Aug 11, 2016
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So lately I've been spending some time researching different majors related to the medical field. However, I enjoy studying environmental sciences and know that I want to become a doctor. I'm currently in the process of applying to college (undergrad) and was wondering if majoring in environmental health would be helpful for med school?
 

darkjedi

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Doesn't matter, as long as you can excel in it and get the best GPA possible. It can be completely unrelated to medicine or even the sciences altitude altogether.
 

summergirl

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I can see all majors being helpful before med. Bio majors have a leg up on the MCAT. Music majors have a diversity essay that writes itself.
 

tessellations

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If you enjoy environmental science, go with that! Major in something you excel at and enjoy.
 
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gonnif

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bio majors preform the worst on the mcat by aamc data
Not an accurate statement

https://www.aamc.org/download/321496/data/factstablea17.pdf
https://www.aamc.org/download/321496/data/factstablea17.pdf
Mean Applicant MCAT for Bio Majors was same as Social Science Majors at 28.2 (old scores). These were both beaten by Humanity major at 29.4. Counterintuitively,
specialized health majors, who many students incorrectly will be good preparation for medical school, have the lowest MCAT score for applicants at 25.8. They also have the lowest score for matriculants at 30.1, followed closely by Biological Science majors and "other" tied at 31.2.

As long as the OP doesnt major in party and minor in frat, they major in whatever
 
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Whatever makes you happy. I know EE majors who have gotten 42's, bio majors who have gotten 26's, bio majors who have gotten 34's and any combo you want.
 

FutureOncologist

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I was a biochemistry major, pretty much just to "impress" adcoms and "do the best on the MCAT" (I mean, it is biology and chemistry... two parts of the MCAT!) I'm going to let you know that, with 1 semester of general biochem and 1 semester of physiological biochem (Biochemistry II with lab,) it didn't do anything for me in medical school. What I covered in 2 semesters in undergrad, I covered in about 2 months in medical school.

Major in swimming for all anyone cares. Make the GPA, get the MCAT, and round yourself out in healthcare volunteering, shadowing, and any hobbies you're interested in.
 
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Engineering is a pretty baller major, especially chemical engineering. If you can do well in chemical engineering, you can do anything academic you put your mind to. Major teaches you how to think.
 
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Sep 24, 2015
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Do something you really like and may not get the chance to immerse yourself in later. You are going to get to study medicine/science for the rest of your life. I ended up doing my UG in biochemistry because I am a non-trad student who wanted to get done with undergrad ASAP and it had everything I needed. If I were 18 and just starting college, I would have picked something like history, literature, or another humanities topic. I think that having a strong foundation of knowledge in the "human condition" and being able to communicate with people effectively is suuuuuper important and makes you less one-dimensional. Don't live your life for the MCAT.
 
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numbersloth

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I was recently shadowing an ER Physician. I told her that I was struggling with choosing a major (Psych? Neuro? Anthropology? Philosophy?). She turned to me and told me, very seriously, that she majored in biochemistry and it is her one biggest regret. If she could do it all over again, she would major in Religion and Art. "You have a lifetime of medicine and biomedical sciences ahead of you, do something crazy now." Obviously, if you want to get an MD/PhD, you should probably double in a science and get tons of research, but otherwise, just do whatever sounds baller. Also enjoy the fact that you can major in completely unemployable majors and it doesn't matter.
 

RangerBob

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I majored in art--I don't regret it at all. Gave a lot of interesting topics to discuss at the interview as well. My only regret was not taking more religious studies courses to get a double-major, though I didn't take the intro courses/develop an interest until senior year, so there wasn't a whole lot I could do about it at that point. Guess that's what lifelong learning is for, right?

Like the others say, major in something that really interests you, whether it's bio or anthropology. Ideally that major is also something that you'd want to do if you don't get into medical school (or if you change your mind).
 
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studentdocftw

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The major you are most interested in/able to succeed in. FWIW, I kind of regret majoring in Biochemistry and wish I had done Business/Finance. Don't get me wrong, I will definitely have a leg-up on some students in my classes from a biochemical perspective, but I'd argue Business/Finance has lifelong utility, while a good amount of Biochem you learn in undergrad is not used as much in medical school. I'd imagine if you score well on the Bio section of the MCAT, you would be fairly prepared for 1st year, which you could do from just studying with a prep company.
 

7331poas

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Not an accurate statement

https://www.aamc.org/download/321496/data/factstablea17.pdf
Mean Applicant MCAT for Bio Majors was same as Social Science Majors at 28.2 (old scores). These were both beaten by Humanity major at 29.4. Counterintuitively,
specialized health majors, who many students incorrectly will be good preparation for medical school, have the lowest MCAT score for applicants at 25.8. They also have the lowest score for matriculants at 30.1, followed closely by Biological Science majors and "other" tied at 31.2.

