WHO WOULD hire a foreign trained dentist who graduated from a Dental Board of CA

Mar 26, 2010
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Who would hire a foreign trained dentist who graduated from a Dental Board of CA
aproved school???

The first students from the Mexican school, Universidad de La Salle Bajio, will be graduating this year apparently. The is the first international school that is being aproved by the Dental board of CA, due to the bill passed in 1998, AB 1116. Do not know the details about when they will be taking the Board Exams, but i do know that they will have completed an entire year of residency, which is awesome. With this said, I am wondering if there are any Dentists OUT THERE in CALIFORNIA, who would hire such dentists. I currently got accepted to this school. DO you think there is a chance for these kids to get jobs in California???

THIS school is not approved by the ADA... :( But their facilities are awesome. BTW this school has a great reputation in MEXICO. Dental Program is not easy, but it is very, very hands on, you start seeing patients, and helping at the clinic during the first semester.
Please answer, before I make my final decision to accept their invitation to start their dental program....
By the way, this program is 5 years, 1 year of residency included... DDS is awarded in this program, after completion of dental board exam in CA.
Thx yall;)
 

omaralt

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I'm assuming most I the students will be Hispanic students so ur best shot at getting hired will be in southern Cali. Unfortunately that job market is horrible. Many dentists are working as hygienists to make ends meet. You will also definitely be at a disadvantage as you will have no alumni network to help with job placement. If the dentist is a grad of USC he is more likely to hire a USC grad vs a foriegn grad
 

dl9006

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why do they need more dentists in california?
 
Mar 26, 2010
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why do they need more dentists in california?
They don't but I really want to be one and practice?
This year, the first wave of graduates will arrive, not only that, it's a total of 5 students that get accepted into this school each year. :oops:

Truth is, my best shot at getting a job, is to put a practice with other colleagues from the graduate school. I am just wondering, why would Dental Board of California accept this school in the first place? they must have done something right, right?
 

omaralt

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They don't but I really want to be one and practice?
This year, the first wave of graduates will arrive, not only that, it's a total of 5 students that get accepted into this school each year. :oops:

Truth is, my best shot at getting a job, is to put a practice with other colleagues from the graduate school. I am just wondering, why would Dental Board of California accept this school in the first place? they must have done something right, right?
Not really. A few years ago California used to be very difficult to practice in (like Florida). The politicians decided there was an access to care issue so they decided to open up California and allow anybody to practice there. They now accept the WREB's, reciprocity, PGY-1, and now they accept a Mexican dental school. That is the reason why dentistry sucks in California and why dentists are working as hygienists. I would avoid California and specifically southern California if at all possible.
 

Aceofspades

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If this school in Mexico is really cheap then it would probably be worth it. Factor in the exchange rate and you could be looking at a steal. You can save a lot of money and work in CA (not great, but imagine someone with USC debt levels doing that). If push comes to shove you can probably undercut other new grads by working for less, knowing you will have less debt and can afford it.

Edit:
Oh, and you can go on to specialize and make a killing with very little debt. Hmm, I should have gone that route...
 
Mar 26, 2010
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If this school in Mexico is really cheap then it would probably be worth it. Factor in the exchange rate and you could be looking at a steal. You can save a lot of money and work in CA (not great, but imagine someone with USC debt levels doing that). If push comes to shove you can probably undercut other new grads by working for less, knowing you will have less debt and can afford it.

Edit:
Oh, and you can go on to specialize and make a killing with very little debt. Hmm, I should have gone that route...
This is another plan that i am looking at, I can apply as an international student and specialize, which would in turn allow me to be approved by the ADA.. THIS WOULD BE AWESOME FOR ME, but before that, I have to find out, if being a graduate of this school, will give me the free pass to enter a specialty program :p
I am still doing research, i have also been looking into options of doing Residency programs here in the US that will allow me to have a better opportunity to get a job, since they will notice that i I have done 2 years of residency... (1 abroad, which by the way takes place in rural areas, doing community outreach volunteering( i am pretty sure, gotta double check), and 1 year in a residency here in the US)
I also am emailing specialization schools here in the US, if I can go straight into their program, before doing IDP programs, which usually last 2 years (International Foreign Trained Dentist), a route that i would hate to take.
 
