few years. Get what you are worth and Future proof yourself
3. When youre ready create a binder that is custom made to the job you are applying to. Have in the binder your logs, presentations, letters of recc, letter of intent and 2-3 special cases you did with photos that you can explain to hte employer. something that shows your prowess in surgery and clinical judgement. Ex: Think profile black three ring binder with front pocket with dr. Smith's name on it. inside first page letter of intent, then CV then research then case studies and finally logs. Logs dont matter with jobs btw. Its all about persona
4. Be yourself. I got my job by showing my employer how ambitious I was and how dedicated I was to building this new practice for him. I truly felt that way, this guy is paying me a great salary and giving me the world of respect so in return I am encouraged to DO MORE because it feels like I am doing it to BETTER MYSELF and in turn better the whole practice. Be in a place that makes you feel like this.
5. HMU if you have any questions. Away with the naysayers.
 

Windom Earle

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I'm a little confused.

ksp2276 said: "Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years.

But Ankle Breaker warned: "What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?"

So, what's the verdict? Is it worth working with orthos?
 
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GypsyHummus

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I would think it's all dependent on the practice.


I'm a little confused.

ksp2276 said: "Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years.

But Ankle Breaker warned: "What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?"

So, what's the verdict? Is it worth working with orthos?
 

Weirdy

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I'm a little confused.

ksp2276 said: "Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years.

But Ankle Breaker warned: "What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?"

So, what's the verdict? Is it worth working with orthos?

The verdict is go in eyes open. Ask questions. Read people. Use your head.
 
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I'm a little confused.

ksp2276 said: "Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years.

But Ankle Breaker warned: "What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?"

So, what's the verdict? Is it worth working with orthos?

Ask about that during your interview with the ortho group, put it in the contract that you will be given priority to receive all foot and ankle trauma
 

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Ask about that during your interview with the ortho group, put it in the contract that you will be given priority to receive all foot and ankle trauma
That will never exist. "Some" is reasonable. Most is not. Priority is laughable. This idea that pre pods are being sold on about vastly better training involving the foot and ankle is laughable and doing them a disservice. And then they open their mouth at some point to then wrong person and set themselves back in the eyes of people within their local universe. Anyways...as I have said in past, the days of a podiatrist joining an Ortho group and being the exclusive foot and ankle person or coming to an end. Yes, there will still be some here and there but those days are gone. Too many foot and ankle trained Ortho out there now. And you are still a podiatrist. Don't forget that. Understanding that will benefit you more than you know. I am not saying that as a put down, but as a reality to help navigate the medical future.
 
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Cranjis McBasketball

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That will never exist. "Some" is reasonable. Most is not. Priority is laughable. This idea that pre pods are being sold on about vastly better training involving the foot and ankle is laughable and doing them a disservice. And then they open their mouth at some point to then wrong person and set themselves back in the eyes of people within their local universe. Anyways...as I have said in past, the days of a podiatrist joining an Ortho group and being the exclusive foot and ankle person or coming to an end. Yes, there will still be some here and there but those days are gone. Too many foot and ankle trained Ortho out there now. And you are still a podiatrist. Don't forget that. Understanding that will benefit you more than you know. I am not saying that as a put down, but as a reality to help navigate the medical future.
So, in your opinion, itll be mainly podiatry practices and hospitals that employ podiatrists?
 

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So, in your opinion, itll be mainly podiatry practices and hospitals that employ podiatrists?
Yes. And multi speciality groups.
Don't get me wrong, there is a need for surgical podiatrists and people are filling that need. My co resident is 16 months out and they are already hiring another. He was a fresh out to a hospital system that employs pods but at other locations. He is killing it. Did 384 surgeries so far and has enough for both forefoot and RRA. I am sorry if I come across as spiders and maggots and not candy canes and cupcakes. But there needs to be a tempering of the idealistic and overly optimistic brainwashed stuff said on SDN by pre pods and current 1st or 2nd year pod students trying to justify why they became podiatrists. I have lots of friends in great set ups. I have a very good set up, one that may get even better. There are good jobs out there. But there are pros and cons and too often people only want to look at the pros. It is the same in politics, people only watch the channel that justify their world views and automatically shut down dissenting opinions.
 
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GypsyHummus

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So we hear the good side of salary, how about people who are not having such a good time?

Do you know of people in bad positions, and what do they relay to you?

What about people in middle of the road? That is who I shadowed and even middle of the road podiatry ( bread and butter wound, corns, callus, every other week 5 surgeries) still seems like a pretty good gig.


Yes. And multi speciality groups.
Don't get me wrong, there is a need for surgical podiatrists and people are filling that need. My co resident is 16 months out and they are already hiring another. He was a fresh out to a hospital system that employs pods but at other locations. He is killing it. Did 384 surgeries so far and has enough for both forefoot and RRA. I am sorry if I come across as spiders and maggots and not candy canes and cupcakes. But there needs to be a tempering of the idealistic and overly optimistic brainwashed stuff said on SDN by pre pods and current 1st or 2nd year pod students trying to justify why they became podiatrists. I have lots of friends in great set ups. I have a very good set up, one that may get even better. There are good jobs out there. But there are pros and cons and too often people only want to look at the pros. It is the same in politics, people only watch the channel that justify their world views and automatically shut down dissenting opinions.
 
