rx515

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After not having a lot of luck so far this cycle, I have begun to really work on my plan B. This May I will graduate and will have employment opportunities in pretty much every state. I plan to reapply to medical school for the 2010-11 cycle if in the end I am not successful. Is there a specific state I should look into moving to that gives state residents a lot of preference compared to other states. States I should avoid (Cali)? I currently am a resident of Minnesota. I know its not over til its over, but I am going to start looking into employment opportunities just to be on top of things.
 

236116

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i'd avoid the wiche/wami states, cali, maybe texas. idk what residency rules are there, though.

new york, maybe?
 
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RevivedPreMed

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Anywhere but Florida! I don't need anymore competition.

In all seriousness... Texas, Florida, New York most likely
 

Pedsbro

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IMO, Texas or Ohio are your best bets. Residency rules are reasonably simple to understand. I know at least two docs who moved to Texas solely to become residents and apply to TX schools.
 

rx515

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Florida and Texas are especially appealing to me because they have no state income tax... I think since wont be applying until summer 2010 I should be able to become a resident for application purposes. I will definitely look into these further
 

Forthegood

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If you like Lexington... Kentucky gives all in-states a secondary, and pretty much (though not all, I haven't heard anyone not get one) everyone in-state gets an interview. They save at least 80 spots (supposedly) for Kentucky residents, out of about 110ish in the class. Averages looking like 32-33 this year for MCAT tho...

Of course, now that you have your options, my advice is choose a CITY and a med school that you like. :thumbup:
 

michigator04

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Of course, now that you have your options, my advice is choose a CITY and a med school that you like. :thumbup:
I disagree with this sentiment. If the OP goes through a whole cycle without an acceptance, then they cannot afford to get attached to one city (or school) in particular. No offense to the OP, as I went through this too, but there is likely a significant hole in his/her app. that resulted in rejection. Some of those holes can be hard to fix (GPA for example).

My thoughts for what to do in this situation:

1. Assess what went wrong this time. Ask schools that rejected you what you can do to improve and focus on doing that in your time off.

2. Go to a state (TX, OH, and FL are examples) that has many public medical schools, and apply to all of them.

3. Also apply to lots of OOS friendly schools and non-"Top 20" schools. Make sure you complete at least 20+ secondaries.
 

guamboy

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I'm new to the whole premed stuff.
Just wondering, why is California an undesirable state to move in, in terms of Med School? Is it because of the difficulty to get accepted?
 

236116

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I'm new to the whole premed stuff.
Just wondering, why is California an undesirable state to move in, in terms of Med School? Is it because of the difficulty to get accepted?
yup.

not even cali kids can get into cali schools.
 

RoyBasch

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I'm really glad someone started this thread, I was wondering about the same question myself.
-Roy
 

rx515

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No offense to the OP, as I went through this too, but there is likely a significant hole in his/her app.
Definitely will be addressing holes, that is why I'm waiting until 2010 to reapply. My GPA is fine 3.91, MCAT was 33 (above 10 in each section) (M writing though..) and I wont retake probably. I believe my issue was that I decided late in the game to apply to medical school so my volunteering is way too light and i have no research experience. I will be doing some more shadowing as well and of course applying EARLY!!
Thanks for everyones input so far!
 
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Forthegood

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Your app is good aside from the research/experience. I still say try to find a place that you really enjoy. I feel strongly that actually being excited about the school and wanting it do show through in the interviews. Worst case, you go somewhere else. But yeah, choose a place with more than 1 medical school. Also, be realistic about the places you look at. But just choosing on places you can definately get in is a good waste of your money. Sure, its just an education, but its 4+ years of your life, and a good amount of cash, so choose a place you'll be satisfied. No regrets.
 

RevivedPreMed

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Definitely will be addressing holes, that is why I'm waiting until 2010 to reapply. My GPA is fine 3.91, MCAT was 33 (above 10 in each section) (M writing though..) and I wont retake probably. I believe my issue was that I decided late in the game to apply to medical school so my volunteering is way too light and i have no research experience. I will be doing some more shadowing as well and of course applying EARLY!!
Thanks for everyones input so far!
Honestly I would just move to a place where you can get the best experiences. Your gpa and mcat are solid enough (IMO) that you don't need to move somewhere simply for residency. The key would be to apply early and focus on your ECs for the next year.

Make sure to locate yourself near a medical school, preferably in a larger city, so that you can have many opportunities to shadow and do research. This is all thats really lacking in your application.

Cities I really love and recommend (based on what the city has to offer and the possibilities for ECs): Chicago, Atlanta, and Boston
 

mgirl21

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TEXAS baby!!!! Every public med school here (8 of em, to be exact) is required to have at least 90% Texas residents in each class. And in state tuition is super cheap. :laugh:

Good luck! :luck::luck:
 

SDN2013

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Washington. You will have a CHANCE of getting into U Wash, and be able to rotate at Seattle Grace, shadow the best neonatal surgeon west of the mississipi, and stare at the best plastic surgeon west of manhattan.
 

cheasus

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Texas hands down... look at tuition, it is likely cheaper than most students here pay for undergrad schools.
 