Mar 26, 2010
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so you mean it's not approved by CODA?
it is aprooved.
I thought that they were 2 dif entities....
I will have to research on that, I have read that it is approved by CODA, but that it is not approved by ADA...Oh man, i'll post in a few with details.



I could be wrong
 
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Mar 26, 2010
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so you mean it's not approved by CODA?
Thi is what i got so far.

Accreditation
Dental education accreditation, initiated in the early 1900s, is conducted today by the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA), which operates under the auspices of the American Dental Association.
It is a peer review mechanism that includes the involvement of members of the discipline, the broad educational community, employers, practitioners, the dental licensing community and public members. All of these groups participate in a process designed to ensure educational quality.

CDA-- posted the following
''Although AB 1116 allowed the Dental Board to approve non-CODA accredited schools, the intent has always been for the board’s process to mirror CODA’s to the greatest extent possible. In fact, the Dental Board approached CODA about the possibility of contracting with it to evaluate foreign schools. CODA’s organizational structure at the time prevented the possibility of contracting. Nevertheless, the board utilized CODA accreditation standards in developing their own approval process regulations, and the board has since consistently included former CODA members in its site visits to applicant schools. ''

THIs is from 2007, so i do not know if there are any adjustments that have been made lately.

ALSO, according to ADA
The dental board approached the ADA Commission on Dental Accreditation at the time to investigate the feasibility of contracting with CODA to evaluate programs, but at the time CODA did not have that type of organizational structure in place. Instead, the board used CODA accreditation standards to develop its own approval process regulations.
In 2005, the ADA House of Delegates approved a resolution that enables the ADA and CODA to begin providing fee-based consultation and accreditation to predoctoral international dental programs. Six international dental education programs are in the early stages of consultation with CODA.
Under California AB 1116, international dental programs can apply for approval with the dental board. The board granted provisional approval to Universidad De La Salle in August 2002 after the first site visit. Following its second site visit, De La Salle's five-year predoctoral dental education program received full certification in November 2004.
 

monreal

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It's not approved by CODA.
(CODA) Commission on Dental accreditation is an ADA commission.

It is only approved by California Dental Board. It is also silly to think they only produce 5 dentists/year! How about the regular class who did 5 years there? (not FTD's)
 
Mar 26, 2010
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It's not approved by CODA.
(CODA) Commission on Dental accreditation is an ADA commission.

It is only approved by California Dental Board. It is also silly to think they only produce 5 dentists/year! How about the regular class who did 5 years there? (not FTD's)
You are right, about it not being CODA Accredited and not being recognized by the ADA. But i Am talking about the 5 students who do the 5 year programs who are automatically eligible to take the Board Exam for state of CA only.

Of course there is the IDP program, but it is different from the one that I am talking about. The program I am talking about is the one that prepares brand new dentists, not existing dentists.

The IDP Program building looks amazing BTW

http://www.lasalleids.com/gallery.aspx
 

dl9006

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You are right, about it not being CODA Accredited and not being recognized by the ADA. But i Am talking about the 5 students who do the 5 year programs who are automatically eligible to take the Board Exam for state of CA only.

Of course there is the IDP program, but it is different from the one that I am talking about. The program I am talking about is the one that prepares brand new dentists, not existing dentists.

The IDP Program building looks amazing BTW

http://www.lasalleids.com/gallery.aspx
wow beautiful building.


perhaps asking predents and dental students is not the best idea?
none of us went that route so I think you might be better off asking some other authority

good luck
 

Daurang

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why do they need more dentists in california?
Right now there's an underground network of unlicensed foreign dentists treating only illegals for cash. In their garage, they do molar root canals for $200 and removable for $300 per arch. In a few months, 10-15 million illegals will be granted amnesty so California will needs all the new dentists they can to cover their new citizens.
 