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ksp2276

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I'm a little confused.

ksp2276 said: "Pursue jobs in multispecialty groups or ortho groups first. I think pod groups are a dying breed and everything will either be absorbed or gone with the wind in the next 10-15 years.

But Ankle Breaker warned: "What happens if you join an ortho practice but they have some ortho guys who like fixing ankle fractures and other foot trauma because they are comfortable and they have no interest in giving it to you? What happens if the ortho group wants you to do just foot surgery as well as other general podiatry care? Are you going to be ok with that?"

So, what's the verdict? Is it worth working with orthos?


I personally dont have experience with Ortho groups so I cant say directly. But I am working for a multi specialty and it is very good and Im having a great time. its like anything out there you have to really look and see a good fit. I wanted autonomy and opportunity to work hard to build volume to get that cash money honey.
 
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Weirdy

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What do you mean by "do it in the face of discrimination"? Are you saying that telling higher ups "NO!" is okay if they ask you to do something not clinically related like getting coffee, etc? Wouldn't that give off bad vibes and make them think that you think that you are too good to do mundane tasks?
You don't get through 4 years of pod school just to serve coffee. Learn to grow a thick skin. Learn to stick up for yourself.

Time is valuable.
 
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ksp2276

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What do you mean by "do it in the face of discrimination"? Are you saying that telling higher ups "NO!" is okay if they ask you to do something not clinically related like getting coffee, etc? Wouldn't that give off bad vibes and make them think that you think that you are too good to do mundane tasks?
Mundane task should include writing soap notes, not getting sugary coffee for your overweight chief. If you try to be a people pleaser in RESIDENCY, you'll be left alone in the OR a few years later wishing you just looked out for yourself and absorbed INFORMATION to help you LEARN how to treat patients, instead of the whims of people who could care less about you.

Favors, and Tasks are two separate categories. Personal story- My first year chief tried to make me do things like this. I guess it was just standard because all the other first years did it prior to me. I flat out refused and did what I wanted to do, within the confines of my learning. She tried to prevent me from doing so, but ultimately I won because it was to better the residency program and it was done in a non selfish way where I was learning and helping pts/ externs/ attendings out at the same time. Constantly tried to bring me down all year- so much so that I almost was forced to leave the program.

when she left another upper year tried to do the same to me for ANOTHER YEAR; and I flat out told them from the beginning- "don't communicate with me unless its work related." That set the tone pretty straight. Instead I focused on scrubbing more cases, doing more work than the program has EVER seen. I think I logged over a thousand cases at a community hospital over the course of 3 years. I didnt do it to spite them, i did it because i loved it. I really did. Eventually attendings were so impressed that I was able to do almost anything I wanted regardless of what my poor intent upper years had in store for me.

Second year chief was amazing, and although he would never ask me to do "tasks" that were out of line; I would routinely help him with favors, like printing out sheets, taking care of a few phone calls, cleaning up the census etc. That was because this guy selflessly helped us out so much that we were inclined to help him out too. Thats how it should be. A mentorship not a dictatorship.

Fast forward 4 years- I am now working in the same vicinity/ hospital as the former first year chief and I show her no professional mercy now as an attending. Bump her cases, take her pts, just run train on her and her associates because although we came from same program, my training IMO is vastly superior to hers. An example of how residency is what you make of it, no matter how well structured or how poorly structured it is.
 
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Windom Earle

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For the young physician one the average was about 180K including bonuses. I'm not sure if it showed without bonuses since bonuses are a large part of many physician's pay structures. So anyway I'm not sure that's relevant unless you're planning on having all your future bonuses funneled towards @bobtheweazel which I must say is quite generous of you and so I thank you in advance.

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Two similar sounding questions about this.

1. How young was "young" in this survey? 2 years? 5 years?

2. How large is a "large" part?
 

bobtheweazel

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Two similar sounding questions about this.

1. How young was "young" in this survey? 2 years? 5 years?

2. How large is a "large" part?

1. Everyone in the survey was in practice for 10 years or less.

2. For example a base of 120K and production bonus of 60K wouldn't be unreasonable. So obviously a very significant portion of overall income. Of course the numbers can vary quite a bit but the point is that the payment structure of most pods includes a base salary plus production bonus.

3. I've attached an extra table that seems to have some good info breaking down salary by practice type.
Screenshot_20171115-214445.jpg
Screenshot_20171115-214950.jpg


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Windom Earle

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1. Everyone in the survey was in practice for 10 years or less.

2. For example a base of 120K and production bonus of 60K wouldn't be unreasonable. So obviously a very significant portion of overall income. Of course the numbers can vary quite a bit but the point is that the payment structure of most pods includes a base salary plus production bonus.

