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FormerReservist

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I saw the other thread asking why don't people apply to the Carribean schools and not waster their time. Applying to USU is another easy way to get your MD, esp if you have a low GPA. Its MSAR average is 3.45 and 30
 

Pedsbro

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Previous poster summed it up perfectly. It's a 13 year commitment...7 active, 6 reserve. That's a LONG time to be in the military. If you are absolutely 100% sure you want to be in the military that long, then of course go for it, but I don't know many people who can think that far ahead in their lives :) . Another point is you are limited in the specialities you can choose...for example, if whatever branch you pick (lets say Navy) doesn't need anymore ortho surgeons at the time you're ready to pick a specialty, then guess what...you probably won't get into that residency. They'll say "well, we don't need anymore of those, but we sure need more ______ specialists", and then that's what you're "steered" toward. Also, there are some subspecialities that are in little or NO demand in the military and don't exist there.

If your credentials are good, and you want some time in the military (much less than 13 years) and want them to pay for med school for you, try the HPSP (Health Professions Scholarship Program).
 
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helpfuldoc2b

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Previous poster summed it up perfectly. It's a 13 year commitment...7 active, 6 reserve. That's a LONG time to be in the military. If you are absolutely 100% sure you want to be in the military that long, then of course go for it, but I don't know many people who can think that far ahead in their lives :) . Another point is you are limited in the specialities you can choose...for example, if whatever branch you pick (lets say Navy) doesn't need anymore ortho surgeons at the time you're ready to pick a specialty, then guess what...you probably won't get into that residency. They'll say "well, we don't need anymore of those, but we sure need more ______ specialists", and then that's what you're "steered" toward. Also, there are some subspecialities that are in little or NO demand in the military and don't exist there.

If your credentials are good, and you want some time in the military (much less than 13 years) and want them to pay for med school for you, try the HPSP (Health Professions Scholarship Program).

SGU isnt military, its a carribean medical school in grenada, west indies. www.sgu.edu Its knows an the top tier of carribean med schools which has a good record for residency placement. You will still be considered an international medical grad and have some loop holes to go through and may have some harder time getting into competitve residencies compared to US schools, it is also more expensive, but alas AN alternative for those who did not succeed in admissions into a US med school.
 

nlax30

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SGU isnt military, its a carribean medical school in grenada, west indies. www.sgu.edu Its knows an the top tier of carribean med schools which has a good record for residency placement. You will still be considered an international medical grad and have some loop holes to go through and may have some harder time getting into competitve residencies compared to US schools, it is also more expensive, but alas AN alternative for those who did not succeed in admissions into a US med school.

The OP asked about USU, not SGU.
 

airwolfrocks999

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Well, I would assume some people just don't want the military commitment that would follow. (I'm assuming you're talking about Uniformed Services University?)


What do they mean by military commitment? Does it mean you have to actually be on the fighting grounds of Iraq and Afghanistan? ( and might get killed or ,even worse, become disabled? )
 

nlax30

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What do they mean by military commitment? Does it mean you have to actually be on the fighting grounds of Iraq and Afghanistan? ( and might get killed or ,even worse, become disabled? )

Well if you attend USU (Military Med school) or get the Military to pay for med school then you are going to be serving as a military doctor for them for however many years is specified in the "agreement", roughly a year for each year the military pays for schooling. So that means you are serving in the military and will go where they need you. If there's an active conflict somewhere you could be in a combat zone.
 

Pedsbro

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What do they mean by military commitment? Does it mean you have to actually be on the fighting grounds of Iraq and Afghanistan? ( and might get killed or ,even worse, become disabled? )

Take a look at my earlier post. USU is at least a 13 year commitment...7 active, 6 reserve. They will send you wherever you are needed, and you have no choice but to go. So yes, you can end up in Iraq or Afghanistan.

USU is a set commitment no matter what... The other poster that said you work for them as long as they paid for you in med school is probably referring to the HPSP (Health Professions Scholarship Program), which is quite different. Your best bet is to email USU or a recruiter in the military branch you're interested in if you want more accurate and recent info on either option.
 

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Pedsbro, you are wrong! USU says that 6 years can be spent on IRR or Reserve. Also, the military usually don't call back officers from IRR, unless there is something major like World World III...
 

Pedsbro

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Pedsbro, you are wrong! USU says that 6 years can be spent on IRR or Reserve. Also, the military usually don't call back officers from IRR, unless there is something major like World World III...



Sigh...you are still tied to the military for 13 years..and there is always a chance to be called back into service. Anyway, you had originally asked why people don't go there for med school and the answer is the same...7 years active, 6 in the reserve is a long time to be tied to the military and many people don't want that. Kinda funny, you spent all this time trying to prove me wrong when in fact you really didn't. :laugh: Oh, and my brother is a military doctor and one of my classmates just got into USU...so don't argue.

Edit: By the way genius, take a look at this article about recent IRR callups in the war on terror: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individual_Ready_Reserve#Activations_in_the_War_on_Terror
 
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