Which parts of medicine are considered primary care?

Hamiltonian

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Title is self-explanatory. Family Medicine, Pediatrician, Emergency Medicine? I have no idea.
 

jbz24

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Family medicine, pediatrics (no specialization), internal medicine (no specialization), and I think obgyn
 
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Drrrrrr. Celty

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Well from what I take... it's family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, ob/gyn, DO's see emergency medicine as primary care. Umm that's all I think.
 

illegallysmooth

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Well from what I take... it's family medicine, internal medicine, pediatrics, psychiatry, ob/gyn, DO's see emergency medicine as primary care. Umm that's all I think.
WHAT? No, I don't believe so.
 
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Just to piggy back on FloatOn, my OB/GYN is my PCP.
Last year I received an e-mail from my insurance company letting me know this was an option and encouraging me to do this.
 

Geekchick921

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IM, FP, and Peds, definitely.

Sometimes they consider Ob/Gyn primary care as well. And I think (don't quote me on this) that general surgery can be considered a primary care specialty for loan repayment programs and such.
 

cliffhuxtableDO

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i know this is NOT the general consensus but i've heard a few docs even consider general surgery and ortho as primary care. i know this is NOT the norm, but i can see where they are coming from.
 

illegallysmooth

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From NHSC website:

National Health Service Corps scholars are committed to serve one year for each year of support (minimum of two years service) at an approved site in a high-need Health Professional Shortage Area soon after they graduate, serve a primary care residency (family medicine, general pediatrics, general internal medicine, obstetrics/gynecology or psychiatry for physicians and general or pediatric for dentists) and are licensed.
 

Law2Doc

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i know this is NOT the general consensus but i've heard a few docs even consider general surgery and ortho as primary care. i know this is NOT the norm, but i can see where they are coming from.
Nah they don't meet the definition of primary care and they generally see patients for a single procedure, not as a longterm basis. Not only is this not the norm, but it doesn't even fit the definition.

Primary care is IM, Peds, FP, OBGYN. Psych meets the definition in terms of longitudinal patient care and EM meets the definition as a common primary intake point but I don't think these latter two are really considered primary care by most.
 

TooMuchResearch

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Nah they don't meet the definition of primary care and they generally see patients for a single procedure, not as a longterm basis. Not only is this not the norm, but it doesn't even fit the definition.

Primary care is IM, Peds, FP, OBGYN. Psych meets the definition in terms of longitudinal patient care and EM meets the definition as a common primary intake point but I don't think these latter two are really considered primary care by most.
L2D, what are you doing up so late?
 

JeetKuneDo

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Yeah, I've heard of psychh as being primary care. Off to sleep now.:sleep: