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sixpence

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so at my univ. we have biochem 1 and 2. 1 covers dna and proteins/enzymes. 2 covers metabolic pathways, energy regulation, anabolic regulation, not too sure what else
well anyway this crazy guy says there's no point in taking 1 and suggests skipping to 2 bc 1's material is not covered in med school. so can anyone say what is covered in med school. i'm guessing its probably everything...
 

psipsina

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the dna stuff is definitely covered rather quickly in biochem but it pretty heavily represented on the USMLE step 1 so it could serve you to have studied it in depth in the long run.
 

EpiPEN

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Allow me to show you the biochem syllabus from my school. This was taught in concurrent with cell bio and immunology. All in 10 weeks.


Lecture # Biochemistry in Health and Disease Topics Lecturer I. Digestion and Storage of Glucose 1 Introduction to Metabolism and Carbohydrates Taylor 2 Glycogen: Storage and Mobilization of Glucose Taylor II. Regulation of Glycogen Metabolism 3 Regulation of Glycogen Metabolism I: Signal Transduction Taylor 4 Regulation of Glycogen Metabolism II: Protein Phosphorylation Taylor III. Catabolism of Glucose 5 Bioenergetics and ATP Taylor 6 Anaerobic Catabolism of Glucose: Glucolysis and Fermentation Taylor 7 Aerobic Catabolism of Glucose Taylor 8 Regulation and Diseases of Carbohydrate Metabolism Taylor 9 Pentose Phosphate Shunt Taylor IV. Amino Acid Catabolism 10 Degradation of Amino Acids / Urea Cycle Taylor V. Synthesis and Oxidation of Fatty Acids 11 Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Dennis 12 Fatty Acid Oxidation Dennis 13 Nutrition, Ketones and Essential Fatty Acids Dennis VI. Synthesis of ATP in Mitochondria and Diseases 14 Cytochromes and Proton Gradients Dennis 15 ATP Synthesis and Mitochondrial Disease Dennis Conference — September 19, 2008, 2:00-3:00 PM Exam I — September 22, 2008, 9:00-11:00 am (Lectures 1-15, 30% of grade) 16 Clinical Correlates — Mitochondrial Disease VII. Integration of Metabolism in Tissues 17 Gluconeogenesis Taylor 18 Metabolism in Muscle Taylor VIII. Amino Acids, Proteins and Enzymes 19 Amino Acids and Proteins Dorrestein 20 Enzyme Kinetics and Inhibition Dorrestein 21 Enzyme Mechanism and Catalysis Dorrestein IX. Complex Lipid Metabolism 22 Prostaglandins, Aspirin, and Inflammatory Diseases Dennis 23 Biosynthesis and Inhibition of Cholesterol and Steroids Dennis 24 Lipoprotein Structure Dennis 25 Lipoprotein Receptors and Atherosclerosis Dennis 26 Nutrition and Fat Digestion Dennis 27 Membrane and Neutral Lipid Biosynthesis Dennis 28 Membrane Phospholipid Dennis 29 Sphingolipid Diseases Dennis X. Vitamins and Nutrition 30 Nutrition and Vitamins (Water Soluble) Dennis 31 Clinical Correlates — Atherosclerosis Dennis 32 Nutrition and Vitamins (Fat Soluble Vitamins) Dennis XI. Adaptations to Metabolic Stress and Disease 33 Metabolism in the Well-Fed State Taylor 34 Adaptations to Starvation Taylor 35 Adaptations to Diabetes Taylor 36 Exercise, Nutrition and AMP Kinase Guan Conference — October 17, 2008, 2:00-3:00 PM Exam II — October 20, 2008, 9:00-11:00 am (Lectures 16-36, 35% of grade) XII. Nucleic Acid Metabolism 37 Clinical Correlates — Diabetes Taylor 38 Nucleotides and Nucleic Acid, Purines Dennis 39 Pyrimidines Dennis 40 RNA to DNA Dennis 41 Cancer Chemotherapy, AIDS and Gout Dennis XIII. Diseases of Protein Structure and Aggregation 42 Protein Folding and Quality Control Guan 43 Protein Misfolding and Disease Guan 44 Metabolic Adaptations in Cancer Guan XIV. Blood Proteins and Function 45 Oxygen Transport Dorrestein 46 Regulation of Bleeding and Thrombosis Dorrestein 47 Blood Borne Diseases and Drug Design Dorrestein XV. Heme Metabolism 48 Heme Biosynthesis and Degradation Taylor 49 Heme Degradation and Jaundice Taylor 50 Amino Acid Biosynthesis and Pernicious Anemia Taylor XVI. Pathogenic Proteins 51 Bacterial Cell Walls and Antibiotics Dorrestein 52 Protein Delivery of Bacterial Toxins Dorrestein XVII. Biochemistry of the Eye 53 Vision and Color Blindness Taylor 54 Degenerative Diseases of the Eye Zhang Conference — October 31, 2008, 1:00-2:00 PM Final Exam — November 13, 2008, 9-11am (Lectures 37-54, 35% of grade)
 
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sixpence

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haha 10 weeks...
that was helpful though, i think i will take the next semester of it.
 

Jolie South

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Biochem in med school includes everything you could ever imagine about biochemistry and more.

yea, but i think the focus is different. at my school, we're not concerned about molecular mechanisms and knowing that this carbon does this, etc. While we do have to know trends, we're not going to have to draw electron pushing diagrams for all the reactions like I did in undergrad.

Taking biochem in undergrad is probably helpful but doesn't cover the over-arching "big picture" stuff that's important now.
 
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yea, but i think the focus is different. at my school, we're not concerned about molecular mechanisms and knowing that this carbon does this, etc. While we do have to know trends, we're not going to have to draw electron pushing diagrams for all the reactions like I did in undergrad.

Taking biochem in undergrad is probably helpful but doesn't cover the over-arching "big picture" stuff that's important now.



Agreed. I didn't take biochem in undergrad, and thought I'd be at a disadvantage. I spent maybe the first two days scrambling to make sure I had stuff like Amino Acids down, and fortunately my undergrad taught the hell out of gen chem concepts like enzyme kinetics and pH (two things we did in the beginning of biochem here) so I was fine there. We just had our first exam and I did fine, and looking at how things are playing out I don't think I'm at a disadvantage . . . the advantage might come in being more familiar with the framework and language (which really is borrowed from organic chemistry anyway), but like JS said the "big picture" is stressed much more in medical school.
 
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