Which to choose for oncology/endocrinology?

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ILovetheOC

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Columbia, Cornell, or HMS? Also, do either of these schools give out merit scholarships? I've heard people get merit scholarships here, but I thought Ivy League schools don't do that.
 

coldchemist

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Run...RUN from these forums while you still can!!! There's an angry mob in here and they're all going to come after you starting...NOW!!!
 

idq1i

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Originally posted by coldchemist
Run...RUN from these forums while you still can!!! There's an angry mob in here and they're all going to come after you starting...NOW!!!

The mob is tired. These people don't learn anyway.
 

elias514

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None of these schools represent a good route to endocrinology or oncology, as these subspecialties of internal medicine are not very competitive. If you're deadset on doing a fellowship in one of these areas at a very prestigious institution (e.g., MD Anderson in Houston), then you should aim for a top tier residency program in internal medicine. However, this suggestion does not imply that you should go to Cornell, Columbia, or Harvard. The fact of the matter is that you can match into a top notch internal medicine residency program from ANY medical school (internal medicine is moderately competitive). If you check the match lists from "unranked" medical schools, you'll find individuals who match at top-tier internal med programs (my girlfriend's cousin, in particular, matched at Duke and he went to UT Memphis for med school). Thus, it's a better idea to take the CHEAPEST route to endocrinology and oncology, especially because the former is not a high paying specialty. Cornell, Columbia, and Harvard are rather expensive. If you have the credentials to get into one of these schools, then you will undoubtedly garner a substantial scholarship from some state school.
 

Spitting Camel

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Originally posted by elias514
None of these schools represent a good route to endocrinology or oncology, as these subspecialties of internal medicine are not very competitive. If you're deadset on doing a fellowship in one of these areas at a very prestigious institution (e.g., MD Anderson in Houston), then you should aim for a top tier residency program in internal medicine. However, this suggestion does not imply that you should go to Cornell, Columbia, or Harvard. The fact of the matter is that you can match into a top notch internal medicine residency program from ANY medical school (internal medicine is moderately competitive). If you check the match lists from "unranked" medical schools, you'll find individuals who match at top-tier internal med programs (my girlfriend's cousin, in particular, matched at Duke and he went to UT Memphis for med school). Thus, it's a better idea to take the CHEAPEST route to endocrinology and oncology, especially because the former is not a high paying specialty. Cornell, Columbia, and Harvard are rather expensive. If you have the credentials to get into one of these schools, then you will undoubtedly garner a substantial scholarship from some state school.

aww, but now how is he going to talk about his wonderful self indirectly?
 
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