plsfoldthx

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Obviously we want to become doctors because we want to help people and we like to solve problems but these reasons just don't seem to be enough for adcoms. What exactly are they looking for?

What are YOUR reasons for wanting to become a doctor?
 

LuciusVorenus

Bad Medicine
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[YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jd9pzC3G-T0[/YOUTUBE]
 

klmnop

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=umsdHZ5nnnY[/youtube]
 
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klmnop

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUePPJmfUOE[/youtube]
 

plsfoldthx

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<embed wmode="opaque" src="http://static.ning.com/socialnetworkmain/widgets/video/flvplayer/flvplayer.swf?v=201003221300" FlashVars="config=http%3A%2F%2Fenriqueiglesias.com%2Fvideo%2Fvideo%2FshowPlayerConfig%3Fid%3D3123159%253AVideo%253A21347%26ck%3D-&amp;video_smoothing=on&amp;autoplay=off&amp;isEmbedCode=1" width="456" height="344" bgColor="#FFFFFF" scale="noscale" allowScriptAccess="always" allowFullScreen="true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer"> </embed> <br /><small><a href="http://enriqueiglesias.com/video/video">Find more videos like this on <em>Enrique Iglesias</em></a></small><br />
:thumbdown:
 

klmnop

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i'm figuring it out

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LHsIbjB5Ck0[/youtube]
 

CaptainSSO

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...........
 
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klmnop

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[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iEFkBxcIH8s[/youtube]
 

riverjib

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I can't imagine being anything else. I really love working with people, and I really love figuring out each puzzle. Though I could provide a million examples of what inspires me, two really close ones are: my mom went to Vietnam and despite taking Malarone and all her prophylactics, ended up hospitalized there and saw multiple infectious disease specialists who could offer her no answers, and recently, my young niece was hospitalized with non-descript and acute pulmonary issues that were blamed on asthma.

Their multiple doctors were all wrong. One of my pharmacology professors figured out both their situations pretty quickly. My mom had Dengue fever, which is nasty but not likely to recur. All the symptoms fit, and it makes sense, five years later. I'm grateful to know that she's not likely to experience repercussions down the road. He also believed that my niece was not asthmatic, and didn't need an allergist. She saw a pulmonologist at Cornell today, and he agreed that her breathing problems were due to the RSV she contracted last fall.

Wherever I end up in medicine, I want to know what I'm doing and be able to provide my patients with answers that are satisfactory. I don't want any patient to leave my office wondering what is wrong. I want to figure it out, and have an established network of professionals who can figure it out if I can't. Nobody should have to accept vague answers like "it's probably viral," or "it's asthma" unless that's the best anyone can offer...really, nobody should be written off with easy diagnoses. I want to do my absolute best to figure out the root of my patients' problems, and to know who can do it if I can't.

My mom has been worrying for years that she contracted something that would eventually kill her. Doctors have told my sister that my niece should delay starting school AND be on a respirator, but her pulmonologist told her today that "home" respirators are not technologically advanced enough to deliver the medication in small enough droplets to reach her lungs. He believes that her problems relate to RSV and her symptoms will abate, though she might need a controller medication when she starts pre-school.

Sorry for the long post. I'm in this because I want to do my best to provide ANSWERS to my patients, or at worst, resources.
 

bobsmith

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Obviously we want to become doctors because we want to help people and we like to solve problems but these reasons just don't seem to be enough for adcoms. What exactly are they looking for?

What are YOUR reasons for wanting to become a doctor?
I suppose I could make an attempt at a real answer:

Admissions committees aren't "looking for" any specific answer. Your reasons for going into medicine are what they are. The real meat of your response comes from backing up your reasons with your experiences, being detailed in your explanations, and showing them that you've put serious thought into your decision.
 

plsfoldthx

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I can't imagine being anything else. I really love working with people, and I really love figuring out each puzzle. Though I could provide a million examples of what inspires me, two really close ones are: my mom went to Vietnam and despite taking Malarone and all her prophylactics, ended up hospitalized there and saw multiple infectious disease specialists who could offer her no answers, and recently, my young niece was hospitalized with non-descript and acute pulmonary issues that were blamed on asthma.

Their multiple doctors were all wrong. One of my pharmacology professors figured out both their situations pretty quickly. My mom had Dengue fever, which is nasty but not likely to recur. All the symptoms fit, and it makes sense, five years later. I'm grateful to know that she's not likely to experience repercussions down the road. He also believed that my niece was not asthmatic, and didn't need an allergist. She saw a pulmonologist at Cornell today, and he agreed that her breathing problems were due to the RSV she contracted last fall.

