fellowstudent92

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so hard if it is pass/fail? I've been reading threads where many UConn students don't prefer their schools because it's too hard? How can this be true if they are one of the few schools that are true pass/fail? Like what makes their school more hard than others that don't have pass/fail?
 

sjv

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I thought it was because they share the same classes/curriculum with the medical school students for the bio-medical sciences.
 
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fellowstudent92

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So? I dont hear columbia kids complaining as much as those from uconn and they take classes with med students.
 

Bereno

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Hmmm, deciding to re-word my statement - UConn accepts students after telling them it is a very demanding curriculum, and that is true - it is very, very demanding. Not all students really understand this when they accept a seat.
 
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fellowstudent92

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So reading that comment of yours tells me that there is something wrong with the school, which we do not know. Interesting.
 

Bereno

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Something wrong with the school? No, I would not say that. UConn does give a very solid education - I will openly promote the academic merits of UConn, especially those interested in specializing.
 
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Weakfart

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Something wrong with the school? No, I would not say that. UConn does give a very solid education - I will openly promote the academic merits of UConn, especially those interested in specializing.
Question about UConn, do you think the combined classes with Med students helped or would you have prefered dedicated dental courses instead? I'm interested in schools combining the two programs but at the same time I think it might be worse than taking dedicated dental courses.
 

Bis-GMA111

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the only real benefit that i can personally see from attending a school with an integrated medical/dental curriculum is that it will help IMMENSELY if you decide to go the OMFS route. other than that...yeah, not too sure.
 
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Weakfart

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the only real benefit that i can personally see from attending a school with an integrated medical/dental curriculum is that it will help IMMENSELY if you decide to go the OMFS route. other than that...yeah, not too sure.
That's what I'm thinking as well. I wonder if you go to a school like this, would the MD/DDS route be accelerated since you've taken those courses already.
 

y3nd0

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Question about UConn, do you think the combined classes with Med students helped or would you have prefered dedicated dental courses instead? I'm interested in schools combining the two programs but at the same time I think it might be worse than taking dedicated dental courses.
Unless you plan on doing OMFS, I think dedicated dental courses will be more suitable. My school lumps med and dent together for gross anatomy and histology. Gross anatomy was pretty dry for me when it came to abdomen and perineum (couldn't wait for those weeks to be over).

On a somewhat related note, I do believe that the combined courses does good for both dental and medical students as it gives insight, appreciation for the other profession, and it bridges the gap in education. Taking gross anatomy was somewhat eye opening, especially for the medical students. The level of ignorance about dentistry from some med students was staggering.
 

Weakfart

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Unless you plan on doing OMFS, I think dedicated dental courses will be more suitable. My school lumps med and dent together for gross anatomy and histology. Gross anatomy was pretty dry for me when it came to abdomen and perineum (couldn't wait for those weeks to be over).

On a somewhat related note, I do believe that the combined courses does good for both dental and medical students as it gives insight, appreciation for the other profession, and it bridges the gap in education. Taking gross anatomy was somewhat eye opening, especially for the medical students. The level of ignorance about dentistry from some med students was staggering.

Man that sounds kind of awesome, but stressful at the same time. What are the ignorant on?
 

y3nd0

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Man that sounds kind of awesome, but stressful at the same time. What are the ignorant on?
"Are you guys getting your doctorate or your master's?"
"So... are you guys going to be doctors when you graduate?"
Quotes from two different medical students. I know, right?

And in gross anatomy, dental related slides were far and few, and most of the medical students I saw would just skip the slides as they deemed them to be unimportant (which was sort of true in terms of exam questions).
 

Bereno

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Question about UConn, do you think the combined classes with Med students helped or would you have prefered dedicated dental courses instead? I'm interested in schools combining the two programs but at the same time I think it might be worse than taking dedicated dental courses.
Hard to say since I only know what it is like to sit with the med students - we had the same anatomy, immunology, histo, path, etc. We literally had the same exact tests as well, so I honestly dont know what it would be like lol. The hard thing at UConn is that we have med school in the morning and dental school in the afternoon... Adding those together makes for a lot of work, to say the least. Does this make it "worse"? Well, that depends on what you mean by worse...

That's what I'm thinking as well. I wonder if you go to a school like this, would the MD/DDS route be accelerated since you've taken those courses already.
No, it will take the same amount of time. It will likely make taking the USMLE step I easier, but the step 2 and step 3 will be no easier from what I have come to understand.
 

