Why did you apply to osteopathic medical schools?

  • I agree with the osteopathic principles and OMM. (for the additional tools)

    Votes: 31 44.3%
  • I applied to osteopathic medical schools as a back up to allopathic schools.

    Votes: 17 24.3%
  • More nontraditional applicants. Learning with a diverse group will enhance my education.

    Votes: 16 22.9%
  • The MD/DO difference didn't matter. I looked at curriculum, location, etc.

    Votes: 42 60.0%

  • Total voters
    70
  • Poll closed .

han14tra

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Fortunately (or unfortunately depending on how you look at it), I have the choice between MD and DO medical schools? I've been researching the schools individually in terms of residency options, location, OMM, cost, etc. I've read a lot of comments on SDN about why people choose osteopathic schools. However, one person's comments are rather biased so I'd like to ask you all for input.

Thank you
 

Bacchus

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Grades and OMM
 

Dissected

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MCAT. But MD/DO is not a big deal to me, I was going to apply to both anyway, but then I found out my unfortunate verbal score
 
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Brodiewankenobi

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I found that osteopathic schools were much kinder to me as a non-trad student, than some allopathic schools. One or two allopathic schools however, have indicated that being a non-trad was a bit of a plus.
 
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khen7513

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Even prior to taking my MCAT, my mentors were both DOs, and I believed them when they said that the future of medicine is headed towards DO, and its important to have a route other than drugs. But also MCAT.
 

RySerr21

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I applied to schools I thought I would be happy at. A few of them were DO schools, a few of them were MD schools. Thats basically my application story in a nut shell.

Even prior to taking my MCAT, my mentors were both DOs, and I believed them when they said that the future of medicine is headed towards DO, and its important to have a route other than drugs. But also MCAT.
thats an intersting comment...what do you think they meant by that.
 

PunkmedGirl

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Even prior to taking my MCAT, my mentors were both DOs, and I believed them when they said that the future of medicine is headed towards DO, and its important to have a route other than drugs. But also MCAT.

Interesting.
 

French MD

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Location, GPA, and personal experience. My primary care physician is a DO from Western.
 
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Brown8472

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Seriously, can we can some decent well thought out answers! This is a serious question and I want to know what motivates some people to go the D.O. route other than their MCAT. :uhno:
 

PunkmedGirl

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Seriously, can we can some decent well thought out answers! This is a serious question and I want to know what motivates some people to go the D.O. route other than their MCAT. :uhno:

Because going the DO route is no different than going the MD route. You will get a lot of pre-meds who swear that DO is inferior or that its not the same as DO but in the REAL WORLD (and that's were it counts) it is. I'm going DO because its not as cut throat as MD and more non-trad friendly. But those are my reasons, you have to carve out your own reasons for why you want to go DO. :)

Edit: AND CALM DOWN GEESH!! :)
 

aterry

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I honestly believe in the DO philosophy. I like that there isn't that hypercompetitive environment at DO as much as at the MD schools. I would like a more cooperative atmosphere when I am learning such difficult material. I love the OMM as well. I think its a great alternative (and more effective) in a lot of areas of primary care. I also feel strongly about increasing the numbers of primary care docs in this country because it is where there is the biggest need. I also loved that DO schools seem to appreciate my some-what non-traditional route to medicine and my strong community service background more than MD schools.
 

RySerr21

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Because going the DO route is no different than going the MD route. You will get a lot of pre-meds who swear that DO is inferior or that its not the same as DO but in the REAL WORLD (and that's were it counts) it is. I'm going DO because its not as cut throat as MD and more non-trad friendly. But those are my reasons, you have to carve out your own reasons for why you want to go DO. :)

Edit: AND CALM DOWN GEESH!! :)
I honestly believe in the DO philosophy. I like that there isn't that hypercompetitive environment at DO as much as at the MD schools. I would like a more cooperative atmosphere when I am learning such difficult material. I love the OMM as well. I think its a great alternative (and more effective) in a lot of areas of primary care. I also feel strongly about increasing the numbers of primary care docs in this country because it is where there is the biggest need. I also loved that DO schools seem to appreciate my some-what non-traditional route to medicine and my strong community service background more than MD schools.

Ive been starting to wonder how much of this whole "super competitive" student body thing is actually true. EVERY school Ive been to (both MD and DO) has boasted about how they have a very friendly, cooperative environment. Its their attempt to separate themselves from the "other" schools that are hypercompetitive. And the students that I have been talking to seem genuine, so I trust that they aren't lying to try and recruit kids to the school. Maybe its just the schools I applied to (eg i did a good job at picking out non-competitive schools), but I really dont know. I'm starting to think that the medical school proces in general is just not "cut throat" compettiive. One of the internal med residents i work with converted from a career in law. I asked her which was mroe difficult for her and she said medicine was more difficult, but she enjoyed it more because law school was extremely cut throat and it was literally every one for themselves. In contrast, she said in med school that type of mentality didn't exist at all. Everyone was willing to help each other out b/c they all knew they would be better doctors because of it. She went to Loma Linda (MD).

