Which major is less stressful for Pre-Physical Therapy: Fine Arts or Psych?

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StarStunning

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So I'm doing a 3+3 Physical Therapy Program starting this fall and I was wondering which major would be harder. More specifically, which one is alot easier to get a high gpa and less stress in? Psych or Fine Arts?

I would really like my first three years of college work to not be stressful. I'm really into learning about art and the fine arts major involves alot of classes like art history, music history, studio art, creative writing, and theatre.

The psych major requires the general science major courses to be done, unlike the fine arts major which requires more less intense general science. for instance:
(both of these not including major requirements)

Psych Pre Physical Therapy requirements:
General Chemistry I and II
General Biology I
Anatomy and Physiology I and II
General Physics I and II
Elementary Statistics
Elementary Calculus I and II

Fine Arts Pre Physical Therapy Requirements:
Introduction to Chemistry I and II
Anatomy and Physiology I and II
Algebra Based College Physics I and II
Cells and Genes for Non Science Majors
Statistics

In the end, they both lead me to my schools doctor of physical therapy program. Which is better, in terms of less stress and easy grades?

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Fine Arts Pre Physical Therapy Requirements:
Introduction to Chemistry I and II
Anatomy and Physiology I and II
Algebra Based College Physics I and II
Cells and Genes for Non Science Majors
Statistics

Geez, I wish I would've done this 3+3 sequemce. I mean Algerbra based Physics and Intro to chemistry?
 
Which is better, in terms of less stress and easy grades?

I'm sorry but it really agitates me when people want an easy way out. Listen, regardless of what you do, at some point in time you are going to have to work hard. Either you realize that now, or later.
 
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If I were you I would not look for the easiest or least stressful undergrad program. In my opinion things will be harder for you down the road if you take the easy way before grad school. Plus, it will look better if you take the more difficult courses and do well in them.

It's better to get used to the heavy course load now so that you are better prepared later - my suggestion would be to go with the psych major if you're deciding between the two.
 
Hmmm. I started out as an Art major, then moved on to Psych, and now I'm heading back for Physical Therapy... so here is my two cents. I would recommend majoring in Psych, because you'll learn things you can apply in your PT studies (methods of learning, pos/neg reinforcements, biological psychology, neuropsychology, research methods in behavioral sciences). If you're interested in art, as well, you can always take drawing classes as filler courses and fulfill your artsy desires through drawing (or, whatever) outside of the classroom.

Good luck!
 
I'm sorry but it really agitates me when people want an easy way out. Listen, regardless of what you do, at some point in time you are going to have to work hard. Either you realize that now, or later.



I have to agree. I wouldn't want to be blind-sided by the immense difficulty of graduate school because I chose a major that was 'easier' with gpa boosting classes. I'm sure schools take this into account as well...
 
In the end, they both lead me to my schools doctor of physical therapy program. Which is better, in terms of less stress and easy grades?

I hope you didn't get scared away from the other post. I mean, obviously your 3+3 school wouldn't have made a fine arts option if they didn't think it would prepare you for the professional phase of their program. It wouldn't matter if other schools look at your courseload as others have suggested, because technically you're already in PT school.

Answering your question like I did above, I would only assume that the fine arts would be less stressful, depending on your stress threshold that is.

There you go, you have many points of views to your question.
 
do what your interested in!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

not what others suggest

example: I hate my job, Im very stressed. It's easy work, but im not interested in the work, so im stressed out a lot. That's why im headed for pt school.
 
Get a degree you can fall back on if Physical Therapy does not work for you.
 
Listen, it depends on which one you enjoy the most. I had the same decision you did, but I loved art, and went through with that so I'll tell you my side of the story.

First of all, you might THINK art is easier to get an A in, but it's really not. It's subjective as hell. You can spend 5-10 hours working on something just to get a C or a B, whereas in Psychology, more studying actually yield better results. The teachers mood and view of you also have the ability to change your project grades from an A- to a B-, easily. I've had teachers outwardly tell me "Oh hey, I gave this a B? Huh, must've had a bad day". This is the norm.

