Medical What topic should I write on for diversity question for medical school supplementary application?

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esob

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Hello expert team of student doctor network, I previously asked for some assistance with my application topics and was advised to rethink my diversity essay topic. I have thought of some other qualities I possess that are less focused on my ethnicity. If you could let me know what you think I would appreciate it.

Diversity
1. Throughout my life I have become adept at creating comfortable social settings with others, allowing me to establish an effective rapport with most of the people I meet. Consequently, this has helped me create a productive environment in professional settings such as in the laboratory I work in and hospice I volunteer at. Moreover, this has allowed others to confide in me and has helped me navigate some otherwise uncomfortable scenarios involving more serious topics.

2. I have interests and am actively participating in the integration of healthcare and technology, specifically through computational research. I do not have a degree in computer science, however, I have put in a lot of effort to become fluent in a few programming languages that has allowed me to create fruitful research endeavors. Outside of the laboratory I am acquainting myself with more specialized topics such as deep learning and how to integrate it with healthcare such as aiding/improving radiological diagnoses. (not sure if this is important, but the majority of my applications are for physician-scientist programs)

3. I like to learn how to do new things, even if they aren't relevant to my career. A couple examples, I taught myself the basics of woodworking and incorporated it with some basic electronics to create a box held together by dovetail joints that uses a push button to control a servomotor to dispense index cards; I learned the basics of sewing and made some small stuffed animals for some friends (I applied this to one of my volunteering opportunities, albeit the transition wasn't as smooth as I thought it would be and I kept stabbing myself)

If anyone could provide some feedback on these topics I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much!
I would suggest focusing on #2. COVID has shown that technology is more important in the delivery of healthcare than ever before. Items #1 (being personable) and #3 (essentially being a life-long learner) are traits that are expected of every medical student. Not every student, however, will have the skill or passion for tech. I would expand idea #2 by noting 3 specific topics, with a focus on a quick explanation of what it is, how you believe it will impact healthcare, and what your specific skill set is for that topic. As an example, I wrote about the use of blockchain technology in the secure delivery of EHR. I had at least a couple of different interviewers ask me more in-depth questions about the topic.
 

tantacles

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1 and 3 aren't really all that special in terms of diversity. I also don't think #2 is great, but it's closer. Sorry to poo poo a lot of your ideas. I'm seeing a lot there that makes you want me at my medical school, but not a lot that makes me think you'll add to the diversity of medical school. That being said, I hate this prompt, and I'm sorry you need to suffer through it.
 
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Goro

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Hello again expert team of student doctor network, hopefully this is the last time I bother you for assistance. I have brain stormed a couple more topics and would appreciate your opinions if you have the time.

1. I've always loved to make/build things. I probably started like many others with LEGO, but I branched out to other things, mostly computers and personal fireworks and ignition system. Both involved intense focus. If I wasn't paying attention when building computers I could fry my motherboard which would cost another $50-$200 that I couldn't afford, while not paying attention when making fireworks could cost me a hand. Specifically making fireworks taught me a lot, briefly:
a) You need to have a wide breadth of knowledge and be cognizant of the fine details of the entire process. Of course this includes making the firework itself, but importantly this includes the laws around the process. There are some minutiae that some might ignore such as the color/size of the mortar tubing, however, not abiding by the law could cause some serious danger to others or legal suspicions if authorities were ever to come around.
b) I learned to respect both the process and the wishes of others even if I perceived them as detrimental. A previous partner of mine as well as my family voiced their concerns around the safety of my hobby and I was fairly adamant that everything would be safe. Although initially disheartened by having to limit myself, I understood where they were coming from. Accounting for their concerns would bring peace of mind to them as well as preserving the relationships we held which was/is much more important to me.
c) I learned how to be more creative and see things as more than how they appear (improvise). (Example: I didn't have a screwdriver on hand when I was making a box, I was lazy and instead used the filer on a nail clipper)
d) Most importantly, I learned to always take responsibility not only for my own well-being but for those around me when tinkering with potentially dangerous things. Luckily I did not have to learn this from firsthand experience; when I was more naive and getting carried away with this hobby my grandfather put the fear of god in me by telling me how he used to make fireworks with a friend and that one day that friend got careless and leveled his (the friend's) house, killing him and his entire family. I thought he was just trying to scare me but found an article that detailed the process and have been operating with EXTREME caution ever since.

I think I've used a lot of similar skills throughout my research career and palliative care volunteering.

2. I played trumpet for ~6 years (this included jazz ensembles and marching bands) throughout which I also learned a bit of piano & alto saxophone. Playing as part of a band taught me the importance of working as a team to create something more beautiful than something the individual could make (even solos are a team effort). There was also a lot of discipline and humility throughout learning songs. Learning to play a song was difficult especially if the band wanted to sound good. It required tens to hundreds of attempts. Humility was especially important when communicating with the director and staying in line with your designated part (there is a stereotype, that I will neither confirm nor deny, that depicts trumpet players as cocky and liking to show off, playing into this mentality would certainly spoil the soup as one would like to standout when they are supposed to blend in).

Again, thank you all for your feedback, please let me know if any of these are acceptable. If neither are, I might just stick with writing on my goals and current efforts towards integrating technology and medicine. I'm personally a bit skeptical for #2, playing an instrument or in a band seems to be fairly common, let me know what you think!
2 > 1
 

TheBoneDoctah

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On your latest post...I would use the second one if this is the best you have. I still don’t think it’s great though and feel as though you are reaching to find diversity on these examples.

If you do end up getting into medical school and apply for orthopedic surgery, they would love the building stuff thing. Haha.
 

Goro

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Thank you for your feedback again Goro, I was wondering if I could get your opinion on whether to write about playing the trumpet in a band or integrating my interests in technology and medicine? Thank you again.
1 is more whoopeedoo for me. Lots of people like computers and tech.

It takes talent and discipline to play an instrument.
 
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