TJNova2011

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Why on earth are some people attending these new dental schools (FOR PROFIT) that cost so much money? You're degrading dentistry and will be a slave to your loans. Why do you guys keep applying to these schools and letting them bend you over with 100k/yr?
ECU, Midwestern, roseman, new england, new one in FL???????

please let me know, has common sense from previous generous gone by the way??? Is OBAMA going to bail you out? :D
 
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TJNova2011

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What r u talking about? Ecu is 25000 a year
my bad, i forgot that the tax payers are taking care of that one! they'll all end up in Charlotte or Raleigh any way. no dentist going to go help out the moon shiners.
 
Aug 19, 2012
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Why on earth are some people attending these new dental schools (FOR PROFIT) that cost so much money? You're degrading dentistry and will be a slave to your loans. Why do you guys keep applying to these schools and letting them bend you over with 100k/yr?
ECU, Midwestern, roseman, new england, new one in FL???????

please let me know, has common sense from previous generous gone by the way??? Is OBAMA going to bail you out? :D
First of all, you are clearly trying to get a rise out of this forum. I'll bite though.

1.) I want to be a dentist.
2.) My situation with my wife does not allow me to attend my state school.
3.) Sure, they are expensive, but with proper financial planning and reasonable expectations can be paid off.
4.) I will live in a double income household with more financial power to pay off loans.
5.) Did I mention that I want to be a dentist?

Also, I won't respond in depth to your "degrading dentistry" comment. Many great clinical schools are pricey and produce great dentists (Tufts, the Ivies, MW-AZ, NYU, to name a few).

All schools go through a lengthy accreditation process.


TLDR Version:
Go play hopscotch in traffic.
 

teett

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I used to live in San Francisco. And the houses are so expensive, >500k for about 1000 square feet old house in an average neighborhood. I was always wondering why a family owning <5000 a month buy a house like that. --- personally, I would rather be a slave to a student loan than a mortgage.
 
Jan 13, 2011
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What schools are FOR PROFIT? I don't know of any dental schools in the US.
 
May 20, 2011
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my bad, i forgot that the tax payers are taking care of that one! they'll all end up in Charlotte or Raleigh any way. no dentist going to go help out the moon shiners.
Just like they are taking care of every other state school.
 

NDPitch

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I don't know the answer to your question, but I do know that it's unsustainable and it won't continue at this rate forever. Just like the housing bubble, the higher education bubble will eventually burst. We might see a day where it costs 600k or more to become a doctor/dentist, but that can only go on for so long before the house of cards comes tumbling down.
 

user101

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:confused:
 

teett

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I don't know the answer to your question, but I do know that it's unsustainable and it won't continue at this rate forever. Just like the housing bubble, the higher education bubble will eventually burst. We might see a day where it costs 600k or more to become a doctor/dentist, but that can only go on for so long before the house of cards comes tumbling down.
Education bubble? Good idea.
 
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Member902507

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Why on earth are some people attending these new dental schools (FOR PROFIT) that cost so much money?
Haha, because if you don't take the only spot you can get, someone else will!

Btw, I think the OP's a dentist, so I think he's purely questioning. That, or I'm just naive and have a hard time understanding intonation online! Regardless, each student who is entering dental school now is paying a SIGNIFICANT amount of money. The fact that PUBLIC school tuition is $300k or more should be more of a shock than these "for-profit" dental schools. What do you think the public schools are doing with that money?

As long as everyone can justify their actions to themselves, and knows what they're getting into, AND has an idea of what kind of repayment plan you're looking at, I'd say you're good to go! :)
 

Sanedor

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Easy on the Fox News! Don't be afraid, critical thinking IS permitted here.
 
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They would be dumb not to charge that. People are more than willing to pay. From an economics standpoint I'd be surprised if they don't hit 500k in a few years
 

drill-and-fill

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They would be dumb not to charge that. People are more than willing to pay. From an economics standpoint I'd be surprised if they don't hit 500k in a few years
This.

