Which university or college is the easiest in terms of admission requirements?

No Name

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Hello everybody,

I just graduated from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, with a three-level B.Sc. in life science. I took several courses in biology, chemistry, psychology, and math, and a course in physics and another in biochemistry. I also took many humanities and social sciences courses. My GPA is about 2.9 and I haven't taken the MCAT yet.
My question is: considering my GPA and the courses I've taken and without regard to the location, what is the easiest university or college for me in terms of admission requirements in the medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy fields? :confused:


Thank you very much for your help in advance.

No Name.
:)
 

allthaticanbe

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Though sistuation, maybe you should get a second degree to bring up your GPA or why not take extra classes in something that comes easy to you.
Try taking classes at Ryerson where there is less competition in sciences to bring up your GPA.
 
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somemaybedoc

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I don't think a 2.9 is gonna be good enough, I'd look into a postbac or something to get your GPA up.
 

vp826

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Do you have any volunteering, shadowing, or researching under your belt?
 

keepdreaming

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No Name said:
Hello everybody,

I just graduated from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, with a three-level B.Sc. in life science. I took several courses in biology, chemistry, psychology, and math, and a course in physics and another in biochemistry. I also took many humanities and social sciences courses. My GPA is about 2.9 and I haven't taken the MCAT yet.
My question is: considering my GPA and the courses I've taken and without regard to the location, what is the easiest university or college for me in terms of admission requirements in the medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy fields? :confused:


Thank you very much for your help in advance.

No Name.
:)


by now you should know there is no "easy" anything. :thumbdown:
 

Mr. Tee

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keepdreaming said:
by now you should know there is no "easy" anything. :thumbdown:
lol @ your screen name
 

Everglide

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um.. you may want to look into a non-us medical school. Obviously there are a lot of disadvantages of doing this. If you want to get into an allopathic med school then you're going to have to absolutely dominate the mcat (40+) and have some research/volunteer/clinical experience. The better option would take grad classes and get your gpa up. Have you honestly seriously considered professional school?
 

MedStudentWanna

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Everglide said:
um.. you may want to look into a non-us medical school. Obviously there are a lot of disadvantages of doing this. If you want to get into an allopathic med school then you're going to have to absolutely dominate the mcat (40+) and have some research/volunteer/clinical experience. The better option would take grad classes and get your gpa up. Have you honestly seriously considered professional school?
Just a heads-up. Grad classes will not affect your undergrad GPA, so it would be pointless to get into a professional school. The best bet is to continue taking undergrad classes until you can bring your GPA up at least a few tenths.
 

Everglide

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I guess what I meant by grad school, is do well in grad school and show that you're capable of doing well. I don't know how he would take more ungrad classes since he already graduated.
 

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Everglide said:
I guess what I meant by grad school, is do well in grad school and show that you're capable of doing well. I don't know how he would take more ungrad classes since he already graduated.
Anyone can go take more undergrad classes. You don't HAVE to be working toward a degree to take them.
 

Scottish Chap

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No Name said:
Hello everybody,

I just graduated from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, with a three-level B.Sc. in life science. I took several courses in biology, chemistry, psychology, and math, and a course in physics and another in biochemistry. I also took many humanities and social sciences courses. My GPA is about 2.9 and I haven't taken the MCAT yet.
My question is: considering my GPA and the courses I've taken and without regard to the location, what is the easiest university or college for me in terms of admission requirements in the medicine, dentistry, or pharmacy fields? :confused:


Thank you very much for your help in advance.

No Name.
:)
No such thing exists. Medical schools and the allied health professions generally look to recruit a diverse student body and so high grades alone, while important, are not the only determinant for a successful admissions cycle. Canadian medical schools all look for a GPA >3.5; even McMaster uses this as an unofficial cut-off now and their mean GPA is close to 3.75. U.S. allopathic medical schools have a mean GPA of around 3.6 and osteopathic medical schools have a mean GPA of around 3.35. It will be critical for you to score well on the MCAT.

First, figure out if you want to be a physician, a dentist, or a pharmacist, and take it from there...........
 

