bigbutrealdreams

2+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2015
223
99
For acid-base attached, I completely do not understand the reasoning. Yes, I know the base and acid involved are strong, but the abundance part is confusing.

For calculations, I do not understand the set-up. Will I ever have to do a similar set-up on actual DAT?
 

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Graffix

2+ Year Member
May 12, 2015
140
87
Status
Pre-Dental
I dont fully understand the first one either.

But for the second one:

assuming a 100ml solution 70% of it is HNO3. so 70ml HNO3 for 100ml solution. Molarity is Moles per Liter solution. We can use dimensional analysis!

(70ml HNO3 / 100 ml solution) (1000 ml solution / 1 l solution ) ( 1.42 g HNO3 / 1 ml HNO3 ) (1 mol HNO3 / 63 g HNO3) Cancel all the units and leave all the numbers and its Molarity. Its easier to see written out as actual fractions..

I have seen something like the 2nd question on DBC and kaplan.
 
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bigbutrealdreams

bigbutrealdreams

2+ Year Member
Aug 24, 2015
223
99
I dont fully understand the first one either.

But for the second one:

assuming a 100ml solution 70% of it is HNO3. so 70ml HNO3 for 100ml solution. Molarity is Moles per Liter solution. We can use dimensional analysis!

(70ml HNO3 / 100 ml solution) (1000 ml solution / 1 l solution ) ( 1.42 g HNO3 / 1 ml HNO3 ) (1 mol HNO3 / 63 g HNO3) Cancel all the units and leave all the numbers and its Molarity. Its easier to see written out as actual fractions..

I have seen something like the 2nd question on DBC and kaplan.
awesome! thanks man
 

clutchfans

5+ Year Member
Feb 28, 2014
431
169
For the first one, try to think of abundance as which side is more favored. Reactants or products?

So you have a strong organic acid and a strong organic base. They react to form ethane and t-butoxide. Even though t-butoxide is a very strong base, ethane is a terrible acid, so it will not donate that H+.
Thus the reaction will be forced to the right, that's why you have your products are in higher "abundance" once the reaction takes its course.

Hope this helps.