One thing I have heard from each school is that you will always have that group of people who are "gunners" and trying to get in to super competitive residencies, but thats how its gonna be at every school. If thats not your personality type you just let them be. Even my good buddy who is a second year at Western was talking to me about how competitive the class had gotten because boards were starting to creep up. Hes trying to get in to ortho, and he said there is just a lot of tension between other students with similar goals. Thats probably how it is everywhere tho. Anyways, I'm starting to think the hypercompetitiveness thing may just be a little overblown, but I guess we'll find out with in the next few years!
 

p30doc

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Ive been starting to wonder how much of this whole "super competitive" student body thing is actually true. EVERY school Ive been to (both MD and DO) has boasted about how they have a very friendly, cooperative environment. Its their attempt to separate themselves from the "other" schools that are hypercompetitive. And the students that I have been talking to seem genuine, so I trust that they aren't lying to try and recruit kids to the school. Maybe its just the schools I applied to (eg i did a good job at picking out non-competitive schools), but I really dont know. I'm starting to think that the medical school proces in general is just not "cut throat" compettiive. One of the internal med residents i work with converted from a career in law. I asked her which was mroe difficult for her and she said medicine was more difficult, but she enjoyed it more because law school was extremely cut throat and it was literally every one for themselves. In contrast, she said in med school that type of mentality didn't exist at all. Everyone was willing to help each other out b/c they all knew they would be better doctors because of it. She went to Loma Linda (MD).

One thing I have heard from each school is that you will always have that group of people who are "gunners" and trying to get in to super competitive residencies, but thats how its gonna be at every school. If thats not your personality type you just let them be. Even my good buddy who is a second year at Western was talking to me about how competitive the class had gotten because boards were starting to creep up. Hes trying to get in to ortho, and he said there is just a lot of tension between other students with similar goals. Thats probably how it is everywhere tho. Anyways, I'm starting to think the hypercompetitiveness thing may just be a little overblown, but I guess we'll find out with in the next few years!
I've had a similar experience, been on 4 DO and 4 MD interviews. Every school it was brought up at some point how cooperative everyone is and how it is not a cut throat environment at all. With the exception for the handful of gunners which you are bound to find anywhere you attend.
 

Donig27

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what are your reasons for perusing a DO...personally mine is I'm an addict....to learning and problem solving yeah it sounds cheesy but seriously if I could spend my whole life in school learning and figuring out anything I would be the happiest
 

ILikeFood

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what are your reasons for perusing a DO...personally mine is I'm an addict....to learning and problem solving yeah it sounds cheesy but seriously if I could spend my whole life in school learning and figuring out anything I would be the happiest
A cosmetology student could give the exact same explanation for going to cosmetology school. Think of a more specific reason, they'll ask you "Why DO?" in interviews and what you just wrote is crap.
 
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Chocolate Bear

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what are your reasons for perusing a DO...personally mine is I'm an addict....to learning and problem solving yeah it sounds cheesy but seriously if I could spend my whole life in school learning and figuring out anything I would be the happiest
I think your question will be better answered in the current discussion thread on this topic. Moving. :)
 

PunkmedGirl

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Ive been starting to wonder how much of this whole "super competitive" student body thing is actually true. EVERY school Ive been to (both MD and DO) has boasted about how they have a very friendly, cooperative environment. Its their attempt to separate themselves from the "other" schools that are hypercompetitive. And the students that I have been talking to seem genuine, so I trust that they aren't lying to try and recruit kids to the school. Maybe its just the schools I applied to (eg i did a good job at picking out non-competitive schools), but I really dont know. I'm starting to think that the medical school proces in general is just not "cut throat" compettiive. One of the internal med residents i work with converted from a career in law. I asked her which was mroe difficult for her and she said medicine was more difficult, but she enjoyed it more because law school was extremely cut throat and it was literally every one for themselves. In contrast, she said in med school that type of mentality didn't exist at all. Everyone was willing to help each other out b/c they all knew they would be better doctors because of it. She went to Loma Linda (MD).

