What undergraduate degree best increases the chance of acceptance into DS?

miamorcita2008

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Hello!

I am a freshman in college and I am thinking in get a Bachelors Degree in Human Nutrition and then apply to Dental School, should I do this or major in something else such as Biology or Biochemistry?
Thank you very much for your help!!
:confused:
 

DDSelin2mori

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Hello!

I am a freshman in college and I am thinking in get a Bachelors Degree in Human Nutrition and then apply to Dental School, should I do this or major in something else such as Biology or Biochemistry?
Thank you very much for your help!!
:confused:
As far as I know major doesn't matter. Just your GPA is very important
 

fillmein05

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Hello!

I am a freshman in college and I am thinking in get a Bachelors Degree in Human Nutrition and then apply to Dental School, should I do this or major in something else such as Biology or Biochemistry?
Thank you very much for your help!!
:confused:





Yeah, it doesn't matter at all these days. Actually, some schools even like to see a diverse range of majors from applicants and not just all bio/chem. Do something you like, and just take all the pre-reqs.
 

tamkhan

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Most applicants have degrees that allow them to take several courses in biology and related subjects. Obviously, you want a strong science background, if not for application purposes, then simply for your own good when you enter dental school.

Do what you're comfortable with. I would suggest that you do a major in a bio field, and another major in a concentration of your choice.
 
N

nwdmd

Nutrition sounds great!
It interests you, and you will still have research opportunities.

I wouldn't suggest biochem for a pre-dental path, at my university it is a 128 credit major (to put it into perspective: poli. sci. is a 42 credit major).
Basically your whole college career is planned out, full science courseload every term, no flexibility.

The biochem majors I know are either interested in biochem grad studies, or impressing med/dental admissions officers.

From what I've seen, I wouldn't suggest coming into college with the idea of picking your major/classes with the intention of impressing admissions officers.

You probably won't have your heart in the classes, your gpa will suffer, and it may limit your activities outside of academia (i.e. fun, friends, shadowing, research).

***However, I think it's important to prove to yourself that if necessary, you can handle a tough courseload, similar to what you'll experience in dental school.
 

LIDOPAIN

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I agree with everything said. Do something that will be less difficult to maintain the highest possible GPA. Human Nutrition requires almost all the prereqs, at least at my university. I'm a bio major but wish I would have gotten my degree in Japanese or business. A friend of mine sacrificed his GPA for a biochem major.... stupid choice, at the end of the day, your GPA carries more weight than the degree.
 

rkamsterdam

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according to a survey done by the adea in 2004, engineering majors by far have the greatest matriculation rate at 66.3%. Next are business (55.6%), languages/humanties/arts (54.1%), and social sciences (54.1%).

Surprisingly bio and chem majors are below half at 49.9% and 49.4% respectively.

see survey @ http://www.adea.org/Resources/OG/OG_2_HowToApply.pdf
 

SHC1984

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What your major is will not help increase your chances...however a HIGH DAT score will!;) Good Luck!
 

doc3232

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according to a survey done by the adea in 2004, engineering majors by far have the greatest matriculation rate at 66.3%. Next are business (55.6%), languages/humanties/arts (54.1%), and social sciences (54.1%).

Surprisingly bio and chem majors are below half at 49.9% and 49.4% respectively.

see survey @ http://www.adea.org/Resources/OG/OG_2_HowToApply.pdf
This is biased, how many engineer majors applied to D-school, like 10 total?
 

gijohn529

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Pick a major that's easy, maintain a good GPA and do super well on your science courses... you'll be fine. Make sure you do well on your DAT's too.

Interviewers might ask you why you didn't do bio and they might question your capability to learn harder science stuff... so be prepared for that.
 

doc toothache

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DentDelOriente

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Just major in something that you actually care about, not just something easy to get high GPA. That's a waste of 4 years. If you really care about what you're studying, your GPA will show. But don't sign up for Linear Algebra is you can't add.

Nowadays, any major can get you into dental school. If you are doing the sciences, you definitely need research experience to set yourself apart from the rest of the group. Business majors (usually better at interviews) and architecture/engineer (perceived to have better perceptual ability) track usually do really well.

The DAT eventually is the key, since people on the admission committee use it to normalize all applicants.

In order of priorities (depending on school): DAT & GPA get you the interview. It's the interview that gets you the rejection. Good luck with your studies.
 

rkamsterdam

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This is biased, how many engineer majors applied to D-school, like 10 total?
these are stats published by the ADEA. I'm not sure what you mean by biased. even though I think there were many more than ten engineering majors matriculating into dental school, the total amount is immaterial and such a high percentage is nonetheless significant. Perhaps, engineering coursework better prepares students for the DAT, perhaps adcoms look favorably on these students because of their majors , this is speculation and you can interpret the numbers however you like but engineers still somehow have shown significantly greater success in the app. cycle. (btw I'm a business major)
 

Arashi83

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I definitely agree with most posters. Major doesn't matter so much as everything as a whole. Your major is just one facet of your application. It along with extra-curriculars, GPA, DAT, etc. describe you as an applicant. Choose a major that fits you, and the type of person you are. You want the admissions committee to get a good sense of what type of applicant you are, and you major is just a part of that.

My one suggestion on major choice (and I'm partial because my major was in the college of Business) is to get a major that will teach you a little business. Running a dental office is a lot like running a small business. That said, it depends on how into it you want to get. I loved my major, had a good college experience while I got my stuff done, and now have a good idea on what type of a dental office I want to run when I graduate dental school. Whatever major you choose, do well, and good luck!:thumbup: