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What Kind of Research are medical schools looking for. Please Feed Back

Discussion in 'Pre-Medical - MD' started by JClass413, Apr 13, 2007.

  1. JClass413

    JClass413 5+ Year Member

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    I'm wondering what are some of you doing as "Research," to make your chances of getting in to medical school increase. And what are you some of you doing as volunteers? PLease Help.
     
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  3. Tired

    Tired Fading away 7+ Year Member

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    I did lab work in an Inorganic Lab. Most of my friends did work in Cell & Molec labs or Organic labs. I have never heard of a med school that preferred a specific type of research.
     
  4. Anka

    Anka Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    I'm not sure they care, either. I did research in a physiology of various sorts and one cognitive science stint. Clinical research is nice for a med student if you can get a little chart review gig going, because it's easier to get a publication out of it; the problem is, I'm not sure you know enough as an undergrad to be able to abstract a chart.

    I would just cast a wide net, see what kind of opportunities you can get, and then take your best offer -- it works out better for everyone if you commit for 1-2 years (part time during the school year and full time over the summer). If you just do the summer, you spend the entire time getting the techniques down and getting oriented that you never really have a chance to produce anything. If you work part time in the spring before your summer, you get oriented in the spring, crank out the experiments over the summer, then spend the next year analyzing data/writing/doing the revision experiments, etc. By that point, you'll be independent enough that you can do experiments on the weekends or at night when no one else is around to help you. If after a year things aren't going anywhere, switch labs -- and when they hear that you've been working in the same lab for a year rather than doing the typical undergrad thing, they'll often give you a better project than you would have gotten otherwise. The other advice is to get a technical skill of some sort, whether that is programming a computer or doing molecular biology techniques -- it'll help improve your mobility as you progress.

    Best,
    Anka
     
  5. WCGee

    WCGee Super Awesome Person 5+ Year Member

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    I did research in anthropology and a lot of people I know did research in non-science labs.
     
  6. abesogood

    abesogood 2+ Year Member

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    research in a science OR nonscience field that you are passionate about.
     
  7. postbacker

    postbacker Banned Banned

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    Are you in the current app cycle? And if so, have you gotten good vibes on your research in anthro? Did you have any science/medical research to go along with it? Same questions RE your friends - if you know it...

    Thanks...
     
  8. moto_za

    moto_za Member 10+ Year Member

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    Clinical Research is best.
     
  9. moto_za

    moto_za Member 10+ Year Member

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    Can you exaplin that a little more? If you make a chart from articles, you can actually write about it and have it published,etc? thanks
     
  10. TMP-SMX

    TMP-SMX Senior Member Moderator Emeritus 10+ Year Member

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    Medical schools like to see indepdendent research where you follow the scientific method and troubleshoot when something goes wrong. The field doesn't matter.
     
  11. happy snake

    happy snake 2+ Year Member

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    From what I gathered from my interviews, they cared more about why I chose a particular area of research, than anything else. Choose something you are genuinely curious about and start researching. Cheers! :luck:
     
  12. Anka

    Anka Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    You review "charts", i.e., medical records. As an example, lets say I want to look at whether people who recieved pastoral care in the hospital tended to do better. I decide to take patients on the general medical service admitted and discharged over the past year with, say, COPD flare. Then I look through all the charts that have fulfill my entry requirements and see whether or not they received pastoral care, and how they fared on my outcome measures (for the purposes of example, say "days in hospital", "Number of days on a ventilator", "death in hospital"). Most of the work is monkey work, and you can get it done in the evenings (even while on clinical rotations); you usually get some kind of publication out of it, even if it is often one step up from the Ladies Home Journal. So, it's great for medical students. The problem is, I'm not sure as a premed you necessarily know enough to be able to get everything you need to get out of a chart... I dunno. Never tried it as a premed. Totally would have tried, though, if I had gotten a crack at it.

    Hope that helps.

    Best
    Anka
     
  13. moto_za

    moto_za Member 10+ Year Member

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    thanks anka. The reason I ask is b/c I am curently involved in what you have described and to be honest when I am making the charts/article reviews I feel like a dumbo at times b/c extracting info from some of the scientific article is diffucult for me as an undergrad.. But I usually get the help of my pi and he seems cool about it. So do you think what I am doing can be published? thanks for your advice
     
  14. Aynsl156

    Aynsl156 2+ Year Member

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    MDApps:
    I'm doing a chart review right now on surgical outcomes in hypospadias repair. It's worth pursuing if you have someone who's done database stuff to walk you through programming into statistical programs, setting up the case report forms, etc. If you work at a hospital, most of the departments can use more scutmonkeys to make these databases.
     
  15. Institute

    Institute 2+ Year Member

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    Your best bet is to research the school themselves, more specifically the faculty that operates each institution. It might give you an idea of the research they are more involved in.
     
  16. Anka

    Anka Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    Sure. I assume that's why your professor is having you do it... most professors don't do anything that doesn't lead to publication in one way or another. The question is, are you going to be an author? Or, is there any way you can write it up and be first author? Given that you're having a hard time interpreting other people's papers at this point, it might be hard, but you learn an awful lot by writing the paper yourself and, in all but a few circumstances, writing the paper gives you dibs on first authorship. Is anyone else working on the project that has first dibs (post doc, grad student, resident, fellow, med student)?

    Best,
    Anka
     
  17. Winter

    Winter Googleholic 2+ Year Member

    Uh...I was just wondering: Since everyone is only talking about research of the scientific kind, does that mean that med schools won't think much about the English research I took part in last fall?

    I'm an english second major, btw

    My advisor said that they would like it, because it's "shows that I'm well-rounded".

    I have taken part in chem research also, but I was interested in doing some more english research...
     
  18. Anka

    Anka Senior Member 7+ Year Member

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    I did literature, too -- definitly wound up talking more about my literature research than the science research I did during interviews... just do what you're interested in. Especially if you've already done some science.

    Anka
     
  19. samgeez

    samgeez 2+ Year Member

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    Feb 5, 2007
    Do translational research (you will look good just by knowing what it is). Also, do a project that has the potential for a lot of publications.
     

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