Wherever I end up in medicine, I want to know what I'm doing and be able to provide my patients with answers that are satisfactory. I don't want any patient to leave my office wondering what is wrong. I want to figure it out, and have an established network of professionals who can figure it out if I can't. Nobody should have to accept vague answers like "it's probably viral," or "it's asthma" unless that's the best anyone can offer...really, nobody should be written off with easy diagnoses. I want to do my absolute best to figure out the root of my patients' problems, and to know who can do it if I can't.

My mom has been worrying for years that she contracted something that would eventually kill her. Doctors have told my sister that my niece should delay starting school AND be on a respirator, but her pulmonologist told her today that "home" respirators are not technologically advanced enough to deliver the medication in small enough droplets to reach her lungs. He believes that her problems relate to RSV and her symptoms will abate, though she might need a controller medication when she starts pre-school.

Sorry for the long post. I'm in this because I want to do my best to provide ANSWERS to my patients, or at worst, resources.
I know the feeling. Late sophomore year of college I came down with enlarged lymph nodes and I got the worst fever of my life. I went to the student health clinic and he said my supraclavicular lymph nodes were enlarged. Long story short, I had a biopsy, HIV, cbc, and almost every test you could imagine. Out of answers, the doc asked me if I had a cat (I did back at home) and said I had cat scratch fever. My lymph nodes kept getting larger and going away... fever would come and go for two years. I was scared ****less. I was always googling stuff and thought I might be dying... I kept rushing back to the clinic demanding answers and reqeuesting to see specialists... thought I had cancer or worse. Nobody could find anything wrong... eventually it just subsided. I still have many enlarged lymph nodes but no real fever. I still am so curious as to what happened to me. It caused me A LOT of anxiety and stress and I ended having a panic attack one day that developed into generalized anxiety. I took some time off and just relaxed and I got much better. Having gone what I've been through I have to echo your thoughts and feel like I have some understanding of what it means to be a patient.
 

NerdyAndrea

Pre-Med Student
Feb 10, 2010
220
2
0
At my school
Status
Pre-Medical
I want to become a Doctor because I had many experiences with being ill or injured that I had to literally complain and cry until someone listened. My parents always listened. It was getting the Doctor to listen at times that made things rough.

When I was 7 came home from South America with some terrible symptoms. They ran every test under the sun. I had scans, and so many other things done. No one seemed to know what was wrong. It was actually natural medicine that saved my butt then. At a loss my parents consulted a Naturopath. The naturopath saved my life. I couldn't breathe or move I looked like the kid from mask. It was a fight for me to live. This is one time no one in conventional medicine could help, but they tried. I will never forget that period of time, it was three months of tests, scans, random diagnosis thrown out. They threw meds at it. I reacted to a lot of them, and I was already really sick. My dad had to drive 60 miles away to the city, and spend $70 as a last ditch effort to save me with the natural remedy. It did work.

The above fuels my passion for integrative health care.We tried the conventional and the unconventional is what helped in the end.

Next I spent a lot of time with a lot of things happening to me that just weren't supposed to at my age. I had and still ahve a wonderful PCP. She is amazing, and listens to me. She also does a lot of detective work when I have a complaint that doesn't quite seem to make sense. She has never told me it's all in my head. I suffered from terrible ovarian cysts that would not go away. She and an awesome PA are the people that helped me with that. When I complained of pain that was really bad, she found the cst and referred me for an ultra sound, and to the OBGYN.....I was 15. The first person I saw as an OBGYN actually told me that my condition was not painful, and it was probaby psychosomatic with pain. I told my mom and she about went through the roof, as did I. Upsetting to say the least. They found me another OBGYN who was amazing. I ended up having to have it surgically removed spring break of that year. Four years later I had to have the whole ovary removed due to having pain. Ultrasound revealed an irregular, dangerous growth. Upon having it surgically removed, they cyst was very large, and the ovary had just died. It wasn't saveable.

I have suffered from a lot of other maladies that weren't supposed to be ailing someone my age. I have also wanted to be a Doctor since I was 2. I used to say I was going to grow up and become a Dr. and kick my mom's boss who was an orthopedic surgeon out of his office.