3. I've attached an extra table that seems to have some good info breaking down salary by practice type. View attachment 225491 View attachment 225492

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You are the best, Bernie Sanders!
 

GypsyHummus

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When it says 1-5 years out, is that also including pods in residency?


1. Everyone in the survey was in practice for 10 years or less.

2. For example a base of 120K and production bonus of 60K wouldn't be unreasonable. So obviously a very significant portion of overall income. Of course the numbers can vary quite a bit but the point is that the payment structure of most pods includes a base salary plus production bonus.

3. I've attached an extra table that seems to have some good info breaking down salary by practice type. View attachment 225491 View attachment 225492

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bobtheweazel

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No. Residents were excluded for accuracy.

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GypsyHummus

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I wonder if those making under 100k net were working full time (40 hrs+)

Numbers are not unreasonable however.


No. Residents were excluded for accuracy.

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bobtheweazel

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I wonder if those making under 100k net were working full time (40 hrs+)

Numbers are not unreasonable however.
It's possible. The average hours per week for the survey was just barely over 40 hours, which also seems a little on the low side, so perhaps there were a few part timers or something making under 100K and bringing the salary and weekly hours averages down a wee bit. IDK. This survey has like a million tables and I haven't gone through every single one extensively.

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theconzumer

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It's possible. The average hours per week for the survey was just barely over 40 hours, which also seems a little on the low side, so perhaps there were a few part timers or something making under 100K and bringing the salary and weekly hours averages down a wee bit. IDK. This survey has like a million tables and I haven't gone through every single one extensively.

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Curious as to where you found these tables?
 

bobtheweazel

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Curious as to where you found these tables?
That is all from the APMA 2015 Young Physicians' Survey. Podiatry students can become APMA members for free and get access to a lot of resources like that through the APMA website.

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Windom Earle

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I'd be lying if I said I wasn't scared/shocked about how high that <100k number is...
 
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Windom Earle

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The practice type is a huge factor.. Hardly any were below 100k who were employed by a multi specialty clinic or hospital employed.

See that's the thing...

I bet alot of them, if not all, tried really hard to get employed by a hospital or a multi-specialty group but just couldn't land a job with them.

But there's no polls or surveys on that, just my hunch.
 

Cranjis McBasketball

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See that's the thing...

I bet alot of them, if not all, tried really hard to get employed by a hospital or a multi-specialty group but just couldn't land a job with them.

But there's no polls or surveys on that, just my hunch.
Based on?
 

dtrack22

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Windom Earle

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That is all from the APMA 2015 Young Physicians' Survey. Podiatry students can become APMA members for free and get access to a lot of resources like that through the APMA website.

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I can't wait till I can get my free account. Do you have a survey/polls about how many hours pods work? I'd like to see some more data on that
 

bobtheweazel

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I can't wait till I can get my free account. Do you have a survey/polls about how many hours pods work? I'd like to see some more data on that
Yea, there's a decent amount about hours. I'll give you a bit here.

Screen Shot 2017-11-19 at 6.16.12 PM.png


This is from the young physician's survey so I guess you could roughly say that for this group which averaged about 180K, they did that while also averaging about 45 hours per week.

If you look at the overall APMA survey that includes all podiatrists (so adding all the old timers into the mix) then you see the hours per week drop to an average of 40.4 with over 60% of respondents working 40 hours or fewer.
 

Windom Earle

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Yea, there's a decent amount about hours. I'll give you a bit here.

View attachment 225637

This is from the young physician's survey so I guess you could roughly say that for this group which averaged about 180K, they did that while also averaging about 45 hours per week.

If you look at the overall APMA survey that includes all podiatrists (so adding all the old timers into the mix) then you see the hours per week drop to an average of 40.4 with over 60% of respondents working 40 hours or fewer.

So who actually sets these hours? Can I just decide to work 60 hours a week to earn more money?

Also, is there a direct correlation throughout all the salary ranges between working more hours and making more money as a podiatrist? Will someone working 50 hrs a week definitely make more than 40 hours a week? It seems like an obvious question, but I'm a numbers and surveys kind of guy.
 

msuDPM

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Patients seen would be a better correlation to money earned than hours worked. Personally, I spend about 40-45 hours a week directly in patient care with another 10-15 in administrative duties. You can choose to work more hours, but without butts in chairs to see you're unlikely to earn more.
 

Weirdy

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So who actually sets these hours? Can I just decide to work 60 hours a week to earn more money?

Also, is there a direct correlation throughout all the salary ranges between working more hours and making more money as a podiatrist? Will someone working 50 hrs a week definitely make more than 40 hours a week? It seems like an obvious question, but I'm a numbers and surveys kind of guy.

Supply and demand. Location. Population number. Lifestyle.

Who and where would you be able to find to hire you for those 40 extra hours?

Is your location in a large metropolis or a rural area?

How many other DPMs are around you?

What is the population of your area?

Do you have kids you need to take to soccer practice on Saturday mornings or are you a young whipper snapper working 7 days a week?

Numbers and surveys can only tell you so much. Everything else life will throw at you.
 
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