Oct 1, 2015
6
0
Status
Dental Student
I'm a PGY1 at GPR program which I like very much but we don't place implants. I would like to be able to place posterior implants as a General Practitioner. I heard there are a few GPR programs that train their GPR residents to place implants. I was thinking of applying to those programs but I'm not sure how well they teach their residents compared to the CE courses out there.
What do you guys think about losing another year of potential income to do a second year of GPR to learn to place Implants?
 

Saddleshoes

10+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2007
617
386
Status
Dentist
Two points...
1. I was just told, two days ago, that there are only 7 GPR programs with a second year option.
2. I was under the impression that "CODA" required all GPR programs have the opportunity to do implants. If your program says they, flat out, don't do implants you might want to ask for that to be given to you "in writing" and/or ask about the policy that prevents you from doing implants on ALL cases. If you start asking the right questions you might find that a treatment plan with an implant or two might be approved under the right circumstances.
 

punchdrunk7

7+ Year Member
Sep 15, 2009
342
13
Status
Dentist
I completed a one year residency at the VA in Salt Lake City. I ended up placing 95 implants. Some anteriors as well, mainly in the posterior though.

I know my limits and know how to handle complications. Everyone can place implants but learning how to manage difficult cases or problems that will arise is key. I still have plenty to learn which is why CE is good once you've done a lot.

CE will only get you so much in my opinion. You'll never place implants in most CE courses. Some you will but honestly placing 5 implants at some CE you haven't even seen the tip of the iceberg.


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shendo

15+ Year Member
Mar 3, 2002
76
38
Two points...
1. I was just told, two days ago, that there are only 7 GPR programs with a second year option.
2. I was under the impression that "CODA" required all GPR programs have the opportunity to do implants. If your program says they, flat out, don't do implants you might want to ask for that to be given to you "in writing" and/or ask about the policy that prevents you from doing implants on ALL cases. If you start asking the right questions you might find that a treatment plan with an implant or two might be approved under the right circumstances.
________________
Technically, what CODA accreditation standards require for GPR programs with regards to implants is that the program teaches residents how to "manage" implants which is very broad/vague and doesn't necessarily require the program to have residents place implants.
I've pasted a blurb from the CODA GPR accreditation manual with regards to this below:

2-4 The program must provide training to ensure that upon completion of the program, the resident is able to manage the following:
a) medical emergencies;
b) implants;
c) oral mucosal diseases;
d) temporomandibular disorder
e) orofacial pain.
Intent: “Manage” is defined in the Definition of Terms on page 9 of this document. The program is expected to provide educational instruction, either didactically or clinically, during the program which enhances the resident’s ability to manage the above areas.
 

Saddleshoes

10+ Year Member
Oct 28, 2007
617
386
Status
Dentist
________________
Technically, what CODA accreditation standards require for GPR programs with regards to implants is that the program teaches residents how to "manage" implants which is very broad/vague and doesn't necessarily require the program to have residents place implants.
I've pasted a blurb from the CODA GPR accreditation manual with regards to this below:

2-4 The program must provide training to ensure that upon completion of the program, the resident is able to manage the following:
a) medical emergencies;
b) implants;
c) oral mucosal diseases;
d) temporomandibular disorder
e) orofacial pain.
Intent: “Manage” is defined in the Definition of Terms on page 9 of this document. The program is expected to provide educational instruction, either didactically or clinically, during the program which enhances the resident’s ability to manage the above areas.
Thank You shendo!
I defer to your superior knowledge in this matter.
There is a big difference between "opportunity to do" and "management of" when it comes to implants.
 
Nov 26, 2012
1
0
Status
I completed a one year residency at the VA in Salt Lake City. I ended up placing 95 implants. Some anteriors as well, mainly in the posterior though.

I know my limits and know how to handle complications. Everyone can place implants but learning how to manage difficult cases or problems that will arise is key. I still have plenty to learn which is why CE is good once you've done a lot.

CE will only get you so much in my opinion. You'll never place implants in most CE courses. Some you will but honestly placing 5 implants at some CE you haven't even seen the tip of the iceberg.


Sent from my iPhone using SDN mobile app

Hey did you have any experience with basic perio surgery / grafting? Cerec?

You placed 90 implants, did you do much hard and soft tissue augmentation?

What kind of grades/DAT did you have - tough to get in?
 

punchdrunk7

7+ Year Member
Sep 15, 2009
342
13
Status
Dentist
Hey did you have any experience with basic perio surgery / grafting? Cerec?

You placed 90 implants, did you do much hard and soft tissue augmentation?

What kind of grades/DAT did you have - tough to get in?
Yes at the program you can schedule as much or as little perio surgery as you'd like depending on your patient pool. I didn't love perio surgeries so I gave those to my co-residents who liked to do the CTG, FGG, etc.

I was able to extract over 200 teeth and do many socket/ridge preservation techniques that I later placed implants in those sites. We work with many specialists who love to teach and work mainly in the private practice setting. This is nice because you know you are getting what's up to date and not out dated like dental school felt at times. We also had an in house lab with a CEREC. We didn't prep and deliver in the same day due to the volume of the veteran population we served.

For the GPR they don't look at the DAT but looked at class rank and GPA. I was top 10% and had a good GPA from dental school. Although rank/grades are important it won't exclude someone if they show interest and that they would be a good fit at the program.


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