I heard some desperate predents saying that money does not matter and they will pay 600+k as long as they can get in somewhere... So since theres an overwhelming demand still, the price will continue to rise over the upcoming years
 
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TJNova2011

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This.

I heard some desperate predents saying that money does not matter and they will pay 600+k as long as they can get in somewhere... So since theres an overwhelming demand still, the price will continue to rise over the upcoming years
The student's money or their parent's coin?
 

Bereno

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The student's money or their parent's coin?
Does it matter? Supply and demand my friend. Like others have said, they are charging such high price because there is sufficient demand. Seems like you are just trying to ruffles some feathers here...
 
Apr 13, 2011
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I'll bite.

I think it's pretty obvious to everyone- we're all here because we want to be dentists so what if your only acceptance is to a very expensive school? Are you going to turn it down just because it's expensive? No! Sure, being in a boat-load of debt is scary to anyone, but when you think about all of the pros that come with choosing dentistry as a career, I think we'll be fine! Being in the healthcare field, helping others in need and serving the community, pretty much an uncapped earning potential, option of running your own business, flexibility of hours, comfortable lifestyle... what other career can you have these same benefits with the same amount of schooling? Hardly any if any at all.
 
Sep 8, 2012
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Why on earth are some people attending these new dental schools (FOR PROFIT) that cost so much money? You're degrading dentistry and will be a slave to your loans. Why do you guys keep applying to these schools and letting them bend you over with 100k/yr?
ECU, Midwestern, roseman, new england, new one in FL???????

please let me know, has common sense from previous generous gone by the way??? Is OBAMA going to bail you out? :D
that last part coupled with the smiley face makes me think hes trollin this entire post lol
 

timmytim

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this is obviously a troll thread

anyone who gave a sincere answer is an idiot

good job
 
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TJNova2011

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this is obviously a troll thread

anyone who gave a sincere answer is an idiot

good job
Blind pre dents are not aware of the current situation in dentistry. Thanks for your productive comment, dagone
 

timmytim

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Blind pre dents are not aware of the current situation in dentistry. Thanks for your productive comment, dagone
Care to enlighten me on whats going on in dentistry? I thought I learned everything about dentistry from shadowing my dentist a whopping 24 hrs.
 

UltimateHombre

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Why on earth are some people attending these new dental schools (FOR PROFIT) that cost so much money? You're degrading dentistry and will be a slave to your loans. Why do you guys keep applying to these schools and letting them bend you over with 100k/yr?
ECU, Midwestern, roseman, new england, new one in FL???????

please let me know, has common sense from previous generous gone by the way??? Is OBAMA going to bail you out? :D
I will bite... Here are a few of my thoughts...

1. Many states don't have a public dental school, so those of us in that situation are forced to either pay for private school or OOS tution.
2. It is not just the "New" dental schools... it bothers me that they get this stigma. It is nearly "All" dental schools. The traditional privates are just as expensive: NYU, USC, Case, Nova, Penn, Harvard, even Creighton and Marquette are still pricey.
3. Many of the public schools OOS tuition are just as expensive as the private tuition. A few that come to mind are: Louisville, UNLV, UCLA, UCSF, OHSU, etc.
4. The cheapest schools in the nation pretty much only accept students from their individual states: Miss, UAB, LSU, WVU, Texas schools, Kentucky, etc.

What schools are FOR PROFIT? I don't know of any dental schools in the US.
There are no "for profit" dental schools. Many people confuse for profit as private. Private are simply not funded by the federal or state governments. So they have to charge more in tuition to keep up their operating costs.

koreano said:
heard some desperate predents saying that money does not matter and they will pay 600+k as long as they can get in somewhere... So since theres an overwhelming demand still, the price will continue to rise over the upcoming years
You are only partially right. The ultimate factor to tuition going up is the fact that the federal government backs all the student loans. When uncle sam is flipping the bill, the schools can charge whatever the hell they want. If lending was truly privatized, there is no way banks would lend this kind of money for tuition, so it would keep the dental schools in check.
 