And don't let the intro art classes fool you. It's those classes that lull you into this sense of "Oh man, I can sail through this no prob", but as soon as you hit those upper division classes, you'll be stressing out. Art all the time, projects up the wazoo, and worse? You'll be surrounded by art students who don't care about getting A's, so you'll find yourself getting lazier and lazier. And then you gotta actually work for those A's. I'm not just talking about "Oh, gotta remember these definitions", I'm talking about literally improving your drawing skills and creativity ALL THE TIME. Now if you're one of those artist's that can draw, good for you. But if you're not much of a drawer, then you better have some amazing concepts. And practice, lots of practice. You can't BS your way out of art (unless you're one of those 'contemporary' artist's, but you can't rely on that all the time)

Either way, they both have their pro's and con's. I wish I went with Psychology, since I'd probably get a better grade with it. I'm more academically inclined, and I've burned myself out with art almost completely now (senior status, sigh). I do have a high GPA (3.7), but that was from hard work and my own inner love for drawing (which has long since died out, but I digress). If you're just thinking of going into art for the sake of having it easier, I'd definitely not recommend it. It's all fun and games until you stab yourself with an X-acto knife for needing to draw ANOTHER 3 point perspective, fully pencil-rendered, 12x18 drawing.

ART PERSPECTIVE: Subjective grading, Lots of Busy Work, Need to be concept heavy, hipsters everywhere, people are pretty chill, creative and fun at times, VERY EXPENSIVE (dude, your 'books' are your tools and materials, except you can't return it later)

Hope this helped!
 
Listen, it depends on which one you enjoy the most. I had the same decision you did, but I loved art, and went through with that so I'll tell you my side of the story.

First of all, you might THINK art is easier to get an A in, but it's really not. It's subjective as hell. You can spend 5-10 hours working on something just to get a C or a B, whereas in Psychology, more studying actually yield better results. The teachers mood and view of you also have the ability to change your project grades from an A- to a B-, easily. I've had teachers outwardly tell me "Oh hey, I gave this a B? Huh, must've had a bad day". This is the norm.

And don't let the intro art classes fool you. It's those classes that lull you into this sense of "Oh man, I can sail through this no prob", but as soon as you hit those upper division classes, you'll be stressing out. Art all the time, projects up the wazoo, and worse? You'll be surrounded by art students who don't care about getting A's, so you'll find yourself getting lazier and lazier. And then you gotta actually work for those A's. I'm not just talking about "Oh, gotta remember these definitions", I'm talking about literally improving your drawing skills and creativity ALL THE TIME. Now if you're one of those artist's that can draw, good for you. But if you're not much of a drawer, then you better have some amazing concepts. And practice, lots of practice. You can't BS your way out of art (unless you're one of those 'contemporary' artist's, but you can't rely on that all the time)

Either way, they both have their pro's and con's. I wish I went with Psychology, since I'd probably get a better grade with it. I'm more academically inclined, and I've burned myself out with art almost completely now (senior status, sigh). I do have a high GPA (3.7), but that was from hard work and my own inner love for drawing (which has long since died out, but I digress). If you're just thinking of going into art for the sake of having it easier, I'd definitely not recommend it. It's all fun and games until you stab yourself with an X-acto knife for needing to draw ANOTHER 3 point perspective, fully pencil-rendered, 12x18 drawing.

ART PERSPECTIVE: Subjective grading, Lots of Busy Work, Need to be concept heavy, hipsters everywhere, people are pretty chill, creative and fun at times, VERY EXPENSIVE (dude, your 'books' are your tools and materials, except you can't return it later)

Hope this helped!

What this astute individual said!!
 
There is no easy degree. Especially if you don't like what your studying. The first two years is pretty much the same for anyone anyway. Choose a degree based on your interest.

I agree with Myze on the art degree. Art is where I started out in college (I've changed a billion times so far :rolleyes: ) The intro classes may seem easy however the workload after the first year increases dramatically. You may not spend hours pouring over your books (minus all the art history) but you will spend probably longer working on art pieces than you would have to just studying books.

Both Psych and Art won't have many pre-req's for your degree so that will be added on to the original course work for psych and art - which will increase more class. More classes = more stress. Again take something you're interested it, it makes studying more relevant and interesting.

With all that, a degree you might not have considered...You might want to look at a general health studies option. I enjoyed those classes, found them relevant to what I was doing, not super stressful, and they had many pre-req's with the degree included.
 
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