One thing I have heard from each school is that you will always have that group of people who are "gunners" and trying to get in to super competitive residencies, but thats how its gonna be at every school. If thats not your personality type you just let them be. Even my good buddy who is a second year at Western was talking to me about how competitive the class had gotten because boards were starting to creep up. Hes trying to get in to ortho, and he said there is just a lot of tension between other students with similar goals. Thats probably how it is everywhere tho. Anyways, I'm starting to think the hypercompetitiveness thing may just be a little overblown, but I guess we'll find out with in the next few years!

I guess you could be right about that and it could just be that 'pre-med' perception that I have going on, but I have a feeling (and its just a gut feeling) that I will like DO pathway more. :D
 

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Location, location, location. Plus cracking backs, doing myofascial releases and soft tissue just works well for me. *I have bad neck and back pain*
 

Dakayus

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oh but I will say it's terrible right before a test as we don't know 100% how to do the technique so complications occur. PAIN
It's awesome after everyone learns it, then you just say to your friends HEY OMM this right here! It's awesome!
 

primadonna22274

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Haha, I have to admit I have a little of this selfish desire to learn OMM (and be practiced on) as well since I tweaked my neck about 5 years over in a rollover MVA. Wasn't hurt except for minor injuries, but the neck started acting up a few months later. Sometimes it just feels like my head is too heavy for my neck. An adjustment helps. At the moment it cracks and needs something. *sigh*

Really, though, I applied to DO schools because I have worked with some great DOs, and my DO mentor told me he would be happy to write me a recommendation as long as I applied to his alma mater (DMU). I like the osteopathic "philosophy" although I don't really think DOs have the market cornered on holistic medicine by any means. Also I like the idea of learning medicine a little differently from the way I learned it in PA school a decade ago, which was somewhat reductionist in approach.



Location, location, location. Plus cracking backs, doing myofascial releases and soft tissue just works well for me. *I have bad neck and back pain*
 

midwesterner

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I've heard that DO schools are basically the same as MD schools, and you don't really feel the "holistic" slant. Do you all think DO schools do teach more about the "whole person," preventative care, and lifestyle changes vs. mostly medications/surgery in allopathic schools? That seems like that could be a good reason to choose osteopathic medicine if there is really is a difference in philosophy.
 

RySerr21

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I've heard that DO schools are basically the same as MD schools, and you don't really feel the "holistic" slant. Do you all think DO schools do teach more about the "whole person," preventative care, and lifestyle changes vs. mostly medications/surgery in allopathic schools? That seems like that could be a good reason to choose osteopathic medicine if there is really is a difference in philosophy.

With the exception of OMM, there is no difference in what you learn at an allopathic or an osteopathic school. One is not more holistic than the other. One does not emphasize "preventative care" more so than the other. Its not like you learn about less medications b/c you are focusing on more holistic approaches. At DMU, there is even a special course second year all about learning surgical techniques. You learn EVERYTHING. You learn the same stuff, and at the end, you take the same board exams.
 

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With the exception of OMM, there is no difference in what you learn at an allopathic or an osteopathic school. One is not more holistic than the other. One does not emphasize "preventative care" more so than the other. Its not like you learn about less medications b/c you are focusing on more holistic approaches. At DMU, there is even a special course second year all about learning surgical techniques. You learn EVERYTHING. You learn the same stuff, and at the end, you take the same board exams.
I've never heard of an MD taking the COMLEX. :p
 

RySerr21

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I've never heard of an MD taking the COMLEX. :p
good one *cough* ;) I knew someone was gonna call me out on that, but i figured i'd take my chances cuz i was too lazy to edit it, haha
 

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Did anyone else notice that the poll results are well over 100%?

:rolleyes:
 
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han14tra

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I agree that the poll is weird. I didn't want to force people into one particular choice. I applied to DO schools for several reasons, and I was assuming everyone else did the same.

Good night everyone:sleep:
 

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I applied to medical schools. I honestly don't give a damn about OMM and know I won't use it. The "osteopathic philosophy" is a load of crap too. It is the person and not the school that dictates that. My dad is an MD. He hates medications, he believes in the benefits of CAM and all that stuff. I like the fact there are more non-traditional students at DO schools but the cooperative laid back thing is random too. I know plenty of MD schools that are more laid back than DO schools. Heck, one of my friends took a class trip with a large portion of her MD class a week before an exam to go to mardi gras. Don't buy all the crap they spoon feed you. I have noticed virtually no difference between MDs and DOs in daily practice. It is one thing that made it very difficult to b.s. about during my interviews.
 

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Money, girls, and power. The same reasons everyone applies to medical school.
 

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Grades and a crappy MCAT score. A note to all. If you go to a DO school and expect to get into desirable fields like derm, ophtho, radiology, ortho, ect you are probably better off applying broadly to Allopathic programs if it is somewhere you dont desire. Going the DO route is going to create a huge uphill battle for you.
 