Wax n Relax

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What schools are FOR PROFIT? I don't know of any dental schools in the US.
There are for profit schools. It's not the tuition they charge, although that may help out with keeping the school's bottom line up. It has to do with the clinic production. I have a buddy at a newer private school that told me that the school offers incentives (days off of school) if you meet deadlines in the clinic. Yes dental students are slow as hell, but there is still money to be made.
 

AlbinoPolarBear

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You are only partially right. The ultimate factor to tuition going up is the fact that the federal government backs all the student loans. When uncle sam is flipping the bill, the schools can charge whatever the hell they want. If lending was truly privatized, there is no way banks would lend this kind of money for tuition, so it would keep the dental schools in check.
I keep getting sucked into these troll threads...

Sorry for going off-topic on this, but I'd just like to give another viewpoint to the quoted statement.

If lending were truly privatized, then tuition would be lower, but it will still not be low enough for many bright students who come from low-income families. These kids will be more likely to be rejected by the banks if their parents do not have anything to put as collateral. Some of these kids have nothing of value. Dreams will be destroyed in the process. In America, politicians, democrats and republicans, will not let this happen. Low-brow students, who are barely qualified, will get in in place of that bright poor student, increasing the attrition rate. There was a time in the 80's where dental schools closed down due to not having enough capable students to graduate from the programs.

With the government in control of the student loans business, then access to a competitive school will be based more on merit, and less on how big daddy's wallet is.

Unfortunately, we are seeing tuition spiraling out of control, but as globalization progresses, Americans want to be as educated as possible to compete with the rest of the world. We want the brightest students to attain the highest level of education possible, and the government will make this possible by footing the bill.
 

NDPitch

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Unfortunately, we are seeing tuition spiraling out of control, but as globalization progresses, Americans want to be as educated as possible to compete with the rest of the world. We want the brightest students to attain the highest level of education possible, and the government will make this possible by footing the bill.
Instead of composing a long winded reply, I'll just say that I strongly disagree and share UltimateHombre's views when it comes to the federal government and the unlimited amount of money they hand out (aka, printed money out of thin air).

I strongly believe that we will see the consequences of all of this down the road. I think our poor fiscal policies are going to land us in some very tough times down the line (think of Greece and Europe in general)

Just my thoughts.
 

gryffindor

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I don't think the OP is trolling. I have been on these boards forever and seen the cost of dental school double in that time. I am actually interested in the thought process of why pre-dents choose to go into such expensive student debt. I think a student loan bailout is something that will be demanded by the public regardless of who is in office so the Obama smiley jab at the end was just a joke.

Do you know what your monthly loan re-payment will be when you graduate?

What do you expect to make when you graduate? Where do you think you will find a job? Are you willing to move to the boondocks of your state if that is where the money is?

Do you realize that to make the big bucks in this field, you have to be a private practice owner which means owning your own business? Running a business is its own full time job in addition to being a dentist.

Owning a business means you have to take out more loans - either loans to build your own practice or loans to buy an existing one. Add $200k as a very conservative estimate.

Do you plan to have a family? Own a home someday? Suburban homes cost $300k+ where I live. What if you are a woman and want to take some time off while your kids are young. Can you afford to do that and still make your monthly loan repayments?

If you want to specialize, you could be looking to add $200k to your debt to earn your specialty certificate.

I thought about none of these when I was in dental school. But I also didn't graduate with $600k in debt (dental school + residency).
 

Bis-GMA111

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I'm biased about this issue, but I'll chime in anyway..

unless you're taking a scholarship of some sort or have rich parents/family members, i don't see why it would ever be feasible to attend a school that would leave you in the hole with 300k+.

And as a side note: I mean yeah, it's getting bad for the U.S. from a fiscal perspective...but comparing us to Greece? They falsified YEARS of their financial documents for crying out loud. Along with that, what about the shady dealings they had with private banks (i.e. goldman sachs) to cover up real borrowing amounts, and the made up exchange rates they had with monetary conversions? There are a lot of things to factor into the equation, but I can see how you would think that the U.S. is going down that road i suppose.
 