DrReo

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Right now there's an underground network of unlicensed foreign dentists treating only illegals for cash. In their garage, they do molar root canals for $200 and removable for $300 per arch. In a few months, 10-15 million illegals will be granted amnesty so California will needs all the new dentists they can to cover their new citizens.
The only big difference is that you may end up paying more for those canals. :D
 

omaralt

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Right now there's an underground network of unlicensed foreign dentists treating only illegals for cash. In their garage, they do molar root canals for $200 and removable for $300 per arch. In a few months, 10-15 million illegals will be granted amnesty so California will needs all the new dentists they can to cover their new citizens.
Lol. Very wishful thinking. And I really don't understand ur logic. Illegals can go to regular dentists, what would change if their immigration status changes? There is still a lack of jobs in southern California and too many dentists
 

BlueToothHunter

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Lol. Very wishful thinking. And I really don't understand ur logic. Illegals can go to regular dentists, what would change if their immigration status changes? There is still a lack of jobs in southern California and too many dentists
I see a lot of Denti-Cal patients whose parents are obviously undocumented. I see even more adult patients whose primary identification is the Mexican consulate general card. So the illegals should not fear going to the dentists at all... I heard that California is already a haven for many undocumented people.
 
Mar 26, 2010
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I see a lot of Denti-Cal patients whose parents are obviously undocumented. I see even more adult patients whose primary identification is the Mexican consulate general card. So the illegals should not fear going to the dentists at all... I heard that California is already a haven for many undocumented people.
I guess knowing Spanish super well, as well as dental terminology in spanish is going to help me out a lot then huh???
:p
I am getting sooped up watching nasty dental procedures, the first few seconds are rough, but then it all gets better from there...

I just luv complete implant procedures! :D
 

mike3kgt

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I am getting sooped up watching nasty dental procedures, the first few seconds are rough, but then it all gets better from there...
Sounds like something Quagmire would say. Ooh-right!!
 

BlueToothHunter

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Interesting... back in 2008 when the Dental Board of California approved De La Salle's program, these articles were in the ADA News...

http://www.ada.org/prof/resources/pubs/adanews/adanewsarticle.asp?articleid=3156

http://www.ada.org/prof/resources/pubs/adanews/adanewsarticle.asp?articleid=3154


Costs of De La Salle vs. other IDPs in California

Posted Aug. 18, 2008
:sleep:
Dr. Luis Dominicis, a member of the Advisory Committee to the Dental Bureau of California and a Universidad De La Salle graduate himself, said the cost of Universidad De La Salle's International Dental Studies Program that satisfies the educational requirement for California dental licensure is $21,000 per semester, which totals $84,000 in tuition for the two-year program.

Main article
International dental program in Mexico raises questions

That figure does not include mandatory fees such as books, equipment/supplies, lab fees and instruments. However, De La Salle's international program costs significantly less than the International Dental Programs offered by CODA-accredited dental schools in California:

University of California-Los Angeles School of Dentistry's Professional Program for International Dentists: $101,870 (not including fees);
University of California-San Francisco School of Dentistry's International Dentist Program: $140,840 (not including fees);
University of Southern California School of Dentistry's Advanced Standing Program for International Dentists: $134,000 (including fees);
University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry's International Dental Studies program: $150,093 (not including fees);
Loma Linda University School of Dentistry's International Dentist Program: $136,000 (not including fees).
 
Mar 26, 2010
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Yes. I do agree, the program that i got into though is the 5 year program, and it gives me the same benefit, Cost in total 100k-120k..... with fees.
 

browncrack

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BSDs can always do a US perio residency and work in FL as a periodontist. Who needs CODA anyway? From what I've seen in dental school the standards cannot be extremely high for CODA accreditation.
 

mike3kgt

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lol... anybody have papers?

I don't know why I would need papers, but for some reason, every thread discussing IDGs needs to have at least one message about "papers".:laugh:
 

gte1974

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are the ones badmouthing the program.

I guess that these comments are to eliminate the competition? and they can get in?

Will the school get Re-accredited? it is all politics people!

is the program good? well i can tell you get what you put in, if you go there from a foreign country with little or no experience and meet the minimum requirements then you will not be a good dentist, or if you haven't practiced complete dentistry in your country and you lack the most recent techniques and just plan on graduating you will be very disappointed in the outcome.


So new members stop flaming, unless you changed your member number to appear anonymous!!!

Will the school get re-accredited? all school have to go thru inspections!!!
 

gte1974

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California had the direct program for licensing up until 2004, where passing the boards and a bench test followed by a clinical exam, you could practice.

most dentists in california recognize properly trained clinicians when they talk to them and test them.

Holding a job or opening a business that will be successful depends on competency!!

A lot of dentists are used to the foreign trained system of dentist!