RySerr21

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I applied to medical schools. I honestly don't give a damn about OMM and know I won't use it. The "osteopathic philosophy" is a load of crap too. It is the person and not the school that dictates that. My dad is an MD. He hates medications, he believes in the benefits of CAM and all that stuff. I like the fact there are more non-traditional students at DO schools but the cooperative laid back thing is random too. I know plenty of MD schools that are more laid back than DO schools. Heck, one of my friends took a class trip with a large portion of her MD class a week before an exam to go to mardi gras. Don't buy all the crap they spoon feed you. I have noticed virtually no difference between MDs and DOs in daily practice. It is one thing that made it very difficult to b.s. about during my interviews.

why would you even apply then? That really is the only difference between the two pathways. Why torture yourself for two years? You already konw you are going to dislike it.
 

Semicolon

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why would you even apply then? That really is the only difference between the two pathways. Why torture yourself for two years? You already konw you are going to dislike it.
The reason was in his first sentence: "I applied to medical schools."

He doesn't care where he goes to become a doctor, so he sees both allopathic and osteopathic schools as one. Am I right, MossPoh? :p
 

RySerr21

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The reason was in his first sentence: "I applied to medical schools."

He doesn't care where he goes to become a doctor, so he sees both allopathic and osteopathic schools as one. Am I right, MossPoh? :p
Yea, but it still doesnt really make any sense. Why apply to a medical school (or group of medical schools) that are going to force you to learn something you have no interest in learning?!? I took the same approach, but I applied DO b/c I had an interest in learning and possibly using OMM in my future practice. If I didn't have any interest in OMM, i would have saved my money and not applied to DO schools. Medical school is difficult enough already, why complicate that by wasting hundreds of hours on **** you dont care about?
 

Semicolon

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Yea, but it still doesnt really make any sense. Why apply to a medical school (or group of medical schools) that are going to force you to learn something you have no interest in learning?!? I took the same approach, but I applied DO b/c I had an interest in learning and possibly using OMM in my future practice. If I didn't have any interest in OMM, i would have saved my money and not applied to DO schools. Medical school is difficult enough already, why complicate that by wasting hundreds of hours on **** you dont care about?
I guess because he might not care what he goes through as long as he becomes a doctor in the end?

I don't follow this philosophy myself, so I'm not exactly speaking on his behalf. :D I am indeed looking forward to learning OMM and would love to have it in my "medical arsenal"; whether I use it or not in the future is for me to decide later on.
 

khen7513

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I think I'm supposed to be offended by the "Interesting/Titillating/Stimulating" comments. And I kind of am.

I really do believe people are over-drugged here. I set up clinical trials for my job currently, and most of them have to be in other countries because the United States is already overmedicated. Not to mention they're lazy, and look for the quick fix.

And that was one of the bases that DO was founded on. So, for a hippie like me, thats one of the reasons I went DO.

Obviously those are only my (and my two mentor's) opinions. So if those comments were written facetiously, that's unneccesary and uncool. For shame.
 

Chocolate Bear

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I think I'm supposed to be offended by the "Interesting/Titillating/Stimulating" comments. And I kind of am.

I really do believe people are over-drugged here. I set up clinical trials for my job currently, and most of them have to be in other countries because the United States is already overmedicated. Not to mention they're lazy, and look for the quick fix.

And that was one of the bases that DO was founded on. So, for a hippie like me, thats one of the reasons I went DO.

Obviously those are only my (and my two mentor's) opinions. So if those comments were written facetiously, that's unneccesary and uncool. For shame.
I think the tangent was not meant to be offensive toward you.

I think the "overmedicated" problem in our country is a big one, but is very hard to figure out a "solution," if there is one. Most people, once they become dependent on more than a couple of chronic drug treatments, get frustrated by interactions, side effects, medication lists, and the complexity inherent in any future medical correspondence (i.e., a routine doctor visit).

As we have developed more and more drugs (often to no proven benefit over the previous generation), more and more patients have become fed up with the prescription pad and have sought more complimentary and alternative solutions, as well as/including OMM. I think this is what your original statement was implying. If so, I definitely agree, which is why one can have such a thriving practice as an OMM specialist.
 

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I think I'm supposed to be offended by the "Interesting/Titillating/Stimulating" comments. And I kind of am.

I really do believe people are over-drugged here. I set up clinical trials for my job currently, and most of them have to be in other countries because the United States is already overmedicated. Not to mention they're lazy, and look for the quick fix.

