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Why is Public Health Schools predominately women?

Discussion in 'Public Health Degrees (Masters and Doctoral)' started by HopkinsPreMed, Apr 6, 2007.

  1. HopkinsPreMed

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    At yale, 82% of their students are women. At Hopkins, more than 70% are women.

    Why is this?
     
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  3. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    Graduate schooling is predominantly women...for reasons I'm not really sure of, but if you look at the numbers across the board, there are more women in PhD/Masters programs while the numbers are about 50/50 in medicine and law.

    maybe its true that the women are more intelligent than us guys...
     
  4. AwaPremed

    AwaPremed Member

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    I think graduate schooling varies. Some fields are predominantly male and some are predominantly female. For example, women in engineering grad programs are still a minority. i really can't answer this one...
     
  5. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    true... i forgot about engineering :)
     
  6. HopkinsPreMed

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    i notice all the hard-science subjects are predominately men while softer sciences are predominately women.

    Anybody already in a public health program want to comment on this? Are most of your classmates women?
     
  7. redil

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    Um, yes. Don't go to PH school expecting to meet guys.
     
  8. HopkinsPreMed

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    is public health characteristically an unmasculine field?

    this is deterring me from applying
     
  9. ceruleanblue

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    Honestly, I think it's the money. Men are more turned off by low paying non-profit jobs (or something similar, because public health is not very lucrative) than women because men see themselves as the breadearners. Most men have problems when they earn less than women. I have nothing against men--it just seems like this is the way things are.
     
  10. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    there are fields within Public health which are what could be considered "Cash-cow" concentrations.... Health Management is one that has a higher percentage of men then females...as is Biostats and Tox.....if you look at Health Behavior you'll probably find more women in that field... it's true a lot of public health is 'feminine' but that shouldn't be a deciding factor of (not) pursuing it....and if you're a guy who's looking for a study that you'd be surrounded by girls...not a bad way to go :)
     
  11. HopkinsPreMed

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    how much do typical health management people make?
     
  12. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    ummm it depends...

    you could go into consulting which is a huge money-making field...you start off around 60-70K then if you stay in for a couple of years you'd easily be making 6 figures..or you could go into hospital management, which is also a 6-figure job if you climb up a bit...

    there is a huge range for management from 40K and up..the sky is limit in healthcare management...who knows you may become CEO of a healthcare company and be raking in millions..

    but you better get use to long workdays...its not the cushy 9-5 job...CEOs and consultants can work upwards of 80 hours a week, better be something you love.
     
  13. bbas

    bbas Senior Member

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    Do you know if this applies to epi as well? I've noticed that there are a bunch of science oriented consulting companies that hire epidemiologists, but I haven't been able to find much info on how much experience you need and potential salaries.
     
  14. AndrewJ42

    AndrewJ42 Member

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    it could apply to Epi also...but a lot of big consulting groups such as Accenture and Deloitte Touche seem to have a strong preference for those who study Healthcare Management...mostly as they deal in management consulting
     
  15. wearepsu

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    I think there are several reasons for this...

    Like it was said, money is a big reason. There are much easier ways to make more money (MBA for example). While you can make a reasonable salary, a lot of men are lazy and greedy.

    I wouldn't consider biostat/epi "softer sciences". I can't really speak for the other areas of Public Health though.

    I would say even the areas you think are "harder sciences" are becoming more dominated by women. I am the only male in my lab, and was in the minority in my bioengineering program. There are more female med students then males as well. I think the health field in general is becoming female dominated.
     

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