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What kind of paid positions are for PA pre-req?

Discussion in 'Clinicians [ RN / NP / PA ]' started by maisuree, Apr 29, 2007.

  1. maisuree

    maisuree Member

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    Some schools' admission requirements ask for a certain number of hours for paid positions in the health care related field and has to be direct patient contact.

    If I am graduated with a BS, volunteered in the hospitals for a few years but don't have it documented, it means that I have counting the hours all over again? Some schools don't even accept the volunteer hours. So my question is if I never have the real healthcare experience, how can I get the healthcare related jobs? What kind of positions can I get started?

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks in advance.
     
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  3. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc

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    emt-basic 120 hr course
    nursing assistant(cna) 40-80 hr course
    medical assistant 3-12 mo course
    licensed practical nurse(lpn/lvn) 1 yr course
    paramedic 1-2 yr course after emt-basic
    resp. therapist 2 yr course
    rn 2-4 yr course

    any of the above + 6 months/1000 hrs+ on the job and you should be in good shape for most schools. some require 2 yrs + of experience(4000 hrs +)
     
  4. Glorified

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    I suggest being an EMT. The course is really not that hard, however it is time consuming. The main benefit from EMT class is learning how to do a good patient assessment. You also learn splinting, bleeding control, spinal immbolization, airway management, and even how to deliver a baby. I had a great time with mine, and have only less than a week left. It shouldn't be that hard to work or volunteer as an EMT-B while doing undergraduate work too. Good Luck with your career!
     
  5. core0

    core0 Which way is the windmill

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    I'll add CST (Certified Surgical Technologist) One year program. Good if you are thinking of going into surgery.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
     
  6. nyemt2005

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    to add onto that, as a Basic in certain states you'll be able to administer certain medications. For example, in New York State we're allowed to administer Epi, albuterol, and aspirin on standing orders. You can make decent money for being in college (I get paid 12 dollars an hour as a Basic), and you get to really see and learn alot.
     
  7. RAMPA

    RAMPA Pimpiro

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    yup gettin the EMT-B is probably the best option for most who are in college.......unless your "major" is already RN, RT, etc :D
     
  8. maisuree

    maisuree Member

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    I can take an emt-b at any school or it has to be from a certain organization? When I tried to look up on emt...there're only info on the certification, but I don't see about the courses that I can take or applied to?

    Also, is it hard to get the paid emt position? Is the part time position harder to get if I cannot work fulltime?
     
  9. beans&flowers

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    so one can take the emt route while still a full-time student?
     
  10. Glorified

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    yeah, my course was 5 credits and met two nights a week for 4 1/2 hours. It easily fits into a normal schedule if you are willing to take less classes or really study hard that semester. You can take EMT-B class in the summer semester too. Most are at community colleges, so if you go to a traditional university, your best bet is too take a night EMT class.
     
  11. Glorified

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    It depends on your area, and the amount of EMT-B's in that area. You can always volunteer, which counts as experience. Or, you could volunteer to get experience needed to enroll in an EMT-Intermediate program. EMT-I's have an easier time finding employment and the course takes much less time than a paramedic program.
     
  12. Kate6058

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    Are there jobs that will count as patient care hours but that don't require extra schooling? I'm thinking of a career change to a PA and on top of my prerequisite courses, it's a bit stressful to think about taking another set of courses to become certified as a CNA or surgical tech or another of the above listed options. I've volunteered a lot, as I'm also considering medical school, and I guess I feel like I have so much on my plate already that the prospect of having another mini-career during this change is kind of anxiety-provoking. Is anyone else out there in this situation? I don't mean to insinuate that I'm trying to shy away from more patient contact... my mind is just feeling a bit boggled.

    Any advice?
     
  13. core0

    core0 Which way is the windmill

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    You can get an EMT through a evening course. Same for CNA. EMT will let you work ambulance and ER in some states. CNA - hospital obviously. Both of these will let you work evenings if you want to go to school (assuming no other life). You used to be able to get patient care jobs without schooling, but those days are long gone. Other professions (MA or CST for example you are looking at 4-12 months of part time schooling.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
     
  14. emedpa

    emedpa GlobalDoc

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    go to medschool. that is what you have been prepping for and that is what you are best suited for at this point. there are pa programs( 15 of 140) that will take you without any real pt care experience but ( at least in my opinion) this defeats the purpose of attending a pa program which historically has been to build on an already solid foundation of medical knowledge and practice gained through experience in a prior medical career.
     
  15. Kate6058

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    Well, I don't know that I'm best suited for medical school, which is why I'm here seeking advice. I didn't mean to imply that I was looking for a shortcut into becoming a PA; it's just a stressful as a career changer to plan my future path since I'm balancing my job as well... I need all the details I can get.

    Are CNA courses offered by places other than community colleges?
     
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  17. core0

    core0 Which way is the windmill

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    Some hospitals run them. Also so do nursing homes but they usually require a comittment.

    David Carpenter, PA-C
     

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