Samoa

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Texas, definitely. 7 allopathic schools, one osteo school, cheap in-state tuition, coordinated application/match service...hands down the best chance of getting in somewhere.
 

LizzyM

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Cities I really love and recommend (based on what the city has to offer and the possibilities for ECs): Chicago, Atlanta, and Boston
Boston is a very bad choice for those wishing to establish residency for medical school admission. Massachusetts has one of the strictest residency rules.
 

flip26

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Mass has a 5 year residency requirement, I believe the toughest state for establishing residency for educational purposes.

Best states: LA, MS...

Also consider: TX, OH...
 

Emmet2301

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Would moving to a different state for this purpose be a wise decision though? I'm thinking of moving there for college. What do you guys think?
 
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LizzyM

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The rules vary by state. Moving to Massachusetts for college does not qualify you for residency there.

The OP needs to get a job and plans to job hunt in a state that will pay dividends when it comes time to reapply for medical school admission. That's not a bad idea and we've come up with a list of some of the best and worst states.
 

pianola

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Florida FTW:

(1) It's easy to get residency. In Texas, you have to buy property to become a resident. In Florida, you just have to get a driver's license or something. Whatever the case is, it's easy to become a resident.

(2) It's warm here.

(3) Lots of schools in-state. Six to be exact.

(4) You can apply to all of them through AMCAS (avoiding TMDSAS).

My $.02.
 

Samoa

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Florida FTW:

(1) It's easy to get residency. In Texas, you have to buy property to become a resident. In Florida, you just have to get a driver's license or something. Whatever the case is, it's easy to become a resident.

(2) It's warm here.

(3) Lots of schools in-state. Six to be exact.

(4) You can apply to all of them through AMCAS (avoiding TMDSAS).

My $.02.
I'm pretty sure you don't actually have to buy property in Texas. Just live and work there for a year without attending any institution of higher learning. The property option is for establishing residency while attending Baylor College of Medicine.

And only 4 of Florida's 6 schools are allopathic. In Texas, it's 7 of 8 schools.
 

RevivedPreMed

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Boston is a very bad choice for those wishing to establish residency for medical school admission. Massachusetts has one of the strictest residency rules.
I was giving him ideas for nice places to live, not places to gain residency and get into medical schools.
 

RevivedPreMed

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I'm pretty sure you don't actually have to buy property in Texas. Just live and work there for a year without attending any institution of higher learning. The property option is for establishing residency while attending Baylor College of Medicine.

And only 4 of Florida's 6 schools are allopathic. In Texas, it's 7 of 8 schools.
Do you even know what you're talking about?

Florida has 6 allopathic schools. (UF, USF, UCF, FIU, UMiami, FSU)
 

pianola

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I'm pretty sure you don't actually have to buy property in Texas. Just live and work there for a year without attending any institution of higher learning. The property option is for establishing residency while attending Baylor College of Medicine.
??? That's not what the state law says. The state law doesn't mention anything specifically about Baylor College of Medicine or any other institution in Texas.


Florida has 6 allopathic schools. (UF, USF, UCF, FIU, UMiami, FSU)
:thumbup:
 

TexanGirl

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It's not necessary to own property in Texas to gain residency, although that is certainly one way residency can be conferred. You need to establish domicile in Texas 12 months prior to enrollment, and have one of the following apply: 1) own real property in Texas, 2) own a business in Texas, 3) be married to someone who has established a domicile in Texas, 4) have gainful employment in Texas.
 

jkjkjk

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Definitely will be addressing holes, that is why I'm waiting until 2010 to reapply. My GPA is fine 3.91, MCAT was 33 (above 10 in each section) (M writing though..) and I wont retake probably. I believe my issue was that I decided late in the game to apply to medical school so my volunteering is way too light and i have no research experience. I will be doing some more shadowing as well and of course applying EARLY!!
Thanks for everyones input so far!
Damn, even with your stats i would have thought that you would get into a med school. This is getting really competitive.
 

RevivedPreMed

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Damn, even with your stats i would have thought that you would get into a med school. This is getting really competitive.
He applied late and didn't have many ECs. He may still get in though, you never know.
 
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pianola

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4) have gainful employment in Texas.
Oh ok, that was the one I was forgetting. I'm assuming the OP will have 'gainful employment'.

I figured the marriage thing/business thing might not apply to the OP.
 

rowerlauren

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Oh ok, that was the one I was forgetting. I'm assuming the OP will have 'gainful employment'.