Glimmer1991

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my bad, i forgot that the tax payers are taking care of that one! they'll all end up in Charlotte or Raleigh any way. no dentist going to go help out the moon shiners.
I'm from NC, and I'd be happy to practice in an underserved area! It's definitely not like you wouldn't get any business, and the cost of living would be lower. I'm actually highly considering doing this. The only consideration would be whether or not my (future) spouse would be able to find a stable job in the area--he's planning on going into law.

I agree that $300,000 of debt is just far too high. It makes me want to crawl in a hole just thinking about it. YIKES!
 

Glimmer1991

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I think it's pretty obvious to everyone- we're all here because we want to be dentists so what if your only acceptance is to a very expensive school? Are you going to turn it down just because it's expensive? No!
If I applied and couldn't get into a school that would cost me less than approximately $275,000 to finance, I think I would just wait again until next year. Yes, I definitely want to be a dentist, but my passion isn't blind. I'd work to strengthen my app and then hopefully get into somewhere cheaper the next year (whether that be by in-state tuition or scholarships). Heck, the dentist I shadow said that if I didn't get in somewhere in NC, I should just wait it out until the next year. He's been in the business for a long time, and I guess he knows what debt feels like! He's very successful, though, so I think this is probably good advice... But, like I said, I think I could stomach something higher than in-state tuition so long as it isn't outrageous.
 

dmdluffy

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If I applied and couldn't get into a school that would cost me less than approximately $275,000 to finance, I think I would just wait again until next year. Yes, I definitely want to be a dentist, but my passion isn't blind. I'd work to strengthen my app and then hopefully get into somewhere cheaper the next year (whether that be by in-state tuition or scholarships). Heck, the dentist I shadow said that if I didn't get in somewhere in NC, I should just wait it out until the next year. He's been in the business for a long time, and I guess he knows what debt feels like! He's very successful, though, so I think this is probably good advice... But, like I said, I think I could stomach something higher than in-state tuition so long as it isn't outrageous.
Really? You would re-apply the next year with no guarantee to getting accepted somewhere cheaper as well as forfeiting a year of earning potential (which comes off your successful years later in practice, not just the 100K or so in your first year)? Granted it isn't ideal to be in debt a ton but if you're aware of what you're getting into, it's not a death sentence. Your still better off this route than flipping burgers at a Mickey D's.
 

Glimmer1991

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Really? You would re-apply the next year with no guarantee to getting accepted somewhere cheaper as well as forfeiting a year of earning potential (which comes off your successful years later in practice, not just the 100K or so in your first year)? Granted it isn't ideal to be in debt a ton but if you're aware of what you're getting into, it's not a death sentence. Your still better off this route than flipping burgers at a Mickey D's.
If I was able to get in one year and spent the next year making a conscious effort to strengthen my application, common sense would say I'd probably get in the next year as well. :) Of course, it isn't guaranteed, but it would just make sense. I'm not even applying to many schools this summer (maybe 5-6), so if anything, I could branch out the next year and apply to more to broaden my options.

I'd work during that time off, too, and save up some money to use during school. Lots of people take gap years. :) I've just worked my butt off for my grades and DAT score (26 AA/30TS, 3.95 GPA) in hopes that my only options won't be über expensive. If I applied the second year and once again only got into schools that are $300,000+, I'd stomach it.
 
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dmdluffy

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If I was able to get in one year and spent the next year making a conscious effort to strengthen my application, common sense would say I'd probably get in the next year as well. :) Of course, it isn't guaranteed, but it would just make sense. I'm not even applying to many schools this summer (maybe 5-6), so if anything, I could branch out the next year and apply to more to broaden my options.

I'd work during that time off, too, and save up some money to use during school. Lots of people take gap years. :) I've just worked my butt off for my grades and DAT score (26 AA/30TS, 3.95 GPA) in hopes that my only options won't be über expensive. If I applied the second year and once again only got into schools that are $300,000+, I'd stomach it.
Fair enough. With scores like that, you're definitely in the top tier of applicants. Good luck to ya.