As long as the OP doesnt major in party and minor in frat, they major in whatever

Sorry my mistake. Bio majors are below average performers on the MCAT. Either way the original statement is misleading.
 

brigaton

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I also think you should consider what if the med route doesn't turn out? What if you don't do that well on the MCAT or you realize in college that being a doctor isn't for you? You'll want to graduate with a major in a field that you'd actually enjoy working in. I don't think majoring in some basket-weaving major would be wise if medicine didn't turn out because then what would you do? Go back to school and get another major? There are a lot of high school students who think they want to be a doctor. A very small percentage of them actually end up becoming one. It's easy to say in hindsight I wish I would have majored in religion and the arts when you're already a doctor. But would that individual be okay with her choice of major if medicine didn't end up turning out?
 

Dagrimsta1

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I was a bio major. I thought it helped with sciences and taught me how to think in a scientific manner...
 

tessellations

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I'm a biochemistry major with a love hate relationship with my major. My major has afforded me a lot of opportunities and I've excelled in it, but it's science all the time, which can be a lot. If I could go back I'd probably major in Public Health and minor in biochemistry. The amount of fairly useless lab classes I have to take...But, I do appreciate its convenience, and I do love learning about proteins. Honestly, a lot of majors have pros and cons, so I'm not particularly regretful.

I've always thought Environmental Science was really cool. In another life I'd probably want to become an Environmental Toxicologist and work for the EPA :laugh:
 

numbersloth

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I'm a biochemistry major with a love hate relationship with my major. My major has afforded me a lot of opportunities and I've excelled in it, but it's science all the time, which can be a lot. If I could go back I'd probably major in Public Health and minor in biochemistry. The amount of fairly useless lab classes I have to take...But, I do appreciate its convenience, and I do love learning about proteins. Honestly, a lot of majors have pros and cons, so I'm not particularly regretful.

I've always thought Environmental Science was really cool. In another life I'd probably want to become an Environmental Toxicologist and work for the EPA :laugh:
Well good news is that is MD doesn't work out any environmental toxicology programs at public health schools would be happy to take on a biochemistry major.
 
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tessellations

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Well good news is that is MD doesn't work out any environmental toxicology programs at public health schools would be happy to take on a biochemistry major.
True! At this point in time, an Environmental Toxicology PhD is my back up plan (or maybe an Epi/Public Health degree). You have me figured out ;)
 

Strider_91

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bio majors preform the worst on the mcat by aamc data

That's a skewed statistic because the bio majors have the largest n so Ofcourse their average will be closer to the overall average whereas the physics and engineering people have the smaller n and usually someone majoring in something not medicine related but pursuing med school is extra driven.
 

Ho0v-man

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I majored in psych because those classes were most readily available schedule-wise so I could get done faster. At my undergrad, you could take them in any order instead of doing sequences like you would for the "hard sciences." My degree did not help on the psych portion of the MCAT.

If I had a choice, I would have picked physical chemistry but it would have taken me another year and a half to finish.


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TheBiologist

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doesn't matter if you are biology or political science (as long as you get your pre-reqs). med schools like diverse interests

the only thing i can think of is that certain majors seem to do better on the MCAT - BME being the highest I believe, next to Physics, EE, Econ (yup) then Neuroscience.

but whether those majors actually better prepare you for the mcat or it's just that smarter people apply for those majors is another question.....
 

Technology

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I recommend puppetry, Canadian studies, bowling management, and cannabis cultivation.
 
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I would think Biochemistry would be the most useful for preparing for a well defined science background but depending on the school, it might not be worth it due to taking a hit on your GPA which is more important. I am doing Biochemistry with a liberal arts degree (essentially a double major considering how much humanities I have to do) and I feel like I'm being killed and my grades took a hit due to how much work I have. I would just do a major you enjoy and do well in the pre-reqs.
 

gonnif

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I recommend puppetry, Canadian studies, bowling management, and cannabis cultivation.
There was someone a while back who had a degree in brewing I believe
 

kopftonmd

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Major in music! Then you'll learn what an ursatz is!
 

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When you get to medical school and learn that many disorders are multifactorial, and have strong environmental factors, environmental science may actually give you a leg up. Absolutely no major will completely prepare you for the material, something I'm being rudely reminded of daily. Lol, now back to studying for me.
 
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coninuteremedia

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So lately I've been spending some time researching different majors related to the medical field. However, I enjoy studying environmental sciences and know that I want to become a doctor. I'm currently in the process of applying to college (undergrad) and was wondering if majoring in environmental health would be helpful for med school?
Physiology and neuroscience.

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Engineering is a pretty baller major, especially chemical engineering. If you can do well in chemical engineering, you can do anything academic you put your mind to. Major teaches you how to think.
+1

Coming from a chemical engineering major, I couldn't agree more.