My PCP who is a family medicine specialist has always been compassionate with me. She's always taken the time to get to the root of my problems, and figure out where I needed to go. She also does urgency and Emergency medicine, and I've seen her sometimes when I've had to get urgent or emergency care. The way that she is with me, and how much she's been an advocate for me when I've been ill has been really inspiring to me. I really want to do family medicine. She sees everyone from young kids to the elderly, and is also letting me shadow her. She's one of my role models. I also want very much to be able to help people, especially in rural and underserved populations. If I can help someone ease their suffering, even a little, just knowing what's wrong sometimes is a HUGE help, then I have done a good thing. I also with my own ailments, and the care I've received from my own Doctor am inclned to dig deeply when something mysterious comes my way, or something that doesn't fit the etiology of the person coming in with the complaint. I think that in a rural and underserved population it will probably be the expectation that tings might not be found right away. I never want to follow a formula but rather take the time to find out what is going on with the person. These are my personal reasons for medicine.

Hope deferred makes the heart sick, but a longing fulfilled is a tree of life.

The bible verse above is how I feel about medicine. I am not really religious, but this verse sums up my feelings on why I want to do medicine. If you're interested it's Proverbs 13:12

A
 

NerdyAndrea

Pre-Med Student
Feb 10, 2010
220
2
0
At my school
Status
Pre-Medical
I can't imagine being anything else. I really love working with people, and I really love figuring out each puzzle. Though I could provide a million examples of what inspires me, two really close ones are: my mom went to Vietnam and despite taking Malarone and all her prophylactics, ended up hospitalized there and saw multiple infectious disease specialists who could offer her no answers, and recently, my young niece was hospitalized with non-descript and acute pulmonary issues that were blamed on asthma.

Their multiple doctors were all wrong. One of my pharmacology professors figured out both their situations pretty quickly. My mom had Dengue fever, which is nasty but not likely to recur. All the symptoms fit, and it makes sense, five years later. I'm grateful to know that she's not likely to experience repercussions down the road. He also believed that my niece was not asthmatic, and didn't need an allergist. She saw a pulmonologist at Cornell today, and he agreed that her breathing problems were due to the RSV she contracted last fall.

Wherever I end up in medicine, I want to know what I'm doing and be able to provide my patients with answers that are satisfactory. I don't want any patient to leave my office wondering what is wrong. I want to figure it out, and have an established network of professionals who can figure it out if I can't. Nobody should have to accept vague answers like "it's probably viral," or "it's asthma" unless that's the best anyone can offer...really, nobody should be written off with easy diagnoses. I want to do my absolute best to figure out the root of my patients' problems, and to know who can do it if I can't.

My mom has been worrying for years that she contracted something that would eventually kill her. Doctors have told my sister that my niece should delay starting school AND be on a respirator, but her pulmonologist told her today that "home" respirators are not technologically advanced enough to deliver the medication in small enough droplets to reach her lungs. He believes that her problems relate to RSV and her symptoms will abate, though she might need a controller medication when she starts pre-school.

Sorry for the long post. I'm in this because I want to do my best to provide ANSWERS to my patients, or at worst, resources.
riverjb I know exactly how you feel thank you for posting this!
 

NerdyAndrea

Pre-Med Student
Feb 10, 2010
220
2
0
At my school
Status
Pre-Medical
I know the feeling. Late sophomore year of college I came down with enlarged lymph nodes and I got the worst fever of my life. I went to the student health clinic and he said my supraclavicular lymph nodes were enlarged. Long story short, I had a biopsy, HIV, cbc, and almost every test you could imagine. Out of answers, the doc asked me if I had a cat (I did back at home) and said I had cat scratch fever. My lymph nodes kept getting larger and going away... fever would come and go for two years. I was scared ****less. I was always googling stuff and thought I might be dying... I kept rushing back to the clinic demanding answers and reqeuesting to see specialists... thought I had cancer or worse. Nobody could find anything wrong... eventually it just subsided. I still have many enlarged lymph nodes but no real fever. I still am so curious as to what happened to me. It caused me A LOT of anxiety and stress and I ended having a panic attack one day that developed into generalized anxiety. I took some time off and just relaxed and I got much better. Having gone what I've been through I have to echo your thoughts and feel like I have some understanding of what it means to be a patient.
I would have been VERY scared too. It isn't fun to have symptoms that you can't find a cause for. WOW still swollen? UUgghhh I'd still be looking for answers too. I hope that one day you find them. Our bodies are beautiful, amazing, wonderful things, but sometimes as beautiful amazing wonderful machines there appears to b no rhyme or reason. Something happens, but one doesn't know the cause. That is very scary. I recently read an article on a group that is doing nothing but studying undiagnosed medical problems. There's a woman who has horribly painful cysts in her mouth and many other accompanying conditions. There's no known ause for them, or known way to cure them. Amazing all the things we get to explore in medicine.
 