And that was one of the bases that DO was founded on. So, for a hippie like me, thats one of the reasons I went DO.

Obviously those are only my (and my two mentor's) opinions. So if those comments were written facetiously, that's unneccesary and uncool. For shame.
honest curiousity here. by 'a route other than drugs' do you mean OMM? no prodding intended!
 

RySerr21

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I think I'm supposed to be offended by the "Interesting/Titillating/Stimulating" comments. And I kind of am.

I really do believe people are over-drugged here. I set up clinical trials for my job currently, and most of them have to be in other countries because the United States is already overmedicated. Not to mention they're lazy, and look for the quick fix.

And that was one of the bases that DO was founded on. So, for a hippie like me, thats one of the reasons I went DO.

Obviously those are only my (and my two mentor's) opinions. So if those comments were written facetiously, that's unneccesary and uncool. For shame.
same as DoktorB...i was genuinely interesetd and wanted you to expand on your opinion. Now as far as DOs prescribing less medication, I dont really buy that. I see that it was part of initial reason for creating an alternate degree, but now we live in a different time. Unless you are an OMM specialist, and thats ALL you do, DOs are gonna prescribe medication just like MDs. Theres no reason a DO cardiologist would prescribe less meds than an MD cardiologist, or vice versa. Its all going to depend on the individual physician and its probably going to vary highly for each person. Now for someone like yourself, I think you'd prescribe less meds even if you were an MD and think of other ways to help people. I am the exact same way. I'm going to go MD, but i hold your same opinions regarding over medication. Ive even written an article about it, here. And one of the things I'm interested in is clinical research involving dietary habits and preventing and reversing chronic disease, as opposed to just taking the "quick fix" like you mentined. I also just recently wrote my senior paper on the topic of dietary habits and disease prevention, specifically the role of fiber in the prevention of HIV-associated lipodystrophy. In the paper I talk about how there have been clinical trials using drugs like Metformin to help this synrome, but never have they done a clinical trial using fiber, which should have at the very least, the same positive effects, and quite possibly many more. I guess my point is, which ive already stated, is that I think it is more dependent on the person, and not the degree. Now just out of curiosity, do you intend on being an OMM specialist?
 

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GPA, mostly, - the schools closest to where i live did (and probably will, for the ones i haven't heard from yet) deny me secondaries, but also location (i would highly prefer going somewhere in California).

i used to be worried that being a DO would somehow hinder me from finding a career as a successful physician, but it comforts me to know that the difference between being an MD and DO is negligible...
 

PunkmedGirl

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same as DoktorB...i was genuinely interesetd and wanted you to expand on your opinion. Now as far as DOs prescribing less medication, I dont really buy that. I see that it was part of initial reason for creating an alternate degree, but now we live in a different time. Unless you are an OMM specialist, and thats ALL you do, DOs are gonna prescribe medication just like MDs. Theres no reason a DO cardiologist would prescribe less meds than an MD cardiologist, or vice versa. Its all going to depend on the individual physician and its probably going to vary highly for each person. Now for someone like yourself, I think you'd prescribe less meds even if you were an MD and think of other ways to help people. I am the exact same way. I'm going to go MD, but i hold your same opinions regarding over medication. Ive even written an article about it, here. And one of the things I'm interested in is clinical research involving dietary habits and preventing and reversing chronic disease, as opposed to just taking the "quick fix" like you mentined. I also just recently wrote my senior paper on the topic of dietary habits and disease prevention, specifically the role of fiber in the prevention of HIV-associated lipodystrophy. In the paper I talk about how there have been clinical trials using drugs like Metformin to help this synrome, but never have they done a clinical trial using fiber, which should have at the very least, the same positive effects, and quite possibly many more. I guess my point is, which ive already stated, is that I think it is more dependent on the person, and not the degree. Now just out of curiosity, do you intend on being an OMM specialist?
I agree with what ryserr21. Going to a DO school is no different than going to an MD school. I don't believe that DOs prescribe less than MDs do, but rather an individual physician (both MD and DO) may follow this practice. You are only exposed to those two mentors which doesn't represent the whole population of MDs and DOs. I made that comment 'INTERESTING' because I find it interesting that you believe that. ILIKE's comment wasn't directed towards you at all and I don't see how you would have thought it was or find that to be offensive.
 

Pewl

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I applied to DO schools several years ago as a backup. I'm thankful that I ultimately got into an MD school because my goal all along has been radiation oncology. It is near impossible to get into that field as a DO. There might be 1 or 2 DO's per year that match into rad onc.
 

Bacchus

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260+ on your USMLE? :smuggrin: The chance for MDs is extremely low, too. Not as low, but still quite low.
 
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