I figured the marriage thing/business thing might not apply to the OP.
That's why people from OOS who go to Baylor often times end up buying property is because they cannot have "gainful employment" due to the whole going to medical school thing that takes up their days.
 

Forthegood

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So texas or florida, but plan on taking a year off from school and getting a full-time job... or laying a foundation on a house...

Both seem like bad options. Honestly, study, improve your resume, and apply broadly.

Just my 2 cents, but I'd rather be beefing up my resume than flipping burgers at McDonalds.
 

rx515

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So texas or florida, but plan on taking a year off from school and getting a full-time job... or laying a foundation on a house...

Both seem like bad options. Honestly, study, improve your resume, and apply broadly.

Just my 2 cents, but I'd rather be beefing up my resume than flipping burgers at McDonalds.
Im not worried about finding gainful employment. I am actually graduating with a degree in another health profession(My avatar might hint you at which one...). I came to the realization late in the course of obtaining my degree that I wanted to do medicine and thus that is why i wasnt on the ball with my ecs and apps. A year or two of making real money would probably be good for me anyways.
 

ChubbyChaser

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It depends on whether you just wanna get into a medical school or if you want to get into a top medical school with cheap tuition.

If the latter I would vote California, seriously.
 

otterpop

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It depends on whether you just wanna get into a medical school or if you want to get into a top medical school with cheap tuition.

If the latter I would vote California, seriously.
Only if the OP has a really good application. There's enough space in Cali schools for only 10% of the Cali residents that apply. About 6,000 are competing for ~600 spots. Tough.

But, if you do have a really good application, it's worth it. California is California.
 

chiz2kul

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To the OP:
Sure no one has addressed this, but make sure ur MCAT will not 'expire' by the time u are ready to apply...
 

MDman87

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What about Washington? Obviously there aren't many public schools (like TX or FL), but UWash is a great school that heavily favors IS applicants. Anyone know how their residency works?
 

cbrons

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texas is the best state
Good schools, cheap, etc.
Also you might like it there for when you're done with school, best malpractice situation in the country
 

cbrons

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as an additional note, Carpetbagging is sweet and rebellious

I fully support it

I would love to tell people years down the road that I was a carpetbagger
or tell the kids who lived in the state for years that I "carpetbagged the **** out of em"
hahahahaha I would change my name on SDN to TheCarpetBagger
best . word . EVER
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carpetbagger


This is what happens when you stay up all night
 

cubssox2000

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Illinois has 7 schools, including the largest medical school in the country by seats (UIC).
 

dhbighit

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Honestly, I think the best in-state place is South Carolina.

MOST IMPORTANTLY FOR YOU is that MUSC accepts about 140 per year, with about 135 of those being in-state.

MUSC is a great school, ranked very high in primary care, and middle of the road in research. But the biggest draw is Charleston, which is an amazing city by the beach and a great place to live. They also have a brand new simulation center which is cutting edge and rare and highly valuable to students.

Also USC school of medicine is another option. Its not as good a location and since it is a newer school it is still making its name with slightly lower entering stats, however it is still a great school.

Both places have residency matches in ALL areas all across the country, and with your stats you should be fine seeing as MUSC has about a 30 MCAT average and 3.6 GPA


For real though, if I were in your situation, I would come to South Carolina.

EDIT: For residency you just have to have your name on a rental house or purchased house for 1 year. If you inform the schools that this is what you are doing then from what I have heard they work with you and consider you "close ties" untill it goes through, which really helps.
 

NTF

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Can't speak for other states, but I've been pretty pleased with OH and I have mediocre stats.

OH has 8 medical schools and 6 are public schools.

PUBLIC
1) Ohio State University
2) University of Cincinnati
3) University of Toledo
4) Wright State University
5) Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine
6) Ohio University (DO)

PRIVATE
1) Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine (tuition-free)
2) Case Western Reserve University
 

LizzyM

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Illinois has 7 schools, including the largest medical school in the country by seats (UIC).
But aren't all but 2 private schools making OOS a moot point? Also, I've heard that Southern Illinois University doesn't interview anyone living north of I-80. ;)
 

cubssox2000

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But aren't all but 2 private schools making OOS a moot point? Also, I've heard that Southern Illinois University doesn't interview anyone living north of I-80. ;)
Yes, there are only 2 public schools, but schools like Rush, Loyola and CMS have leaning towards IS (at least according to MSAR). Also, UIC has a class of over 300 students, approximately 70% IS, meaning that around 210 matriculated students are IS. According to the admissions people I have talked to, schools will accept between 2 to 2.5 times the number of seats they have. This means that UIC will accept approxiamtely 475 IS applicants. While this is not a guarantee, that must be one of the highest acceptance rates out there.
 

hypnix

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But aren't all but 2 private schools making OOS a moot point? Also, I've heard that Southern Illinois University doesn't interview anyone living north of I-80. ;)
Yea, pretty much true.
 
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