riverjib

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I know the feeling. Late sophomore year of college I came down with enlarged lymph nodes and I got the worst fever of my life. I went to the student health clinic and he said my supraclavicular lymph nodes were enlarged. Long story short, I had a biopsy, HIV, cbc, and almost every test you could imagine. Out of answers, the doc asked me if I had a cat (I did back at home) and said I had cat scratch fever. My lymph nodes kept getting larger and going away... fever would come and go for two years. I was scared ****less. I was always googling stuff and thought I might be dying... I kept rushing back to the clinic demanding answers and reqeuesting to see specialists... thought I had cancer or worse. Nobody could find anything wrong... eventually it just subsided. I still have many enlarged lymph nodes but no real fever. I still am so curious as to what happened to me. It caused me A LOT of anxiety and stress and I ended having a panic attack one day that developed into generalized anxiety. I took some time off and just relaxed and I got much better. Having gone what I've been through I have to echo your thoughts and feel like I have some understanding of what it means to be a patient.
That's really scary! I have never had "unexplained" symptoms, but I found a lump in my breast when I was 18. The highly qualified (NYU/Mayo) trained jerk of a surgeon I first met with had an ultrasound done, and popped in to tell me it was a 50/50 chance it was cancer since it wasn't a cyst. It was a benign fibroadenoma, which is really common, and I wouldn't have been left alone crying in that exam room if he had taken more than 30 seconds to talk to me honestly...especially since it was more like a 3% risk that it was cancerous when I was 18!

I'm not turning this into an "insensitive" doc thread, but we're all shaped somehow. I dealt with some awful physicians, and some great ones. I worked in health ion to go into health care was based on an interest in medicine that developed in my 20's. I have plenty to learn, but it's really important to me to spend enough time with my patients to figure out the best course of action.

I'm not naive. Some patients are extremely difficult, and some are merely seeking attention. Others are honestly looking for answers, and will comply with suggested treatments. It doesn't really matter...my job as a physician (someday) will be to honestly seek out answers to their problems. Even the craziest hypochondriac might have a legitimate complaint.

It boggles me when I see people (like my mother, or you) who are basically blown off by docs who are unwilling to put in the extra time to figure out what's really going on.
 
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If you are looking for the textbook answer the only advice I have is to NOT say money, girls, cars, mary J, etc. There are hoping to find a truly altruistic, genuine person. Honestly, my biggest challenge will be choosing which reasons to include in my response because there are lots of reasons to love medicine. Best of luck to you.
 

Sammich117

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I suppose I could make an attempt at a real answer:

Admissions committees aren't "looking for" any specific answer. Your reasons for going into medicine are what they are. The real meat of your response comes from backing up your reasons with your experiences, being detailed in your explanations, and showing them that you've put serious thought into your decision.
This.
They're looking for individual passion, not that someone can just recite what they've heard hundreds of times over. Adcoms are pretty good at weeding out bs.
Find whatever pulled you into medicine and go with it.
 

LIDO

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Really?

Write your own personal statement. :rolleyes:
 

akinetopsia

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The reason you are getting some of the nonchalant or dismissive replies you have been is because this topic is like the electrical bill - it keeps coming up every month or so, no one looks forward to it, and has been discussed more than a few times.

Everyone has their unique reasons for pursuing medicine, and someone else's motivation may not make sense for you. You would probably get a more receptive and responsive audience if you led right off the bat by describing why you want to be a physician.
 

armybound

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I suppose I could make an attempt at a real answer:

Admissions committees aren't "looking for" any specific answer. Your reasons for going into medicine are what they are. The real meat of your response comes from backing up your reasons with your experiences, being detailed in your explanations, and showing them that you've put serious thought into your decision.
This.
They're looking for individual passion, not that someone can just recite what they've heard hundreds of times over. Adcoms are pretty good at weeding out bs.
Find whatever pulled you into medicine and go with it.
Ding ding ding.
 
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I suppose I could make an attempt at a real answer:

Admissions committees aren't "looking for" any specific answer. Your reasons for going into medicine are what they are. The real meat of your response comes from backing up your reasons with your experiences, being detailed in your explanations, and showing them that you've put serious thought into your decision.
:thumbup: Nicely done blobby bob.
 