Law2Doc

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Everglide said:
um.. you may want to look into a non-us medical school. Obviously there are a lot of disadvantages of doing this. If you want to get into an allopathic med school then you're going to have to absolutely dominate the mcat (40+) and have some research/volunteer/clinical experience. The better option would take grad classes and get your gpa up. Have you honestly seriously considered professional school?
There is no such sliding scale formula which would allow someone with a sub 3.0 GPA to become admittable with a very high MCAT. That is SDN myth -- the ideal applicant has done at least moderately well in both. It should also be noted that someone who is a B- student tends not to be the one who is likely to rock the MCAT anyhow.
To the OP -- if you want to go into medicine, which is unclear based on the multitude of paths in your post, you are going to need to raise that GPA by taking more courses. I wouldn't bother with the MCAT yet, as you likely have a while of school to go.
And don't choose your career by "what is easiest". Medicine, Dentristry, Pharmacy are not really jobs you just "fall into". The path of least resistance is almost never a job you will be happy in. Decide what you want to do with your life -- through shadowing and talking to professionals in each of these industries. Then take more classes and other affirmative steps to make it happen.
 

MonkeyNuts!

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Hrmmm so I hear grad school won't do crap for your GPA. Then I also have heard that post bacc stuff just looks bad to ADCOMs. Best thing to do? Take a crap load of post bacc stuff. Raise your GPA. Take the GRE. Get into a nice PHD program. Invent a new amazing drug. Make billions. Buy up a hospital, then another, then another till you get a chain. Sell out to insurance groups and pharma. Fire any doctor you want. Go drunk with power.

...

In all seriousness, I'd do some sort of masters program with some biology components and ace the hell out of it to show you have what it takes. Georgetown has one that also comes with an interview guaranteed. Johns Hopkins has got some in its School of Public Health.
 

Law2Doc

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eternalrage said:
Hrmmm so I hear grad school won't do crap for your GPA. Then I also have heard that post bacc stuff just looks bad to ADCOMs. Best thing to do? Take a crap load of post bacc stuff. Raise your GPA. Take the GRE. Get into a nice PHD program. Invent a new amazing drug. Make billions. Buy up a hospital, then another, then another till you get a chain. Sell out to insurance groups and pharma. Fire any doctor you want. Go drunk with power.

...

In all seriousness, I'd do some sort of masters program with some biology components and ace the hell out of it to show you have what it takes. Georgetown has one that also comes with an interview guaranteed. Johns Hopkins has got some in its School of Public Health.
You will actually see a ton of post bacs in med school. Whoever told you that post bac stuff looks bad was wrong -- although certainly some postbacs look better than others. Additionally, graduate courses such as in a SMP or science masters do nothing to raise your GPA, but can show current success in science courses, which is sometimes enough for someone with borderline stats to get in. Someone with a 2.9 probably needs to raise his GPA up a bit first before doing a SMP.
 

MonkeyNuts!

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Law2Doc said:
You will actually see a ton of post bacs in med school. Whoever told you that post bac stuff looks bad was wrong -- although certainly some postbacs look better than others. Additionally, graduate courses such as in a SMP or science masters do nothing to raise your GPA, but can show current success in science courses, which is sometimes enough for someone with borderline stats to get in. Someone with a 2.9 probably needs to raise his GPA up a bit first before doing a SMP.
Interesting. I dunno too much about post bacc... I think what I wrote was just the general opinion of the JHU health professions committee, but don't quote me on that cuz I'm not sure. But regardless, you stated that some post bacs look better than others - how and why? What would be a solid post bac regimen of courses?
 

Law2Doc

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eternalrage said:
But regardless, you stated that some post bacs look better than others - how and why?
There are postbac programs which have strong reputations with adcoms, and effectively give a brand name to your postbac education. The formal programs (i.e. the Bryn Mawr/Goucher/Columbia/Tufts/etc. model, for example) tend to be regarded quite highly, and the Directors of those programs meet periodically with med school deans to market their students. (Many of these programs are geared towards students who have not taken the prereqs, though some places have upper level offerings). By contrast, if you took classes on your own at a less prestigious school, community college or online, it might not be looked at the same way. And there are lots of shades of gray postbacs in between, both formal and informal, some more successful at placing applicants than others.
 

