Jlaw

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I'm a post bacc student who will be taking the MCAT in a little over a year from now. I am planning on being a TA at my school next year both for an extra volunteer activity and for an MCAT refresher. That said, in which subject would the extra review be most beneficial? I've heard physics is a big part of the MCAT, but unfortunately I don't take it until the fall so TA'ing won't be an option.

Thanks in advance.
 

Jlaw

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Cool thanks, I think thats probably the area I need the most work in as well so that is good.​
 

BerkReviewTeach

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I agree with dingyibvs on this. Biology is the most tested and most information intensive, so TAing for a class like genetics, physiology, or cell bio would be extremely helpful.

It's good that TAing for physics is not an option, because the way college physics is taught really does not mesh that well with MCAT physics. MCAT physics involves applications of concepts and a good deal of common sense visualization. College physics involves memorizing equations, practicing with calculation-based problems, going through steps of math and spitting out an answer with the aid of a caclulator, and not really learning to visulize physics. I strongly believe that a good high school physics class will prepare you more for the MCAT than the average college physics class.

And you might get some more responses if you posted this in the MCAT forum or the non-trad forum.
 

MegaSpectacular

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I agree with dingyibvs on this. Biology is the most tested and most information intensive, so TAing for a class like genetics, physiology, or cell bio would be extremely helpful.

It's good that TAing for physics is not an option, because the way college physics is taught really does not mesh that well with MCAT physics. MCAT physics involves applications of concepts and a good deal of common sense visualization. College physics involves memorizing equations, practicing with calculation-based problems, going through steps of math and spitting out an answer with the aid of a caclulator, and not really learning to visulize physics. I strongly believe that a good high school physics class will prepare you more for the MCAT than the average college physics class.

And you might get some more responses if you posted this in the MCAT forum or the non-trad forum.
Agreed that bio is the most info heavy, therefore probably the most beneficial to have a lot of exposure to. It is harder to gain biological fluency than it would be chemistry or physics.

Ochem is hit or miss.
 

apumic

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I agree with dingyibvs on this. Biology is the most tested and most information intensive, so TAing for a class like genetics, physiology, or cell bio would be extremely helpful.

It's good that TAing for physics is not an option, because the way college physics is taught really does not mesh that well with MCAT physics. MCAT physics involves applications of concepts and a good deal of common sense visualization. College physics involves memorizing equations, practicing with calculation-based problems, going through steps of math and spitting out an answer with the aid of a caclulator, and not really learning to visulize physics. I strongly believe that a good high school physics class will prepare you more for the MCAT than the average college physics class.

And you might get some more responses if you posted this in the MCAT forum or the non-trad forum.

At least where I am, the engineering physics course does this much better than the trig/algebra-based one for science and pre-professional students. The engineering physics course uses primarily complex application types of problems with an emphasis on integrating and visualizing the concepts. I don't know how it is at other schools, but it may be similar since typically the gen physics for engineering is more rigorous in the problems assigned and, therefore, less likely to be simply plug 'n' chug.
 

BerkReviewTeach

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At least where I am, the engineering physics course does this much better than the trig/algebra-based one for science and pre-professional students. The engineering physics course uses primarily complex application types of problems with an emphasis on integrating and visualizing the concepts. I don't know how it is at other schools, but it may be similar since typically the gen physics for engineering is more rigorous in the problems assigned and, therefore, less likely to be simply plug 'n' chug.
Engineers seem to do great on the MCAT, so there must be something to the way engineering classes (like physics for engineers) is taught. That sounds like a great class for learning, although the complex applications would beat the tar out of me I'm sure.