RogueUnicorn

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I can't continue reading when I see this phrase. It screams of immaturity.
truth. to me, anyway. i can see myself doing a lot of things. we're all (at least in theory) talented people. we can do lots.
 
Mar 16, 2010
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sometimes its not so much knowing that it's what u want to do...but more that you don't really want to do anything else...
 

Drrrrrr. Celty

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Because if I don't I won't be able to come home tonight.. lol.
But seriously, It's a profession which seems very interesting and lucrative. It pays well too. ;)
 
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because i can do something crazy that may work but ill convince people with something like "trust me, i am a doctor".
 
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akinetopsia

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Hypothetical: for the people that said, "I can't see myself doing anything else", did you arrive at the that decision by process of elimination by actually trying anything else, or was it just a mental exercise?

Example: Well, I know I want to help people, but:

  1. I didn't like doing their yardwork when I was 16, mowing their grass and mulching their flower beds.
  2. I didn't like preparing their taxes and trying to get all of their receipts and forms to do so
  3. I didn't like teaching middle school
  4. I didn't like modeling, which was weird since models help people, they make them feel good about themselves, they also show them how to dress cool... and wear their hair in interesting ways.
  5. I didn't like being a self-help author, even though I liked the idea of helping people help themselves.
And so on...

Could I imagine myself doing something else? Sure. If you don't like the jobs that are out there now, there are new industries popping up all the time that didn't exist 10-20 years ago. Think there were people that focused on search engine optimization back in the 70s? No.
 
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because i wasn't good enough to get into the holiday inn express
 

akinetopsia

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To stay in the Holiday Inn Express or in the manager trainee program? You can always sneak in for the continental breakfast. I heard they have waffles.. whaaaaat
 
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I decided when i was 10 that i wanted to go into medicine, i grew up with my grandpa while he was sick, and it was obvious to me that the only thing i want in life is to help people and make sure they are not suffering.
 

Ischemic

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Wow another ridiculous thread. Aside from my initial reaction of "Well of course for the chicks, power and money DUH!!" I thought again what the OP wanted by posting this question.

I couldn't come up with anything else except to think "who the hell cares why anyone else's reason is to enter medicine?" I mean you have your reasons and I have mine. And to ask a question that you know the answer will stem from A - Z makes completely no sense whatsoever. Is there any good from me knowing your reasons and vice versa? Nope. Do I care? Nope. Am I on the adcom so that influencing me here will help get you in school? Nope. Maybe OP wants to share? Good for him but it doesn't change the fact that this was a stupid question to begin with.
 

gymtanlaundry

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Money and chicks, brah.
 

BenUstudent

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I was two years into an architecture program and I got sick of being hunched over a desk scribbling on a piece of paper in isolation from the outside world.
I am a really good people person (I am a kickass Server and get carried away in conversation, sorry if your food is cold, lol) and good in Science (particularly Bio) so Basically Treat the Human Body + Individual = an awesome physician that the public deserve
 
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plsfoldthx

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Wow another ridiculous thread. Aside from my initial reaction of "Well of course for the chicks, power and money DUH!!" I thought again what the OP wanted by posting this question.

I couldn't come up with anything else except to think "who the hell cares why anyone else's reason is to enter medicine?" I mean you have your reasons and I have mine. And to ask a question that you know the answer will stem from A - Z makes completely no sense whatsoever. Is there any good from me knowing your reasons and vice versa? Nope. Do I care? Nope. Am I on the adcom so that influencing me here will help get you in school? Nope. Maybe OP wants to share? Good for him but it doesn't change the fact that this was a stupid question to begin with.
It's just a discussion brah. If you don't care, that's your problem. I don't go into threads I don't care about and throw a tantrum. Go study or something.
 
May 27, 2009
4,020
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Wow another ridiculous thread. Aside from my initial reaction of "Well of course for the chicks, power and money DUH!!" I thought again what the OP wanted by posting this question.

I couldn't come up with anything else except to think "who the hell cares why anyone else's reason is to enter medicine?" I mean you have your reasons and I have mine. And to ask a question that you know the answer will stem from A - Z makes completely no sense whatsoever. Is there any good from me knowing your reasons and vice versa? Nope. Do I care? Nope. Am I on the adcom so that influencing me here will help get you in school? Nope. Maybe OP wants to share? Good for him but it doesn't change the fact that this was a stupid question to begin with.
No need to get upset. Either say something funny or useful, and move on with your life.