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What would you guys do?

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Presen

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I was wondering which would you guys pick in this situation.

Would you go to a decent in state MD school. Average price, you're a resident so slightly cheaper, about $50k a semester

Or would you go to a brand new DO school, but you don't have to pay anything since first class is fully funded.
 

eggs13

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I was wondering which would you guys pick in this situation.

Would you go to a decent in state MD school. Average price, you're a resident so slightly cheaper, about $50k a semester

Or would you go to a brand new DO school, but you don't have to pay anything since first class is fully funded.
$50K a semester?

Assuming you mean $50K for the year, I would go MD...MD state school is established plus there is already an "argument" against DO schools (whether it is warranted or not) and the fact that it is brand new means there will be inherent issues/kinks to be worked out
 

Fivo

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Would rather graduate with average debt from an MD school than go to a DO school for free.
 

virtuoso735

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Problem with new DO schools is that they may not have their clinical rotations in place. I would worry most about that. Even some established DO schools have trouble with rotations (not all of them of course), so I would imagine that a new DO would have that problem magnified. The state MD school should have its act together, and you won't have extra hoops to jump through should you decide to pursue a competitive specialty.
 

felix2929

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what DO school is offering this? of all of the DO schools i have never heard of any doing this for its first year class
 
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Jloyay

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YOLO, money isn't an issue


I second this. Once you graduate, you're going to to be making $40,000 a year anyways as a resident for 5 years and after that, average $200.000 salary. $300,000 in debt is pretty reasonable for something as prestigious as medicine that you will do for the rest of your life.

That's like an average joe making about $40,000 funding a new car.
 

Poetic Silence

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MD, no doubt. Now, if it was an established state DO program and a brand new MD program I might see why someone would have trouble choosing. But this one's easy. MD it.
 

JoeM

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I second this. Once you graduate, you're going to to be making $40,000 a year anyways as a resident for 5 years and after that, average $200.000 salary. $300,000 in debt is pretty reasonable for something as prestigious as medicine that you will do for the rest of your life.

That's like an average joe making about $40,000 funding a new car.

I once heard a great piece of advice about taking out loans: you should try to limit the amount of money you take out to the equivalent of one year's salary once you're out of school (in the case if med school, don't include residency).

That said, I think I would go with the MD, mostly because it's well established. Having the opportunity to graduate with 0 debt is tempting. But, chances are you will be able to get out with less debt than a year's salary when you're done if you go with the MD state school.
 

Praefectus

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YOLO, money isn't an issue

tumblr_mc0eg0Vt7m1re3xqwo1_500.gif


Would rather graduate with average debt from an MD school than go to a DO school for free.

+1
 
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Anathema

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YOLO, money isn't an issue

Too true. Not enough people highlight the fact that medicine does bring in money around here. Money should never be an issue for you if you end up being accepted (just don't commit any major crimes or fail out). Just go with what you really want and pay off the debt later when you can.
 

circulus vitios

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I second this. Once you graduate, you're going to to be making $40,000 a year anyways as a resident for 5 years and after that, average $200.000 salary. $300,000 in debt is pretty reasonable for something as prestigious as medicine that you will do for the rest of your life.

That's like an average joe making about $40,000 funding a new car.

You people are so far removed from reality, it's hilarious.

$200k is about $130k take home depending on where you live, or about $11k a month. Grad PLUS loans are fixed at 7.9%. Let's say you do a 3 year residency and you don't make payments on your loans because money is going to be tight during residency. Assuming the loans compound annual -- which they don't, they compound several times daily, if I remember correctly -- that $300k turns into $376k at the end of your residency. To pay off interest alone on $300k at 7.9%, you need to pay nearly $2000 a month. As a senior resident you might pull down $55k a year or somewhere around $3500 a month after taxes. Your balance is going to grow to a maximum of $376k, probably more because interest is compounded more than annually, unless you live on literally $1500 a month.

Let's split $300k and $376k down the middle and assume your post-residency balance is $340k.

10 years: $4100/mo, $492k cumulative payments.
20 years: $2800/mo, $677k cumulative payments.
30 years: $2400/mo, $888k cumulative payments.
IBR: Depends on marital status, family size, state of residence, etc, but around $2400/mo for 25 years or until they are paid off, assuming IBR still exists in 25 years. The calculations are a little complex but I believe you will be making these payments for 25 years due to compounding interest. Cumulative payments will amount to $720k. If you work for a qualifying organization for 10 years and meet other criteria, you may be eligible for loan forgiveness.

Now figure in a longer residency program, or a higher loan balance, or an interest rate hike, or maybe even the discontinuation of income based repayment. It's not trivial or reasonable, and stupid intangibles like prestige have no bearing on financial obligations.
 

ComfortCreature

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It's probably just my age showing, but I wish I wouldn't see future physicians seriously using "YOLO" in a sentence.

Also, I second eggs13. I'd like to know what I'm in for.
 

Fivo

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it's probably just my age showing, but i wish i wouldn't see future physicians seriously using "yolo" in a sentence.

Also, i second eggs13. I'd like to know what i'm in for.

wat?

YOLO
 

911 Turbo

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It's probably just my age showing, but I wish I wouldn't see future physicians seriously using "YOLO" in a sentence.

Also, I second eggs13. I'd like to know what I'm in for.

Yeah, anyone who had ever said YOLO will make a terrible doctor.


I'd take the MD
 

Wymskis

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Problem with new DO schools is that they may not have their clinical rotations in place. I would worry most about that. Even some established DO schools have trouble with rotations (not all of them of course), so I would imagine that a new DO would have that problem magnified.

This. Established schools usually are well known in the area and have established clinical rotations at area hospitals (and a lot of times at their very own hospital). A brand new school may not be affiliated with its own hospital or have anywhere to send their third and fourth years yet.

Plus I don't know if I've ever heard of any DO schools being affiliated directly with a hospital like so many MD schools are.
 

Presen

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Well.... without giving it away... which this probably will...

The DO school says it already has several rotation sites already set up. It's also built next to a medical center as well... They really seem on top of their game which is why I'm having trouble deciding.
 

Poetic Silence

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Well.... without giving it away... which this probably will...

The DO school says it already has several rotation sites already set up. It's also built next to a medical center as well... They really seem on top of their game which is why I'm having trouble deciding.

Western COMP?
 

aurora90

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I would rather have the debt and an MD than go to a DO school for free.
 

Wymskis

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Well.... without giving it away... which this probably will...

The DO school says it already has several rotation sites already set up. It's also built next to a medical center as well... They really seem on top of their game which is why I'm having trouble deciding.

Then hey if you are gonna get the training that you need then its more up to whether or not you like the school. 50k a year is a TON of money and free is awesome.

Also you might want to consider the military scholarships. They get you free school too.

Good luck!
 
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