HamPorter

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If you think you want to specialize, 100% come to UConn. It's relatively cheap and has an extremely high specialization rate. This year, 8 are going for peds, 5 OMFS, 7-8 ortho, 1 perio, 1-2 prosth.. out of a class of low 40 something. They give you 10 weeks after 1st year to do research if you want, there's an insane amount of clubs to get involved in and gain leadership experience, small classes so you get to know the faculty really well, ect. But It's a little trickier if you come in knowing you want to do general. If you were choosing between UConn and a 100K private school, I'd still say come here even if you want to do general. Just know that you will pretty much have to do a GPR.. I think maybe one student per year the last couple years has gone straight into practice (out of a class of about 40). If someone was choosing between their in-state school and UConn and wants to do general.. That's a tough call. I think some of my classmates came in saying they were going to do general and are now thinking of specializing just because it is so specialty driven and our number of procedures may not be as high as other schools. As a third yr, we saw our first patients at the start of this year which consisted of cleanings/recalls. You then find that those pts need treatment so thats where we start getting operative, possible complete dentures, RPDs, ect... But now there is a curriculum change and 2nd yrs will be getting up into clinic at the end of the yr to start seeing patients like we did at the start of 3rd yr. We do not need to find our own patients but we need to schedule them which can be a pain in the butt. This seems to be a sort of middle ground because I have heard of schools like BU where they need to find AND schedule their own patients, and other schools where I have friends that just show up and have a patient assigned to them for the day. For all of you choosing schools, I would definitely find out from programs how you get your patients (whether you need to find them, schedule them, ect.). Going thru the medical school curriculum here made NBDE 1 very easy to pass. Classmates of mine pretty much took 1-2 weeks max to study and I have not heard of anyone failing... and if you're into oral surgery, the curriculum sets you up to do very well on the CBSE. During the first 2 yrs, we only have our dental classes 1-3 afternoons per week, so we actually had a lot more free time the first 2 years than we do as 3rd/4th years since we're now here 8-5 mon-fri
 

HamPorter

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And when I say free time during 1st/2nd year.. I mean you won't be sitting thru lectures at school. You have the afternoon off and will be at home or at the library studying your med school lectures. But people make time for the gym, going out on weekends, hikes (bereno), ect.. There are 5 main med school exams each year for 1st/2nd yr that are in blocks of 8-12 weeks.. which is a fairly long time and lots of material for 1 exam. So the year consists of waves of being fairly relaxed and just keeping up with the material and enjoying life for the first month or so of the exam block.. followed by high intensity/kill yourself studying all day every day for the month or so leading up to the next exam. We have more exams/quizzes on a weekly basis 3rd year. I actually prefer the longer exam blocks.
 

Weakfart

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If you think you want to specialize, 100% come to UConn. It's relatively cheap and has an extremely high specialization rate. This year, 8 are going for peds, 5 OMFS, 7-8 ortho, 1 perio, 1-2 prosth.. out of a class of low 40 something. They give you 10 weeks after 1st year to do research if you want, there's an insane amount of clubs to get involved in and gain leadership experience, small classes so you get to know the faculty really well, ect. But It's a little trickier if you come in knowing you want to do general. If you were choosing between UConn and a 100K private school, I'd still say come here even if you want to do general. Just know that you will pretty much have to do a GPR.. I think maybe one student per year the last couple years has gone straight into practice (out of a class of about 40). If someone was choosing between their in-state school and UConn and wants to do general.. That's a tough call. I think some of my classmates came in saying they were going to do general and are now thinking of specializing just because it is so specialty driven and our number of procedures may not be as high as other schools. As a third yr, we saw our first patients at the start of this year which consisted of cleanings/recalls. You then find that those pts need treatment so thats where we start getting operative, possible complete dentures, RPDs, ect... But now there is a curriculum change and 2nd yrs will be getting up into clinic at the end of the yr to start seeing patients like we did at the start of 3rd yr. We do not need to find our own patients but we need to schedule them which can be a pain in the butt. This seems to be a sort of middle ground because I have heard of schools like BU where they need to find AND schedule their own patients, and other schools where I have friends that just show up and have a patient assigned to them for the day. For all of you choosing schools, I would definitely find out from programs how you get your patients (whether you need to find them, schedule them, ect.). Going thru the medical school curriculum here made NBDE 1 very easy to pass. Classmates of mine pretty much took 1-2 weeks max to study and I have not heard of anyone failing... and if you're into oral surgery, the curriculum sets you up to do very well on the CBSE. During the first 2 yrs, we only have our dental classes 1-3 afternoons per week, so we actually had a lot more free time the first 2 years than we do as 3rd/4th years since we're now here 8-5 mon-fri
Bro, I think you've sold me on a dream school... I'm outside of the NE area though (NY) so I might have to leave this thread! Haha
 

HamPorter

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Haha there are a decent amount of out of state and out of new england here. Lots from NY, actually
 

Bereno

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Bro, I think you've sold me on a dream school... I'm outside of the NE area though (NY) so I might have to leave this thread! Haha
As an FYI I am from Washington, and HamPorter is from the mid-west. Like he said, there are a lot of people from NY here :)
 

Weakfart

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As an FYI I am from Washington, and HamPorter is from the mid-west. Like he said, there are a lot of people from NY here :)
Thanks guys/gals! :) I appreciate the feedback, I hope to be at UConn then!!
 
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UCONN dental school is so freaking good. I wish I have good enough stats to get into there and I actually like CT bc I used to live there
 

Natron3

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I hear they revamped the whole thing. Possibly even PBL now? Maybe someone else can comment.
Had an interview there last month and I was extremely impressed with the students, professors, and curriculum. In comparison to some programs there seemed to be little to no competition because of the pass/fail system being integrated at UConn (true pass/fail). The technology is extremely up to date and the campus is under constant revisions to make students integrate the newest and greatest technologies that the dental field has to offer. Currently contemplating between my state school and UConn as to which is my favorite.
 
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