icristi58

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I am an Anesthesiologist graduated from a US residency training program, EU and US Citizen, medical school degree from the EU. Contemplating to move from the US after working in private practice for about 6 years do to personal reasons. Where in the world would be my US training recognized without to much hassle? I would prefer Europe but very open minded. I do have a family with two little kids. I am fluent in english, german and romanian. Thank you for your input.
 

shreypete

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Australia/NZ might be your best bet.

Regarding Europe, most countries might only give you an exemption from their residency program (usually 1 year max), so you still have to technically redo the entire program.

I'm not so sure about the UK.
 

icristi58

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Thank you Shreypete for your reply. Do you recommend any links/websites with pertinent information regarding Australia's application process, and what do you think about US vs Australia's health care system, reimbursement and lifestyle (if you know of course)? I was looking into moving to Sweden and was ready to contact some recruiters but having to redo the training is not so appealing anymore. How about Canada, if you have any info? Thanks again for taking your time to reply, I really appreciate it.
 

shreypete

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You're welcome. Regarding Sweden, if you really want to go there, then you should give it a shot by all means. But I know that they usually only give an exemption of 1-2 years max. for non-EU medical residents. But again, there's no harm in trying if that's where you want to go. There are always exceptions...and if you're fluent in Swedish, then that's a huge advantage.

I'm sure Canada might be a "open" to accepting American medical residents. But again, you do have to check as they're tightening up the rules.

Australia (including Tasmania) loves post-graduates in the medical field (it's not the same for medical graduates) and you will definitely have a good chance considering the fact that they have a huge shortage of doctors/nurses. But they usually assign foreign medical graduates/residents to rural areas which might (or might not) be a negative depending on your perspective. I'm sure once you've worked in a rural area for some time, you can try and perhaps shift to a city. You can try and check out the following links:

http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/medical-practitioners/doctors.htm
http://www.doctorconnect.gov.au/
http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/medical-practitioners/
http://www.amc-exam.com/doctor-jobs-australia.html
http://www.work-doctor-australia.com/

The salaries really differ from region/province/state to state, so you really have to call and ask them (once you're offered a position). Also the medical requirements differ from state to state, so you have to apply individually for each state. The salaries are usually quite good (they're lower in New Zealand) and you can have quite a good life there (if you're the person who likes heat and beaches.) Locum doctors usually earn higher salaries than the normal doctors (a locum doctor is one who has a temporary job at a medical hospital/clinic and has temporary contracts; upon completion of the contract, he/she can choose another hospital in other area and sign up for another contract.) Also it's a lot easier for doctors to obtain their permanent residency and citizenship in Australia (as they would come under the highly skilled migrant category).

New Zealand as I mentioned is also friendly to post-graduate doctors (and medical residents) but they do offer lower salaries than they offer in Australia, which is why many doctors from NZ are migrating to Australia. But there have been talks of increasing the salaries in NZ to attract more doctors from the world and to prevent their own doctors from migrating to Australia.

Another option would be the Middle-east where they pay excellent salaries and offer very good working conditions, but I'm not too aware of this route (also you have to get used to the extreme heat and the huge culture shock you're going to have.)

Good luck!
 

icristi58

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Thank you very much for the detailed answers Shreypete. Tough decision ahead...
 

shreypete

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Indeed, quite a tough decision.

Good luck and I hope you choose what suits you the best!
 
Oct 31, 2009
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If you have worked as an attending for 6 years, you will have no trouble getting it recognised. AFAIK, they will typically expect you to have worked at attending level for 3 years minimum to get on an UEMS specialist register.

Outside of the EU, Singapore, Aus, NZ, Canada and Middle East are probably the best places that will recognise US training off the bat (i.e., Board Certified).

EU training is generally longer so they are less keen on approving someone with a 4 year residency for what they view takes 6 years+; but you have several years experience practicing, so it's quite different story. If you want to go to germany, there definitely are jobs, but you will need to apply to each state individually, AFAIK.
 

icristi58

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Thank you johnny9 for your reply. I will check the UEMS website today. I appreciate your input.
 

superoxide

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You can work in Canada if you are board certified in the US. I personally know someone who did his IM residency in the U.S and is now working in Canada as an attending physician.
 

icristi58

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I believe Canada requires permanent residency or citizenship, as far as I know.
Am I wrong?