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TSK

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Ummm, ever heard of a post-bac program?!

Everglide said:
I guess what I meant by grad school, is do well in grad school and show that you're capable of doing well. I don't know how he would take more ungrad classes since he already graduated.
 

Dr.Acula

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If this is really what you want to do, i would say do some post bacc, get a really high MCAT, i'm talking 37+ and brush up on EC's. Make the rest of your application absolutly perfect. I know thats a lot of work, but if you can't get that done i'd say your best shot is at the South Harmon Institute Of Technology, they have a relativly small medical school, but i hear good things. :laugh:
 

defrunner

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OP, despite the best efforts of the people posting on here, don't make what they say the sole determinant behind your decision for post-college. Yes, with a 2.9, you face long odds (but no, it is not impossible).

First, a post-bac, despite what everyone on SDN seems to think, is not the end-all for a low GPA. You can't enroll in one and just automatically assume that if you do well, you're getting in med school somewhere. Post-bac's are designed, and meant for, people who have never taken the prerequisites before (i.e. an English major who decided late to become a doctor). Medical schools look very kindly on the English major who excelled in her studies and proved very capable in her post-bac studies. Since it is not really meant for those who have already taken the classes, it just means you're repeating the classes, and as such, the average of your grades will be taken for AMCAS purposes (since they are all factored in equally). It may help, especially if you're in a reputable program, but I would not count on what people here would have you think.

A special master's program is one in which you take the upper-level science courses, as well as med school classes. People who do well in these, again especially in reputable programs, tend to make their application stronger. A master's program that is science-based is very similar, since they can take a few med school classes if they choose (depending on the program, that is).

My point is, do your research on your own and decide for yourself, instead of making what anonymous posters on SDN the sole determinant behind what is a life-changing decision. Make sure you go to a program that has a good reputation, though, because they usually have a good reputation for a reason.

Now, if you want my unsolicited advice, I'll give you some background. Since one of my majors in undergrad was biology, I felt that it was inappropriate to take a post-bac. Furthermore, a post-bac by no means guarantees acceptance anywhere (and doesn't really make that much of a difference in GPA, considering the amount of credits I accumulated over the course of my double major in business and biology). So, I knew that once I finished the post-bac and if I hadn't get in med school, I basically just wasted a lot of money and time, with the end result being that I was no better off prospect-wise than I was upon graduation.

Now, I had gotten into two out of the three programs I applied to for a master's degree. One was a special master's program in molecular genetics, a field I am very interested in. The other was a science-based master's program in biotechnology (a very enticing industry) and was offered by Johns Hopkins. One program was designed specifically for med school and the other was more broad. While both degrees are useful for med school purposes (as advised by my pre-med advisor), the focus they had was just different. Ultimately, after much deliberation, I chose Hopkins, because not only is it a terrific institution and well-respected academically, but it also offered me more opportunities in terms of networking and potential career prospects, as well as a change of scenery (since the SMP was based only 45 minutes from my home). I needed to get out on my own and I did; I have not regretted my decision since.

Now, I recognize fully what a drawback my undergrad GPA is (2.85). However, a post-bac would not have done a thing for me and would have only been detrimental to my future had I not gotten into med school. I did not go for the SMP because it was time for me to move on with my life and get to try new things. This master's degree affords me the opportunity to have a successful career, should I not get into med school. Obviously my first choice is to become a doctor, but not everyone that wants to be a doctor can be one.

This is my first time applying. I will reapply if I don't get in this cycle and again after that, but there comes a point that I would have to cut my losses if med schools keep rejecting me. At least with the MSc in Biotechnology, I will have a good degree and a good amount of work experience as a fallback plan. I'm just realistic about my chances, percentage-wise, and while this does help strengthen my application for med school, it also helps set me up for the long run. I feel good about my chances, however, and would not apply if I was not confident enough in my application to believe that someone will take a second look at me in spite of this major drawback. There is nothing I can do about my undergrad GPA, but I can make damn sure that everything else about my application is solid (which it is). Nail that MCAT though; 33+ would be good.
 
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